THE ANTIQUE BOTTLE COLLECTING BUG !!

SITE BEST VIEWED WITH 1280 X 720 OR HIGHER RESOLUTION

WELCOME TO MY WEBSITE, EVERYTHING IN MY SITE IS DESIGNED & MAINTAINED BY ME & I AM WORKING ON MY HTML CODING TO GET IT CORRECT,BEAR WITH ME I JUST DON'T WANT TO CONVERT TO THE CENTERED PAGE DESIGN..IT'S EASY BUT JUST DOES NOT LOOK AS GOOD TO ME AS THIS FORMAT. .. SEND ME QUESTIONS TO RICKSBOTTLEROOM@GMAIL.COM OR ADMIN@RICKSBOTTLEROOM.COM I RECEIVE ALERTS ON MY PHONE THE MINUTE THEY ARE POSTED AND ANSWER ALL RIGHT AWAY {USUALLY WITHIN 48 HOURS}, .....LOVE DOING RESEARCH,SO KEEP THEM COMING. IF YOU HAVE ANY HISTORY/INFORMATION ON BOTTLES ON MY SITE,PLEASE SEND IT MY WAY AND I'LL BE SURE TO CREDIT AS SUCH. THANKS FOR STOPPING AND BE SURE TO CHECK BACK OFTEN AS I AM ALWAYS UPDATING MY SITE.

 

~ CHECK OUT WEBSITE OF THE MONTH PAGE, KNOW OF A GREAT BOTTLE COLLECTING/RELATED SITE?

SEND IT TO ME AT  ~   ADMIN@RICKSBOTTLEROOM.COM

 

  ~ SUBMIT YOUR FAVORITE FOR BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ~ SEE BOTTLE OF THE WEEK PAGE FOR DETAILS ~ THANKS FOR STOPPING BY. ~

I AM ALWAYS LOOKING TO BUY QUALITY ANTIQUE BOTTLES, SEND ME INFORMATION & PICTURES!!

        I WAS BORN AND RAISED IN A SMALL TOWN IN THE ADIRONDACKS IN UPSTATE NEW YORK. I STARTED DIGGING BOTTLES WHEN I WAS 12 YRS OLD MY STEPFATHER GARY GOT ME HOOKED ON THEM. US LOCAL KIDS USED TO DIG AND SELL THEM TO A GUY WHO TOOK THEM TO FLEA MARKETS.I REMEMBERSOME OF THE STUFF WE USED TO DIG AND RECALL ONE DUMP THAT PRODUCED 16 BUFFALO LITHIA WATERS. I SOLD THEM FOR 6.00 EACH,AND WAS OK WITH THAT (AT 12).THE ONE I DO WISH I STILL HAD WAS THE COLOR OF GASOLINE AND I GOT 25.00 FOR THAT ONE,PROBABLY WORTH MUCH MORE TODAY.

 

NEVER REALLY STOPPED SINCE THEN AS FAR AS COLLECTING,THEN ABOUT 9 YEARS AGO OR SO I FELL INTO A DEAL WITH A LONG TIME DEALER IN BOTTLES AND ALL ANTIQUES. I STRUCK A DEAL AND FOR BOXING UP 3 FULL STORIES OF ANTIQUES I GOT TO KEEP ALL THE BOTTLES AND STONEWARE.(65 PIECES) AND 6500 BOTTLES....I PULLED SOME GREAT STUFF OUT OF THE BUNCH AND REMEMBER HAVING CASES ALL OVER THE PLACE,6500 BOTTLES TAKES UP ALOT OF ROOM.ONE MORNING WENT OUT TO THE BOXES PILED IN YARD AND PULLED OUT A BINNEGERS CANNON AND A GW HOXIE THAT WAS THE FINEST IVE EVER SEEN,ALSO LOG CABIN BITTERS AND TONS OF BLOBS AND HUTCHS AND PANEL MEDICINES.I DECIDED TO START KEEPING POISONS AND ALOT OF THE STONE WARE AND TRADED/SOLD THE REST.I NOW HAVE A DEDICATED ROOM FOR MY OLD ADVERTISING AND BOTTLES  

 I ALSO LIKE INKS AND BLOBS.WHISKEYS ARE ALSO SOMETHING I HAVE SOME OF, I REACHED 250 ENGLISH AND U.S. POISONS {INCLUDING 17 W.T.CO. LATTICES} AND THEN DECIDED TO MOVE INTO INKS LOCAL MEDICINES ECT. & BLOBS. I TRADED ALOT OF THE POISONS AND SOLD SOME TO ADD TO MY BLOBS. I NOW HAVE WELL OVER 350 BLOBS AND AM GETTING MORE ALL THE TIME. OVER THE  YEARS I'VE BEEN IN ON SOME MASSIVE DIGS,COVERING HUGE AREAS AND DIGGING DOWN UP TO 18 FEET AND BROUGHT SOME GREAT STUFF HOME. SOME OF THE PEOPLE I DIG WITH HAVE GOTTEN GREAT STUFF AS WELL AND IT'S ALWAYS A TREASURE HUNT FOR ME. I CAN'T WAIT TO SEE THE NEXT ONE COME OUT AND GET IT CLEANED UP,NOT ALWAYS WHOLE......BUT  I NEVER SEEM TO GROW TIRED OF TRYING THAT NEXT DUMP.I SEARCH AUCTIONS,SALES,INTERNET AS WELL FOR NEW ADDITIONS AND HAVE OVER THE YEARS GOT SOME REAL NICE STUFF,  EITHER FOR MY COLLECTION OR TO TRADE/SELL FOR A DIFFERENT PIECE FOR MY COLLECTION.

THERE ARE FOR NEW COLLECTORS A LOT OF PLACES TO GET A COLLECTION GOING,YARD SALES,ANTIQUESHOPS AND DIGGING.AS YOUR COLLECTION PROGRESSES AUCTIONS CARRY THE MID TO BETTER RANGE GLASS AND OF COURSE THERE IS ONLINE AUCTIONS,WHERE YOU CAN GET ABOUT ANYTHING. BOTTLE SHOWS ARE STILL ONE OF THE MOST INEXPENSIVE PLACES TO GET A NEW ADDITION AND YOU GET TO CHECK IT OUT IN PERSON,WHICH TO ME IS A HUGE PLUS. BARTERING AND PARTIAL TRADES ARE ALSO A POSSIBILITY AT SHOWS,UNLIKE AUCTIONS ECT. THE KEY HERE IS RESEARCH IT BEFORE YOU BUY IT,THERE ARE REPRODUCTION /DECORATIVE BOTTLES OUT THERE THAT ARE VERY EASY TO MISTAKE EVEN WHEN A SEASONED COLLECTOR. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A REPRODUCTION AND WHAT I CLASSIFY AS DECORATIVE IS A REPRODUCTION IS A COPY/FACSIMILE OF AN ACTUAL OLD BOTTLE. A DECORATIVE IS LIKE THE WHEATON COFFINS,THEY WERE NEVER PRODUCED TO ACTUALLY BE USED,STRICTLY DECORATIVE.

THERE ARE GREAT RESOURCES OUT THERE FOR BOTTLE COLLECTORS IF YOU SEARCH THEM OUT.SOME ARE OUTDATED BUT GREAT FOR REFERENCE AND IF YOU USE MANY SOURCES YOU CAN COME TO YOUR OWN DECISION. AUCTION HOUSES, EBAY, LIBRARIES, TOWN HALLS AND OTHERS ARE GREAT PLACES TO FIND INFORMATION. LOCAL AUCTIONS AND SALES ARE GOOD PLACES TO FIND AN ADDITION,. I HAVE A FAIRLY LARGE LIBRARY OF COLLECTABLES BOOKS, AND MY E~LIBRARY SO FEEL FREE TO ASK, I WILL BE GLAD TO HELP RESEARCH YOUR LATEST FIND.THE BOTTOM LINE IS ADDING TO YOUR COLLECTION THE BEST EXAMPLE YOU CAN AFFORD TO GET.  I TRY TO POST SOME OF THE STUFF DIGGERS & COLLECTORS NEWER TO THIS GREAT HOBBY WILL FIND. SITES WITH 5,000 DOLLAR BOTTLES ARE GREAT TO LOOK AT TOO, BUT NOT MANY OF US ARE GOING TO DIG OR FIND SOMETHING OF THAT CALIBER .

I TRY AND ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS MOST TIMES WITHIN 48 HOURS AND ENJOY HELPING OUT IN THE RESEARCH. GOOD LUCK THANKS FOR STOPPING AND BE SURE TO STOP BACK OFTEN AS I WILL BE CHANGING AND ADDING ON A REGULAR BASIS AS MY COLLECTION PROGRESSES & CHANGES.THE MAJORITY OF MY INK COLLECTION CAME FROM MY FATHER GARY.I REALLY ENJOY MY SITE ALOT AND ALWAYS WANT IT BETTER!! ENJOY!!  EVERYTHING ON THE FOLLOWING PAGES PLUS SOME IS IN MY BOTTLEROOM, I THINK EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE A DESIGNATED  BOTTLEROOM. I HAVE AROUND 55 INKS YET TO GET ON HERE AS WELL AS THE 150 + BLOBS ECT. SO CHECK BACK OFTEN.

 

 

 

Board of Trustee's National Bottle Museum      

Member Capitol Region Antique Bottle & Insulator Club

 

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BE SURE TO JOIN YOUR LOCAL BOTTLE CLUB AND SUPPORT LOCAL SHOWS BY ATTENDING, NEED A CONTACT OF A CLUB OR SHOW NEAR YOU? LET ME KNOW THROUGH ONE OF THE CONTACT ME TABS AT THE LEFT OF EACH PAGE AND I WILL GET YOU THE INFORMATION. THANK YOU.

THE BOTTLE THAT GOT ME HOOKED ~ CROWN PERFUME

MY FIRST BOTTLE I DUG IN RAQUETTE LAKE THAT REALLY HOOKED ME WAS A CROWN PERFUME WITH THE CROWN SHAPED STOPPER IN TACT, I WAS 12...I STILL HAVE IT.

 

 

CROWN PERFUMERY COMPANY ~ LONDON

 

Crown had it's origins in corset making - In 1840, American, William Sparks Thomson opened his corset business at 40 The Strand, London. He created high busted corsets to "assist the lady whom nature had not endowed with ample fullness". One of Thomson's clients was Queen Victoria - and the Crown was adopted as his trademark.

Now, sometimes Thomson's clients would faint due to the tightness of his corsets - and this, in a way, led to the creation of the Crown Perfumery. Thomson's son William Thomson Jr, was a brilliant chemist, and came up with the idea of producing a lavender based smelling-salt to revive these fainting ladies. One thing led to another and soon, in 1872, Thomson Jr. was producing fine perfumes, which were highly sought after by the trendy ladies of the day.

Crown gained a reputation for quality fragrances and by the end of the 19th century, Crown had a range of 49 scents, available worldwide. It's fragrances included (for the ladies) Marechale, Sarcanthus, Crown Ess Bouquet, Malabar and Matsukita. Gentlemen's scents included Spiced Limes, Marquis, Sandringham, Eau de Russe and Town & Country. Other products by Crown included air fresheners and cherry toothpaste.

Despite it's innovations and high reputation, Crown's success dwindled after the death of Thomson Sr. and the start of World War I. The company was sold to Lever Brothers (now Unilever) for £300,000. Under Lever, Crown's resources were turned to making hair products rather than perfume, and in 1939 the company was closed. 

 


 

CASPERS WHISKEY ~  MADE BY HONEST NORTH CAROLINA PEOPLE

Always wanted one of these since i started collecting and never had the chance to pick one up it seems. This is a great example of this sought after bottle.

John L. Casper was a third Generation whiskey maker. His grandfather started outside of Winston- Salem around 1861. He would fire up the still that was on the farm and distilled whiskey for family use. John's father would serve four years in the confederate army. When his father return home from the war he and Johns grandfather would expand the small distillery and sell their product locally for several decades. John L. Casper would take over the distillery in the 1890s.

John L. Casper with help from friends and a promotional brochure he wrote to attract investors. Selling liquor direct by mail order. He would incorporate the business in 1900 and call it The Casper Company. He also would name himself president of the company.

Casper started with about a dozen stills. He also negotiated with two other distillers in Yadkin and Davis Counties to take their entire production . By 1905 The Casper Company was worth 250,000.00 dollars. He would have a full city block building built in Winston-Salem and proclaim that the firm was a distiller, rectifiers, wholesalers and a local outlet for Milwaukee's Pabst Beer.

Casper would market his whiskey in a cobalt color glass bottle with an attractive fluted neck. Bottle embossed CASPER'S WHISKEY / MADE BY HONEST / NORTH / CAROLINA PEOPLE. (Text from Bottle Pickers.com  (c) Frank Wicker)
 

 
 
 
HOPKINS CHALYBEATE WATER { Graphite Pontil } ~ BALTIMORE,MD.
HOPKINS' CHALYBEATE WATER

This Water is obtained from a well upon the farm of Mr.William Hopkins, in Baltimore County, Maryland, within 15 miles of the City of Baltimore, and 1 mile of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Rail Road. The well was dug in 1855, and is 80 feet deep ; the Water standing within 8 feet of the surface of the earth. Numerous experiments made in order to test the supply of Water, only confirm the
opinion that it is inexhaustible.
The soil in which the well is dug, is a tenacious Red Clay, variegated with frequent strata of Magnesian Earth, and the Water rises through the original Sand Stone Rock. Its temperature when drawn from the well is 52° Far.
This Water has been extensively used by invalids for nearly two years, and has acquired great celebrity as a cuarative in Dyspepsia, loss of Appetite, Indigestion, Extreme Debility, and in various Atonic and Anemic conditions; through the instrumentality of those who have been signally benefited by its use.
Its most prominent ingredients "1 Carbonate of Protoxyd according to a recent qualitative y of Iron, and analysis are, j Free Carbonic Acid Gas.
It also contains . . . Carbonate of Magnesia, Chloride of Magnesium, Chloride of Potassium, Chloride of Calcium, Carbonate of Lime, a trace, And what is very remarkable, no Sulphur. A Water combining such ingredients will at once be recognized by Physicians as a valuable Remedial Agent, and being pleasant to the taste, and no ingredient contra-indicating its use as a common drink, it will doubtless become a popular Beverage.

DIRECTIONS FOR USE.

The entire contents of a bottle may be drank before breakfast, and the same quantity, if desired, before dinner
or at bed-time ; thus used it has been found to give tone to the stomach, and to improve digestion to a remarkable extent.
The opinions of some of our most eminent Physicians, and other prominent citizens are annexed, and will abun
dantly establish what is herein stated.
To meet the constantly increasing demand for the Water, the subscriber has perfected arrangements involving a large outlay of capital, which will enable him promptly to fill orders to any amount. The Water is bottled at the well in new bottles, made expressly for it, branded "Hopkins' Chalybeate, Baltimore," securely corked and copper wired, and will be delivered, free of charge, to all parts of the City, and to the several Eail Road Stations and Steamboats, and will be sold at the following prices, to which he invites the attention of the Community and the Trade.

Terms Cash. Delivered in Baltimore. Per Doz $1 50, For one to five Gross per gross 18 00, 10 "$ ct. off.
For six or more Gross " « 18 00, 15 33 " In Boxes of 2 Doz. 4 Doz. and 6 Doz. each. No Charge for Packages.
37 cents per dozen, ($4 50 per gross,) will be allowed for the empty bottles, packed, and in good order, delivered at my store.
Orders from the City and from a distance, enclosing draft for amount ordered, will receive prompt attention if
addressed to J. V'D. STEWART, Chemist, Sole Agent, S. E. corner Hanover and Camden sts. Baltimore. 
LLEWELLYN PHARMACY ~ 1410 CHESTNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA

COBALT BLUE LLEWELLYN PHARMACY BOTTLE STANDING 6 INCHES TALL, THIS STYLE BOTTLE IS OFTEN REFEREED TO AS THE "PHILADELPHIA DRUGGIST FORM" AS MANY USED IT IN THAT CITY. NOT A RARE BOTTLE BUT A GREAT LOOKING PHARMACY.

 

 

Philadelphia, November 5th 1902
The store property 1512 Chestnut Street has been sold by the Girad Trust Company to William H. Llewellyn for 28,000 dollars subject to a ground floor rent of 6,000 dollars annual to Yettes & Troth. Store front is about 19S-10 feet and depth of 142 feet, making the store front value 6400 dollars a foot.The purchaser also owns 1410 Chestnut Street next to the Land title Building.

1410 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, The first user of this retail space was Llewellyn's Drug Store, which started here in the mid-19th Century and lasted all the way up to 1917 before moving to 1518 Chestnut.

The interior in 1898. After Llewellyn's moved out, a bank was proposed for the space and a design was even drawn by the architect Edgar V. Seeler, but construction never took place. After that, the A.H. Geuting Company Store occupied it, selling shoes and establishing the place as a shoe store. The new facade design was by David Bassett.

W. H. Llewellyn, Philadelphia, has purchased of W. H. Mulford & Co. the drug store at the southwest corner Eighteenth and Market streets, and proposes to make it as complete and^perfect in detail as his well known establishment at 1410 Chestnut street.

. H. K. Mulfobd &; Co.,;Philadelphia, manufacturing chemists, manufacturers of fruit juices, tablet triturates, &c, have sold their drug store at the southwest coiner Eighteenth and Market streets to W. H. Llewellyn of 1410 Chestnut street. Messrs. Mulford & Co. will devote all their attention to their increasing business at their laboratory at 2132 Market street.

RARE WASHINGTON SPRING MINERAL WATER ~ CRUDE PINT KISSINGEN WATER, HANBURY SMITH
ONE OF MY LATEST, WASHINGTON SPRING BALLSTON SPA NEW YORK. IN PERFECT CONDITION HAD ONE AND SOLD IT SO WHEN I GOT THE CHANCE TO TRADE THIS ONE I JUMPED ON IT-ON RIGHT IS VERY CRUDE KISSINGEN WATER HANBURY SMITH IN OLIVE AMBER COLOR PINT SIZE AND PERFECT.
 
 
 
 

THE WASHINGTON SPRING CO. BALLSTON SPA N.Y.

is situated near the railroad embankment in the centre of the village, north and south. This was drilled to a depth of six hundred and twelve feet in the summer of 1868.

The proprietors, Simon B. Conde and John Brown, have recently erected a fine building over the spring, and have a tract of seven acres of land, including a portion of the flat, and extending up the wooded slope to the fair-grounds. Mr. Conde, who has sunk most of these wells in Ballston Spa, has given considerable study to this work, and is understood to have been the author of the article in "Appleton's Encyclopædia" upon artesian wells. His skill and judgment have established for him a wide reputation as a successful operator. The following is the analysis of the water of this spring, and it ought to be added that it was made from a specimen taken before the work was fairly finished, and before it was protected from the intrusion of fresh water, as it is now. A new analysis would show still greater strength and purity:
 
 
 Smith, Samuel Hanbury, 1810-1894


SMITH, SAMUEL HANBURY, New York, was born at Willenhall, Staffordshire, England, Feb. 15th, 1810. In 1831, after at hree years' course, lie was graduated M. D. from University coll., London, taking honors in class of nature and treatment of disease; during the ensuing summer and fall was a student at Angers, France, under Billard, and shortly thereafter established himself in Stockholm, where in 1S34, at the request of the renowned Prof. Berzelius, lie accepted the position of senior phys. to the Cholera hosp. during the great epidemic which afflicted that city dining that year. While residing in Stockholm he was a student in the
Royal med. and chirurg. institute, and from that institution received in 1S40 the degree of chirurgio magislcr. When he determined to emigrate to the United States in 1847, m addition to being unanimously elected a fellow of the Swedish med. soc, of which he had been an active working member for several years, he was presented with a certificate of his graduation as master of surgery from the Royal medico-chirurg. institute of Stockholm, and of his membership in the Royal coll. of health. This certificate, which was signed by every member of the faculty of the institute, highly recommended him to the profession as a man, a scholar and a doctor. Some idea of the estimation in which he was held by the profession in Stockholm may be formed from the fact that Prof. Berzelius arose from a sick-bed to come down to the steamer to bid him farewell; while Prof. Retzius, as long as he lived, maintained an active correspondence with him, and published extracts from Dr. Smith's letters in Hygica, the organ of the med. soc. in Sweden.

ON RIGHT IS SUPER COLOR HANBURY SMITH VICHY WATER IN HALF PINT SIZE
 
After arriving in the United States he practiced successively at Cincinnati, Columbus and Hamilton, Ohio, finally establishing himself in 1859 in New York. During the past fifteen years he has been mainly occupied with the treatment of chronic disease with mineral waters. He is a fellow of the Swedish med. soc.; member of the Ohio State med. soc.; of the New York co. med. soc.; of the Medical Journal asso.; of the acad. of med.; of the acad. of natural sciences; of the public health asso.; of the Am. public health assoc.; of the Am. med. asso., etc. He edited, rewriting much and supplying missing chapters, the second (posthumous) volume of "Drake's Diseases of the Interior Valley of North America," contributed to the New York Medical Times ten papers upon " Mineral Waters," and to the Transactions of the Swcdi-h med soc. an essay (in the Swedish language) upon " Laryngismus Stridulus in Hygila." In 1849 he served as health officer of Cincinnati ; was for some years prof, of the theory and practice of medicine in Starling mcil. coll., and in 1850-51-52 was superintendent of the Ohio State lunatic asylum. He married (1) June 8th, 1840, Emilie Berg, of Stockholm; and (2) March 30th, 1S70, A. E. Victoria Starr, of New York.

By Hanbury Smith, M.D. (The Medical Record, Nov. 1, 1869.)

At a meeting of the New York Academy of Medicine, held Sept. 16th, 1869, Dr. Hanbury Smith read a paper on mineral waters as therapeutic agents. After defining mineral waters as "more or less dilate aqueous solutions, flowing from natural springs, or reached by excavation or boring, and possessed of undeniable medicinal powers," he directed attention to the important part played by the temperature and volume of the solvent water, not forgetting the therapeutic value of the only important gaseous impregnations—carbonic acid and sulphuretted hydrogen. From want of time to treat of them, the so-called alum, bitter, and ferruginous waters were passed over, and might perhaps with propriety be regarded as convenient and varied forms of astringents, laxatives, and tonics, forming a transition series between ordinary medicines and the mineral waters proper. The minerals present in these were next described, and it was shown that all the important ones are exactly those "either forming integral parts of our bodies, or whose presence is absolutely necessary to the accomplishment of the vital processes," certainly a most remarkable coincidence."
 
 
BOURBON WHISKEY BITTERS
 
These bitters prepared of pure old Bourbon Whiskey and possess all its stimulating tonic and medicinal power. Modified and improved in its action on the system by the addition of many simple alternative and bitter tonics making them invaluable. A remedy in the treatment of lung complaints, bronchitis, dyspepsia, liver complaints and general debility and weakness of the system.Bourbon Whiskey Bitters,  A wine glassful should be taken before each meal. Ladies and children should begin with less quantity and increase. As an agreeable stomach these bitters are unsurpassed.
 
 
 

TRIMBLE & BUCK DRUGGISTS, CROWN POINT CENTRE N.Y.
Here is a great strap side that is more yellow than picture and considered quite scarce. Embossed: TRIMBLE & BUCK DRUGGISTs CROWN POINT CENTRE N.Y.
 
 
TRIMBLE & BUCK ~ DRUGGISTS
 
 
The firm of Trimble & Buck carry on a general store in a building which was erected in 1866 by P.S. Russell. The first firm was Russell & Trimble; then Russell, Trimble & Co., and Trimble & Buck since 1869. The firm is composed of James K. Trimble, who is a son of Chillion A. Trimble one of the early settlers already mentioned, who located on the Point, and Rawson C. Buck
Rawson Clark Buck  married Emma Adel Myrlck, Sept, 15, 1868, at Bridport, Vt., and settled at Crown point Centre, where he now resides; a merchant; a member of the (Inn of Trimble & Buck, and has been quite successful.
Has one child - Almkdia Milly (Buck), b. June 12, 1870
 
Two forts were built (c. 1731) near the current location of the town, Fort St. Frédéric by the French and later Fort Crown Point by the British.

During colonial times and the American Revolutionary War, its strategic location often made Crown Point an important location. Situated on the west shore of Lake Champlain about 15 miles north of Fort Ticonderoga it provided a fortified position about a day's travel north of that site.

After the failure of the American Invasion of Canada in 1776, it represented the northernmost point of American control. During the British Saratoga Campaign in 1777, General Burgoyne organized a supply magazine here to support his attack of Ticonderoga.

The Town of Crown Point is an original town of the county, established in 1786 before Essex County was created. Parts of Crown Point were used to form the Towns of Elizabethtown (1798) and Willsboro (1788).

The modern settlement of the town began around 1800 with an influx of settlers from Vermont.

Crown Point holds the New York state January record low of -48.

MELVIN & BADGER APOTHECARIES ~ BOSTON, MASS.

FOUND IN MANY DIFFERENT SIZES, THIS ONE IS 6.5 INCHES TALL  AND CALLED AN IRREGULAR HEX SHAPE. PRODUCED BY THE CARL LOWERY GLASS CO.

 

MELVIN & BADGER APOTHECARIES

James S. Melvin, of Boston, Mass., died December 13, 1891. He was born at Georgetown, D. C, March 4, 1820. He began his business career in the apothecary business in the store of David Kimball, Portsmouth, N. IT., being then but 11 years old. He removed to Boston in 1S42, and secured a position with Smith & Fowle. In the course of two or three months this firm was dissolved; Mr. Fowle continued the business, and Mr. Smith formed a co-partnership with a Mr. Perry under the firm name of Smith & Perry. He remained with Seth W. Fowle about two years. In 1844 he obtained a position with Smith & Perry. Mr. Perry retiring in 1847, he was admitted as a partner, the style of the new firm being Smith & Melvin. On January 1, 1865, Mr. Jno. S. Badger was admitted to this firm; on the retirement of Mr. Smith in F'ebruary, 1867, the firm name was changed to Melvin & Badger. The business is still conducted under this title. He retired from business January I, 1885. He was one of the oldest members of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, also a leading member of the " Boston Druggists' Association." He was a man of sterling character and was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. Deceased was one of the old members of our Association, having connected himself with it in 1853, at Boston.

PARKE DAVIS & CO. MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS DETROIT
PARKE DAVIS & COMPANY, DETROIT MICHIGAN
 
 
By the end of the Civil War Detroit was a prosperous and bustling city. The completion of the locks and canal at Sault Ste. Marie in 1855 had opened the way for transporting the iron ore and copper from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to the markets in the east. By 1860 Michigan was the largest producer of iron ore and copper in North America (1). Both of these products were critical in the North’s victory in the Civil War, and the mining and transport of these materials was highly profitable.In Detroit gracious homes lined the tree-shaded streets which led into Woodward Avenue, and the most prosperous citizens were building mansions on estates along the river off of East Jefferson Boulevard.
Times had not proven to be that prosperous, however,for Dr. Samuel Duffield, who owned a small drug store at the corner of Gratiot and Woodward Avenues.The experience of the Civil War and the large
number of people moving west had demonstrated the need for a greater supply of medicinal preparations (2). So in 1862 Dr. Duffield had begun to make a number of items in larger amounts than required for his own use and to sell them to other pharmacists and doctors. Dr. Duffield’s store was strictly a one-man operation, and most nights found him working late in the crowded laboratory in the back of his store. Here he had a still that could produce two barrels of alcohol a day and presses for making extracts. In the Detroit City Directory he advertised ether, sweet spirits of nitre, liquid ammonium,Hoffman’s anodyne, mercurial ointment, etc. But the shipping service to Detroit was poor and potential customers in the major population centers in the east were skeptical of any company located in what they considered to be a backwoods town. Consequently, it was difficult to find anyone to extend credit or to invest in such a business.
Then in 1866 Dr. Duffield met Hervey C. Parke who was interested in starting a new business. Hervey Parke was 38 years old. He had managed a copper mine and then owned a successful hardware store in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. In 1865 he sold his store and moved his wife and two children back to Detroit because of the better business opportunities there. On October 26, 1866, the partnership of Duffield and Parke was formed, and this event is recognized as the beginning of Parke-Davis and Company. Part I 1866-1900 Soon the increased competition of the eastern drug firms made the new partners realize the necessity of finding someone who could promote and sell their products. So
in 1867 a young, ambitious, wholesale drug salesman was brought into the firm as the third partner. This was
George S. Davis, the son of a prominent Detroit resident. After high school he chose going into business rather than attending college. He was only 22 when he joined the partnership, but he had already established himself as an outstanding salesman. Although sales continued to expand, new troubles kept appearing. Dr. Duffield’s health began to fail and he needed to spend more time with his wife who had become seriously ill. In time, Dr. Duffield became disheartened and withdrew from the business in order to go into private practice as a physician. So in 1871 Parke and Davis became the owners of the company that was to bear their name for the next century. Hervey Parke and George Davis had very different personalities. Where the former was quiet, gray bearded, and dignified, the latter was young, flamboyant, and full of ideas for increasing their business. Under their direction the company entered an era of unprecedented growth. Both men were committed to the belief that the high quality of their products was a major selling point, and the motto Medicamenta Vera or truth in medicine,first adopted by Dr. Duffield, continued to be one of their major concerns.In order to gain both publicity and new products, Davis began sending expeditions to far-off corners of the world to collect various plants used by the native peoples. Starting in 1871 expeditions were sent into the
wilds of Central and South America, Mexico, the Pacific Northwest, the West Indies, and the Fiji Islands.Over a twenty-year period, Parke-Davis introduced 50 new drugs, and most of these proved to be of sufficient value to be recognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia.Probably the most familiar product, Cascara Sagrada, introduced in 1876, is still used today.The best-documented expedition financed by Parke-Davis was that of Henry H. Rusby, who recorded his adventures in a book called Jungle Memories. Rusby
had just received his medical degree from New York University, and he was hired by Parke-Davis as a botanist and pharmacognosist. Late in the fall of 1884 George Davis asked him how soon he could leave for Bolivia because he wanted to obtain a large supply of coca leaves so that this drug could be investigated. Rusby quickly gathered up all the equipment that he might need and by January was on a boat headed to South America. He was just 22 years old and setting out alone on a trip that would take two years.He would cross the Isthmus of Panama and travel down the rough western coast of South America to Bolivia. From here he would cross the Andes and then travel the length of the Amazon River from its western tributaries to the Atlantic Ocean. While in the Bolivian jungles Rusby kept hearing reports about the bark of a mystery tree called cocillana which was reported to possess a remarkable range of therapeutic uses. Finally a native identified this mysterious tree and Rusby immediately had it cut down and its bark removed and dried. In order to test the properties he administered a small amount to one of his native companions and it produced an increase of mucus in the mouth and throat. A double dose was then given to two other natives with similar results. Thus encouraged, Rusby again doubled the dose and took it himself. The result was nausea, pallor, and an abundance of thin watery mucus from the nose.Based on these findings and what information he could gather, Rusby considered that this drug had properties similar to those of ipecac and that it had commercial possibilities. So he hired natives to gather 600 pounds of this bark which was then packed, carried over the mountains, and shipped back to Detroit. In the late 1800s Parke-Davis supplied a group of leading physicians with samples of new products and little pamphlets called Working Bulletins. These publications provided all the known information about the preparations and their physiological effects. In turn the physicians were invited to report their experience with the drug, which would then appear in later issues. It is interesting to note that Cocillana bark was listed in the 1888 catalog just two years after Rusby sent back the first sample.Cocillana never
replaced ipecac but eventually was utilized in cough preparations, and Rusby received a royalty of 10 cents per pound of bark. The first manufacturing plant was located in downtown Detroit, but by 1873 the rapidly increasing demand for Parke-Davis products made it necessary to build new manufacturing facilities at Joseph Campeau Street and
the Detroit River. This location would be the home of Parke-Davis for the next century. There were two major manufacturing operations; extracting plant materials and rolling pills
. By 1874 the Parke-Davis catalog listed 254 types of fluid extracts, 300 types of sugar coated pills, 74 solid extracts, 53 concentrations,46 medicinal elixirs, 23 medicinal syrups, 15 medicinal wines, 8 alkaloids, and chloroform (6).Because additional money was needed to finance the expansion, Davis had the job of trying to encourage
Detroit businesses to invest in the company. But money was tight following the recession of 1873 and so it was not until January 14, 1875 that Parke-Davis and Company became a corporation under Michigan law. Parke was the president while Davis was the general manager, and there were three other stockholders who had paid in capital totaling about $82,000. By 1876, exactly 10 years after Duffield and Parke had joined forces, the company reported its first profit of $5,264.65 and Parke-Davis had become Detroit’s largest
industry next to manufacturing stoves. During this period George Davis was the real driving force. In addition to selling, he managed the production and laboratory facilities; if salesmen were needed, he trained them. Most importantly, his restless genius was responsible for a number of brilliant and farsighted decisions that would result in Parke-Davis becoming one of the most respected pharmaceutical companies in the world by the turn of the century. One of the major problems encountered by the pharmacists and physicians at that time was the variation in the strengths of the prepared medicinal extracts on the market. These could range from being worthlessly weak to death threateningly strong. Obviously, the drug manufacturers wanted to avoid the possibility of their products killing anyone, so they tended to err on the weak side. Consequently, most doctors felt more secure in either compounding the drugs themselves or dealing with a pharmacist they knew and trusted. Davis was keenly aware of this situation and hired a chemist to work on the problem. In 1879 a process for standardization by chemical assay was developed, and the first standardized medicinal drug in history was placed on the market. This led to a systematic investigation of standardizing other liquid formulations and in 1883 Parke-Davis announced a list of twenty such normal liquids (7).
By the early 1890s medical research scientists began to realize th potential usefulness of animal as a source of new medicinals. Parke-Davis was quick to begin research in this new field and in 1893 introduced desiccated thyroid gland as a treatment for glandular disorders. Because the new biological materials did not lend themselves to chemical standardization, in 1897 Parke-Davis introduced the idea of physiological standardization in which the effect of the drug in test animals was quantified. Two decades later over 1,100 Parke-Davis products would be standardized by these methods. Other pharmaceutical companies recognized the significance of standardization and developed methods
of their own so that over a relatively short period of time this principle was adopted by the whole industry. However, Parke-Davis’ leadership and diligence were widely recognized
and appreciated. In order to maintain standards it was also necessary to establish quality control. Thus, in 1886 Parke-Davis initiated the practice of using lot numbers on the labels of all their products. Since that time every item produced has carried its own control number. This number is the key to the complete history of the product and each ingredient used in its manufacturing including the source and testing. It was not until 1962 that the FDA required all drug manufacturers to do this. By 1890 Parke-Davis was a successful and prosperous company. It had finally succeeded in breaking into the competitive eastern market, and a full-scale manufacturing operation was built in Walkerville, Ontario, to take care of that business. In the same year a Parke-Davis branch was established in London, England, in order to enable the company to extend its sales to Europe. New buildings were also going up on the waterfront property, and the number of employees was steadily increasing. A big bicycle shed was built on Jos. Campeau to shelter all of the bicycles which were the favorite form of transportation. Parke-Davis employed a large number of women, especially in the Capsule and
Finishing Departments. The women wore long anklelength skirts fashionable in that era, protected by starchy aprons brought from home. Work started at 7:00 a.m. and ended at 5:30 p.m.; and on Saturday everyone worked from 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. All of the capsules were handmade and the rate of pay for hand trimming and joining capsules was 8¢ per thousand. A top operator could earn up to 80¢ a day. It was at this time that George Davis met a young Japanese chemist, Jokichi Takamine, who had come to the United States to try and interest the distilling industry in a potent starch-splitting enzyme that he had developed. Davis was impressed and immediately hired him as a consultant. Taka Diastase was marketed in 1895 as a digestive aid and became very popular. Once again Davis’ intuitive ability to recognize talent was evident,because in 1900 Takamine isolated adrenaline and was part of the team working in the Parke-Davis laboratory that identified the chemical structure. Later, after returning to Japan, Takamine became the first president of Sankyo. Because of this common bond a close relationship has existed between the two companies since that time. In 1894 the German scientist, Emil Behring, and
the French scientist, Emile Roux, announced the discovery
of an antitoxin for the treatment of diphtheria. George Davis immediately realized that it would bring tremendous prestige to his company if such an antitoxin could be produced commercially because at that time diphtheria was one of the most deadly of the common diseases. Moving quickly, he recruited two scientists from the University of Michigan to set up the first commercial biological laboratory in this country. On March 19, 1895, a Detroit physician administered a shot of Parke-Davis diphtheria antitoxin to an ailing company employee. This marks the first time that a commercially produced serum was given to anyone in the United States. Two years later Antistreptococcic and Antitetanic serums were marketed. In fact, the serums and vaccines that were developed in this biological laboratory were to provide the bulk of the sales for the next twentyfive years. It is ironic that just at the time that Parke-Davis was doing so well and George Davis was making decisions and initiating actions that would shortly make it
the most successful pharmaceutical company in the world, the personal life of Davis became chaotic and tragic. As the business prospered the lives of the two partners grew apart. Hervey Parke still quietly took care of the finances. Around Detroit he was known as a successful, conservative man and a philanthropist. On the other hand, George Davis remained a bachelor although he was said to be an ardent admirer of beautiful women. He owned a big mansion on East Jefferson and a 500 acre farm on the lakefront where he kept his racehorses. He had a luxurious yacht for sailing on Lake St. Clair, and he was a well-known and popular figure around Detroit where he entertained lavishly. A
great admirer of Napoleon Bonaparte, Davis had an extensive collection of relics of Napoleon. He also liked to collect rare first editions and by 1886 he owned a library of more than 5,000 books. He became intrigued by the prospects of California real estate and invested large sums of money, and this proved to be his undoing. In 1893 business was booming and then suddenly the bottom dropped out of the market. The failure of British banks had caused British investors to unload American securities for cash, the result being a drain of gold reserves. This caused Americans to become apprehensive and to start withdrawing their savings from the banks. In turn hundreds of banks failed, thousands
of businesses closed, and hundred of thousands of people were thrown out of work all across the country. The great panic of 1893 was on. In the resulting depression Parke-Davis suffered only a minor setback, but George Davis’ heavy investment in California land proved to be a catastrophe. He lost vast sums of money, and in order to cover some of his losses, he drew on Parke-Davis for more money than he was due. Naturally, the stockholders objected. Although Hervey Parke, the president, stood by his partner through the resulting storm, eventually it was necessary to ask Davis to resign. After almost 30 years of service, his stock was turned in as partial payment of his indebtedness and he was given a leave of absence. In order to pay off his debts Davis sold his mansion, his farm, his beloved Napoleon collection, his yacht, and even his racehorses. From the time that he had started with a salary of $60 a month until his resignation in November, 1896, this unusual man had allowed over a million dollars to slip through his fingers. Suddenly after 30 years of hard work and brilliant leadership, everything was gone. In 1903 he was forced to declare bankruptcy, and at that time the Board of Directors voted him a special pension in recognition of his many contributions. He lived quietly in various rooming houses and seemed to have no regrets. He seldom mentioned Parke-Davis but often talked about the beautiful racehorses he had owned. He died in 1930 at the age of 85 and only a few people attended the short burial service in Elmwood Cemetery.
After George Davis was forced to leave the firm,Hervey Parke continued as president, but was less and less active in the actual management because of poor health. The prominent Detroiters who had bought Davis’ stock were named to the Board of Directors, and other names appeared more and more frequently in the company records. Then on February 8, 1899, Hervey Parke died. At his funeral in Detroit’s St. John’s Episcopal Church the large sanctuary was so crowded that special seating had to be reserved because all the leaders of Detroit’s business and social life were present. So, we come to the end of an era. Over the period of slightly more than 30 years the efforts of two men
working in concert had directed the development of a pharmaceutical company from obscurity to a position of international prominence. Indeed, by the spring of 1904 Parke-Davis proudly proclaimed itself to be The World’s Largest Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Concern. The middle of the 19th century was the time for pharmaceutical pioneers. Familiar names like Merrill, Lilly, Squibb, and Warner all date back to this period. It also marked the beginning of systematic research in the field of medicine. Thus, in 1864 Louis Pasteur proved that airborne microbes caused fermentation and putrefaction. In turn this work stimulated Lister to experiment with antiseptic agents, and this ushered in the modern age of surgery. But the amazing success of Parke-Davis and Co. must be attributed to Davis’ ability to recognize the importance of the new discoveries and to find
a way to capitalize on the new possibilities. At the same time Hervey Parke managed to balance the enthusiasm of his young partner with a sense of reality and to keep the company financially solvent during some very turbulent times. The single most important contribution to their success, however, was the development of standards of purity and strict adherence to maintaining the quality of their products. The favorable publicity that resulted was the basis of Parke-Davis’ international reputation, and as this reputation grew so did sales.
The beginning of the 20th century marked the start of a new era for Parke-Davis and for the United States. The automobile had arrived. In Detroit the police posted speed limits of 8 miles per hour in order to halt reckless driving. The popular Theodore Roosevelt as President was busy reforming the government of the United States. The leading sentiment of the time was There’s nothing wrong with society that the government can’t fix. Under Roosevelt America was becoming a world power and there was recognition that human rights were as important as the rights of property. Americans had a new sense of pride in themselves and their country. Most of all, everyone was enjoying prosperity.
The founders of Parke-Davis were replaced by new leaders, but everything else remained the same. Since the company was so successful there was no need to risk being a pioneer and to blaze new trails. With sales continuing to grow the name Parke-Davis was recognized throughout the world as being associated with the highest quality productsavailable. In no way did the new managers want to lose this reputation. So from 1900-1930 subsequent managers were able to maintain Parke-Davis’ preeminent position by expanding upon that which the two partners had started. Thus, the first commercial biological laboratory that George Davis had established in 1894 was a major contributor to this success. In the lab that started with three horses and a few guinea pigs, the number of horses rapidly increased to several hundred. The company leased two large stables adjoining their river front property from the Detroit
United Railway System, but soon these were overcrowded.The city of Detroit was also expanding so that the Parke-Davis property was gradually surrounded by residential areas. So it was a very popular decision in 1907 when the company purchased a large farm near Rochester, Michigan, and started moving all of the animals out there. The animals at Parkedale were probably the best fed and cared for in the world. Horses were required for the production of serums used against diphtheria, tetanus, and gangrene. During World War I there was a tremendous demand for Antitetanic Serum and ultimately over 600 horses were kept on the farm. The period leading up to World War I was a happy time for the more than 3,000 employees of Parke-Davis. There were company picnics and boat excursions. There were social clubs and dances, bowling leagues and company sponsored athletic teams. The company pioneered a profit sharing and old age pension plan. There was a general feeling of being a member of a big, happy family; and a strong mutual sense of loyalty developed between the company and its employees that would last for almost fifty years. In 1927 F. O. Taylor, who was Chief Chemist at the time, wrote, Long years of service by those in both high and humble positions gives to Parke-Davis and Company an espirit de corps of immeasurable value and assurance that
replacement in the ranks shall fully carry on, and indeed improve, the traditions of the past . This company spirit was certainly helpful in the difficult times resulting from the depression that followed the stock market crash of 1929. All of the employees agreed to a cut in pay so that no one was laid off. Profits were down but the company’s record of never missing a dividend since the first one in1878 was maintained . But because of the focus on traditions the company began to fall slowly behind its competitors in sales. This trend continued until 1946 when a soil sample collected from a field in Venezuela yielded an unusually active antibiotic, Chloromycetin. This unique substance showed outstanding activity against typhus and typhoid fever. The structure was quickly identified, and the small group of organic chemists was successful in synthesizing the compound. The development of this drug was accomplished in a remarkably short period of time. By 1949 Chloromycetin was released to the medical profession, and within three years the sales of this product alone totaled $120 million. The company had regained its premier position in the US. By 1952 there was an increasing number of reports of hypoplastic anemias following the administration of Chloromycetin. At this time over eight million people had been treated successfully with this drug, and there had been remarkably little sign of any toxicity. But concern about this problem resulted in the council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association issuing a report to the Committee on Research and appointing a subcommittee on blood dyscrasias in June,1952 . This was followed up by a report of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry in 1954 , which advised the restriction of the use of chloramphenicol to the treatment of typhoid fever and other infectious diseases caused by organisms resistant to other antibiotics. The sales that initially plummeted in 1952 gradually increased so that by 1960 Parke-Davis once again led all US pharmaceutical companies in sales. As the onslaught of bad publicity continued, the sales of Chloromycetin in the US gradually dwindled to almost nothing. By 1961 Parke-Davis was in a downward spiral. The expansion brought about by the success of Chloromycetin had resulted in higher fixed costs, and there were no new products available to ease the pressure. Finally, a hostile takeover bid by Revlon forced the Board of Directors to consider alternative buyers of the company. They settled on the New Jersey conglomerate,Warner-Lambert, which purchased Parke-Davis in 1970. The merger was finalized in 1974. Today the old Parke-Davis plant at Joseph Campeau and the Detroit River has been converted into a big riverfront complex of apartment buildings, shopping center, hotels, and upscale office buildings. The name Parke-Davis now identifies the ethical pharmaceutical division of the Warner Lambert corporate family. This division includes the former Parke-Davis research facility in Ann Arbor and the manufacturing plant at Holland, Michigan.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The author thanks the staff of the Parke-Davis Research Library in Ann Arbor for their suggestions and help. The best source of information on this subject was from the following material published in house by Parke-Davis: Parke-Davis 1866-1966, A Backward Glance, Parke-Davis Review, P. Walker, Ed., Parke-Davis and Co., 1966, 23, No. 1-9. Parke-Davis at 100, Parke-Davis and Co., 1966. This booklet was distributed to all stock holders.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR Milton L. Hoefle, Ph.D., University of Minnesota with W. M. Lauer, began working for Parke, Davis and Co. in 1953 in Detroit. In 1959 he moved to the new research laboratories in Ann Arbor and remained there until retiring in 1986 as director of Cardiovascular Chemistry.
JAMES L. BISPHAM ~ PHILADELPHIA

I'm going to call this beauty rare as people who dig privies in this area (Baltimore & Philadelphia) have told me you don't see them. Embossed "JAMES L. BISPHAM  No 710 So. 2d St PHILADa." Beautiful teal green and over 8 inches tall.

 James L. Bispham - Birth:about 1835 - Pennsylvania Spouse Mary P. Bisfahan
Residence:1880 - Philadelphia,Pennsylvania

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, AND OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY AND CHEMISTRY OF THE MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE
Bispham, James L.class of 1854
James L. Bispham was the son of Samuel and Maria Stokes Bispham.
He was born December 19, 1833, on Filbert Street west of Eighth Street, Philadelphia. He attended school in Philadelphia and later at Lawrenceville, New Jersey, graduating in 1850 and delivering the valedictory address.

He learned the drug business with Bullock and Crenshaw, and later attended the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and graduated with the class of 1854. He at once joined the College. At the time of his death he was the oldest member of the College in point of membership, being a member for sixty-four years. He carried on the drug business at 710 South Second Street from 1854 to 1892. (This was the place of business of Peter Williamson, one of the founders of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy.) He was a director in the Southwark National Bank and a vestryman of Saint Andrew's Protestant Episcopal Church. In 1859 he was married to Mary Palmer, of Richmond, Virginia. One daughter survives, Mrs. Elizabeth P. Townsend.

He died April 3, 1918, and was buried in the churchyard of Trinity Church, Moorestown, New Jersey.

 ST DRAKES 1860 PLANTATION BITTERS

MINT 4 LOG DRAKES 

My latest find an undamaged (4 log) i got through a lead on my site out of a 4 ft. across round stone lined cistern under a barn floor & also one whole Hostetters, everything else was smashed.(Hostetters,saratoga mineral parts,dish fragments galore) A one time deal per the elderly woman that owns the barn/property and only allowed because her daughter talked her into it as i had sold her a local med. bottle that was her husbands great grand fathers business in Albany. (2 hr 45 min drive, White River VT.).I went there knowing it was under a barn floor...did not think it would be that bad, i was wrong it was stupid dangerous and no where to put any diggings once in there but could see glass in there through floor. Less than 2 ft between floor beams (one dead center over hole with 2 " thick floor boards that could not be removed so slid under from outside in) (hand hewn 24" +/- square) and top of rocks and caving in as slide in backwards with a knotted Nimo rope,12-14 ft down and pitch black but dry !!. never been so nervous doing anything and stupidly was alone. One time visit for me even if i could go back i wouldn't, to old for that anymore,(well..not alone anyway and only if allowed to pull floor up) i even left my shovel/spade and light in there as i had to point it up as to see to climb out..Her daughter is going to take a picture for me and send it of the view through floor boards as to give an idea of what prompted me to go in there in the first place...you could see bottles (Saratoga types, broke, but still...) The woman who is 87 said it had not been used as long as she could remember as the barn was built in 1882.She thought most of what was in there was from original house that had been destroyed in late1870s area. I have always liked Drakes and never thought i would ever find one, have had 4 but all were traded/bought, this one i will keep as i will always recall what i had to do to get it and how excited i was when i saw my light shine on it.

 

"S. T.—1860—X" are the cabalistic characters which advertise to an admiring, and astonished, and love-to-be-humbugged world—one of the most successful impositions of the day. One can hardly open a newspaper without seeing "Drake's Plantation Bitters" displayed in conspicuous capitals. Wherever we travel we are obliged to notice, on every smooth-faced rock a solitary brand by the way side, the inevitable " S. T.—1860—X, Drake's Plantation Bitters." Now all quack nostrum-venders perfectly understand, that the sale of their stuff is exactly proportioned to the extent of their advertising, and that the benefit of advertising depends entirely on the extent to which it catches the public eye. Nobody pretends to believe a tenth part of what is asserted with regard to the wonderful virtues of their specifics; but nine-tenths of the people believe, that on the principle that where there is much smoke there must be some fire, the more a given medicine is advertised, and puffed, and displayed, and sworn to, the more virtue there must be in it. Hence, all that an enterprizing empiric has to do in order to realize a fortune, is to advertise in a way to ensure attention. Thus, if Drake, Townsend, Brandreth, Moffatt, Holloway, Hostetter, Wolfe, or any other vender of sweetened alcohol, dietetic gin, or patent perpendicular purging potencies, can expend five hundred thousand dollars a year in advertising, and can thereby sell six hundred thousand dollars' worth of his cure-all, the cost of which will not exceed fifty thousand dollars, he will realize a clear fifty thousand dollars' profit, and, in a few years, become a millionaire, and move in the "first circles" of society.

So far as we can judge from evidences of advertising, Drake is just now distancing all of his competitors in this type of traffic. What the "S. T.—1860—X," which heralds his nostrum to the dear public may mean, nobody seems to know, and probably nobody cares. The less people understand of the nature or qualities of drug-remedies, the more they run after them the world over. It is enough for the proprietor of the plantation bitters to advertise in tho silliest manner possible, and he will be sure to catch the greater number of customers. With tho masses of the people, "the greater the absurdity the more implicit the faith." If they knew precisely what made the charm of plantation bitters, they would not patronize the cunning Mr. Drake at all. They would purchase the raw materials and make their own bitters at a saving of several hundred per cent. The liquor could be had at the first grog-shop, and the seasonings at any grocery or drug-shop, and the article compounded at one tenth tho expense.

We must, however, do Mr. Drake the justice to say, that in lauding his hitters as the panacea for all the ills that flesh is heir to, he is hut responding to a demand on the part of the public. The demand for alcoholic stimulus is increasing rapidly. Alcoholic medication is everywhere extending under the auspices of the medical profession. It is even being extensively introduced by regular physicians as a preventive of disease. "Wolfe, Reed, Charles, Messenger, Suit, and others are flooding the land with favorite brands of gin, and superior "old Bourbon" whiskey, to say nothing of lager-beer breweries which are rising among us like mushrooms of a night. But there is one objection to the general, the almost universal, use of these forms of grog medicine. There is a prejudice with many people against "spirituous and malt liquors, wine and cider," except as a medicine. The temperance people and the teetotal abstainers have created, to some extent, a public sentiment against resorting to alcoholic liquors, under the names of rum, brandy, gin, whiskey, &c., except in cases of extreme indisposition—real sickness. The dealers in alcoholic drinks wish to sell them not only as medicine to cure sickness, and prophylactics to prevent sickness, but also as an elixir vita to renovate weak constitutions, invigorate strong ones, impart vitality, prolong longevity, &c., &c. In short it is the interest of all dealers in intoxicating medicines to have all sorts of people purchase them for all possible purposes, and resort to them on all conceivable occasions.

Patrick Henry Drake and Demas Barnes formed a partnership in i862 or 1862 to manufacture and market Drake's Plantation Bitters. In 1867 Barnes and Drake dissolved their partnership and Plantation Bitters was transferred to P.H. Drake & Company, with the dies to the horizontal Barnes stamps. The two-cent and four-cent dies were altered to include the new name and a picture of the distinctive log-cabin bottle Plantation Bitters was sold in.

The two-cent stamps were issued from January, 1869 through June 21, 1871. 55,128 were printed on old paper. The four-cent stamps were issued from January, 1869 through March, 1875. 1,341,142 were printed on old paper, and 657,152 on silk paper. The copy above is on old paper.

 

But we have religious and temperance newspapers (and now and then a temperance physician), which have conscientious scruples about advertising grog-remedies for all diseases under the names of gin, whiskey, &c.; and it is very desirable to have these mediums of communication with the public on the part of the grog venders. Indeed one such journal or physician is worth half a dozen of those who make no pretentions to moral and religious convictions, or to physiological principles. And herein Drake has made a hit. He does not advertise "cordial gin," nor "Scheidam Schnapps," nor "Bourbon," but "litters," and lo! the temperance papers advertise it, the temperance doctors recommend it, and temperance people swallow it.

A clergyman writes from Vermont:

"Dr. Trall: I see the papers, even those that claim to be true to temperance, as the New York Independent, for example, are giving large place in their advertising columns to Dr. Drake's 'Plantation Bitters.' Will you please tell your readers, at a distance, the true character

of the bitters. Are they simply a 'patent medicine' to drug the sick? Or are they a substitute for rum, whiskey, &c., to catch those who do not like to be esteemed * drinkers?'

 Do you know the meaning of S.T. 1860.X? Among the most plentiful encased postage stamps issued as monetary substitutes in 1862, when coins were hoarded and rarely found in circulation, are those issued to advertise Drake’s Plantation Bitters. Put up in log-cabin shaped bottles, the nostrum was mainly alcohol, and was said to cure just about every affliction known to the human race. The subject of much speculation was the inscription at the top of the reverse “S.T. 1860 X.” What did it mean?

Col. Patrick Henry Drake, formulator and promoter of Drake’s Plantation Bitters, explained the inscription in an edition of his almanac, Morning, Noon and Night:

“S.T. 1860.X., like the initials on the old Roman banners, has a meaning. It represents St. Croix—S.T. being the conventional equivalent of Saint, and 1-8-6-0 standing for the letters C-R-O-I, and so forming, with the concluding X, the word CROIX.  “Nothing can be more simple, or, it may be, more appropriate. St. Croix Rum is a stimulating basis of the Plantation Bitters, and it is, therefore in accordance with the fitness of things, that St. Croix should be the basis of their business shibboleth.”

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Images from an early drakes advertising card
SCHULTZ & WARKER N.Y. CARLSBAD

 My pint size SCHULTZ & WARKER (CARLSBAD)  NY mineral water, click on link for a booklet published by them

 

SCHULTZ & WARKER BOOKLET

 

Mr. Carl, H. Schultz was born at Jutroschin-on-the-Orla, in the Province of Posen, on the 2nd of October, 1827. He began his education at the schools of his native town. In 1840 he entered the schools at Krotochin, and later the gymnasium of Lissa. From there he went to the University of Breslau, from which he graduated in 1849. Being particularly fond of chemistry and natural philosophy, he continued the study of these branches for some time after the regular course was finished.

While in the tertiary course in the gymnasium, although only thirteen years of age, he gave private instructions in mathematics and later in chemistry.

In 1853, during the World's Fair in New York, he came to America, bringing with him very little money, but some strong letters of recommendation, and was not long in finding employment. His first situation was with the late Professor Benjamin Silliman, who had charge of the Chemical Department of the Exposition. Later he was appointed assistant to Dr. John Torrey, Professor of Chemistry at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, then in Crosby street. In 1854 the United States Assay Office appointed Dr. Torrey Chief Assayer, and he at once made Mr. Schultz his assistant. He not being a citizen of the United States was offered as an objection to his appointment, but he overcame this by taking out his first papers, and after the proper time, his second papers. Few men ever felt prouder of their citizenship or could have been more thoroughly American.

While at the Assay Office, besides his routine work of making
gold and silver assays, he found time to do a good deal of investigation in connection with Dr. Torrey, and much valuable work toward improving the methods of assaying. At the same time he did the chemical work for the Manhattan Gas Company,
and the laboratory at 18th Street Station was fitted up under his supervision, and remains to-day, with few alterations, as he left it.

While holding the position at the Medical College in Crosby Street, he lodged in the college building and took his meals in a boarding house in the neighborhood. There he met the late


Thomas Warker, who showed him a French siphon. With his characteristic quickness of perception, he at once saw its advantages for keeping water fresh and sparkling, and especially its value in the sick-room. Believing that the manufacture of artificial mineral waters would be a profitable industry, hebegau making investigations'on the subject.

In 1862 he and Thomas Warker established a business for the production of mineral waters on a small scale, under the firm name of Schultz and Warker, which continued until 1871, when Mr. Schultz bought out Mr. Warker's interest, and has since conducted the business under his own name. In 1871 the business had assumed such proportions that it was necessary to move into larger quarters, and he purchased property on First Avenue and located his factory where the business is still continued.

In 1867 he was sent to Europe to examine into the methods of assaying employed by foreign governments, and on his return he submitted a report, many of the recommendations of which were adopted.

In 1872, after seventeen years of service, he resigned from the Assay Office and also from the Manhattan Gas Co., although he was afterwards many times called upon in consultation in regard to questions of great importance. General Roome, President of the Gas Co., once remarked that Dr. Schultz's opinion was of special value to them, because it carried with it not only thorough scientific knowledge, but sound business judgment as well, and no matter how much pressure was brought to bear upon him, he would not endorse anything until satisfied by investigation of its merit.


As an illustration of his untiring industry and genius for application, I might mention, that for a number of years after establishing his business, he still retained his position in the Assay Office and remained chemist to the Gas Co., any one of which posts would be regarded by many men as quite sufficient for the employment of all their energies.

He was very fond of chemical work, and often regretted that he had not more time to devote to it, and those who have visited the factory, will agree with me that his laboratory is the finest and best equipped in the country. It was fitted up without the slightest regard to expense, and with no restrictions whatever on apparatus or supplies. What a boon it would be to our profession if more of our employers took so much interest in science and provided their chemists with every facility for work.

He was a genial and companiable man, cordial and friendly to all to a degree seldom met with. Especially marked was his consideration and sympathy for those in his employ. His men came to feel that in him they had a good and true friend who would not forsake them, a feeling justified by his many benefactions.

Naturally of a charitable disposition, he not only contributed liberally to public charities, but his private benefactions were both numerous and judicious. Many a man would never have attained the position he now holds, had it not been for Mr. Schultz's timely assistance.

The most lovable side of the man was best seen in his home and in his social relations. He and his wife were most genial hosts and most lavish entertainers when they resided in 140th street, and later at their beautiful home in Murray Hill. He leaves a wife, ten children and seven grandchildren to mourn his loss. The funeral was held at his late residence in Murray Hill on May 31st. The interment was in Long Hill Cemetery, near Summit, about three miles from his home.

Mr. Schultz was a member of the American Chemical Society, New York Academy of Sciences, the College of Pharmacy, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Reform Club, and all the prominent German Clubs in this city.

Mr. Schultz was a man of keen insight, sound judgment, and affectionate and generous disposition. To be counted among his friends was an honor and a privilege

ST. REGIS WATER, MASSENA SPRINGS ~ SYRACUSE SPRINGS EXCELSIOR

ON LEFT IS A TEAL GREEN ST. REGIS WATER FROM MASSENA SPRINGS.( I SHOT THIS ONE WITH FOGGY BACKGROUND TO SHOW COLOR) N.Y.// ON THE RIGHT IS ROOT BEER COLORED SYRACUSE SPRINGS EXCELSIOR.

Massena Springs- Is situated on the north shore of the Raquette River, about one mile southeast of Massena village. The St Regis Indians discovered these springs to the government party sent out to survey the ten townships in the summer of 1785. They described them as water coming out of the ground that smelled bad, where the moose, the deer, and the sick Indian came to lick the water. Game of all kinds at an early day were very plentiful in the vicinity of these springs at all seasons of the year, being attracted to the spot, no doubt, on account of the saline qualities of the water. The analysis of the water, showing its constituents, together with other waters, will be found on page 124. The white people began to use the waters of these springs at an early day, and Spafford, in 1813, mentions them as possessing a reputation for the cure of cutaneous complaints, and that invalids came hither from long distances to partake of these waters. In 1822 Capt. John Polley built the first structures for public accommodation. Six years later the old and well known Harrowgate House was erected by Ruel Taylor for Parsons Taylor. Numerous private dwellings soon followed, and the springs were improved by curbing and a pavilion, also hot and cold shower baths erected. In 1848 Benjamin Phillips became proprietor of the springs, and erected what was long known as the United States Hotel, and which was very popular. This was burned in 1871, and on its site was erected the splendid Hatfield House, at a cost of $75,000. Besides this the Harrowgate House is now kept by W. R. Stearns, who also has charge of the waters of the springs. In addition to these houses the Wheeler is kept by Alonzo Riley, a well conducted and popular house. There are two stores at the Springs, and through the growth of the place and of Massena village the two have become substantially one.

J. CEDARLUND'S & SONS ~ GENUINE CALORIC PUNCH
SEALED MID TO LATE 1800S  J.CEDERLUNDS & SONS GENUINE CALORIC PUNCH FROM LUYTIE BROTHERS (IMPORTERS) NYC.
 
 
Luytie Brothers, Importers of Fine Wines of France, j Germany, Spain, and Portugal, Cognac Brandies, Scotch and Irish Whiskeys; a large Stock of Old Rye and Bourbon Whiskeys held in Europe and here; Warerooms and Cellars, 669 to 575 Broadway, Corner Prince Street; down-town Salesroom, No. 1 Wall Street.—The business was founded by them in 1868, being originally located on Front Street. The rapid enlargement of their trade compelled removal to more commodious premises in Hurray Street, and from whence they removed to West Broadway, corner Duane Street. The volume of their trade and size of their stock were steadily enlarging year by year, and upon the completion of the magnificent building erected by Mr. Astor, corner of Broadway and Prince Street, Messrs. Luyties Brothers occupied their present spacious and attractive premises. Some idea of their magnitude may be gathered when we state that they cover an area of upwards of an acre, the floors being respectively 110x280 feet in dimensions. Their great winevaults here are the most elaborate and extensive in the city, and contain a selected stock of foreign wines of all countries. Their lengthy connection with the business gives them a vast range of practical experience, and they are recognized authorities in the market both as regards price and quality. It is due to the Messrs. Luyties Brothers to state that it is greatly owing to their well-directed efforts that the taste for the pure and delicious wines of France and Germany has been cultivated. No connoisseur can visit their cellars without noticing the great efforts made in this direction by the Messrs. Luyties to cultivate the public taste by offering faultless wines. Luyties' "Grand Royal Sec" champagne can duly be compared with the best high-class champagne imported from Bheims, and connoisseurs appreciate this wine for its delicacy and fragrancy of bouquet. The old-established house of Manskopf-Sarasin, in Frankfort-on-Main, continues to ship to them their famous Kalser-weine, of all grades, seldom equalled and never excelled. In clarets, Burgundies, Hungarian, and Italian wines their large stock comprises wines of the best vintages; their assortment of old bottled wines is a very large one; sherry," old crusted ports," from five to ten years in bottle, all choice wines. Of specialties offered by Messrs. Luyties Brothers we note Peter F. Heering's Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, and Cederlunds Sfiner (Stockholm) Genuine Caloric Punch, which were awarded the Gold Medal at the New Orleans Exhibition, and have a world-renowned reputation. Luyties Brothers are sole agents for the United States for the genuine Boonekamp of Maag Bitter, manufactured and invented by H. Underberg-Albricht, every bottle being protected by their own label as well as that of the manufacturer. The American whiskeys sold by Luyties Brothers have an international reputation, and nowhere can such a fine stock of high-grade whiskeys be found in the United States in rye and bourbon. These whiskeys are mostly made in small distilleries in the old fashioned manner, and are solely selected on their merits. The increase of their business made it necessary to establish a down-town office, No. 1 Wall Street, corner Broadway, which is fitted up in a tasty manner as a down-town salesroom. In connection with it is a retail business, unique in its kind and style. It is the favorite resort for bankers and stock brokers, and is under the courteous and competent management of Mr. F. W. Luyties, who represents the firm. One word about " De Luyties Special Bottlings." Each bottle is protected by " Luyties Patent Netting and Seal" for covering of necks and mouths of bottles, forming the only absolute safeguard against fraud. Only standard qualities of wines and whiskeys, brandies, etc., are bottled by Messrs. Luyties Brothers under this patent. The firm is composed of Gerhard and

Henry Luyties, who have been in partnership nearly a quarter of a century. Messrs. Luyties Brothers are true , to their watch-word and trade-mark of " Veritas." They have built up the leading concern of its kind, adhering rigidly to the fixed principle of handling only the best. The public has not been slow to observe this. The results are of a character highly gratifying to all who encourage the consumption of good wines and fine liquors.
COOK, EVERETT & PENNELL DRUGGIST ~ PORTLAND,MAINE
 
HERE IS MY 8 INCH PLUS TALL AMBER DRUGGIST FROM MAINE "COOK,EVERETT & PENNELL" FROM PORTLAND MAINE, WITH TONS OF SEED BUBBLES BUNCHED UP ABOVE THE MONOGRAM.


Maine Druggists Reorganize.

Some years ago the druggists of Maine were organized into a State association, but interest in the organization was lost and for five years or more no meetings have been held. Last June, at a meeting of the Kennebec Valley Druggists' Association, steps were taken to revive the State association. A committee was appointed to fix a date and arrange for an excursion to Portland. All druggists in the State were invited to attend. July 16 and 17 were the dates fixed. Messrs. J. W. Perkins & Co., and Cook, Everett & Pennell, learning of the intended visit to Portland, wrote to Mr. Bowditch, secretary of the Kennebec Valley Association, offering to entertain the visitors.

Some twenty or more of the druggists, with their ladies, arrived, and a dinner complimentary to the visitors was given in the evening bv the wholesale firms of J. W. Perkins & Co. and Cook, Everett & Pennell at the summer clubhouse of the Portland Club on Diamond Island. A number of city druggists and representatives of the wholesale houses were present. The occasion was entirely informal and every way enjoyable. While the gentlemen were at the islands the ladies of the party were given a carriage drive during the evening.

Thursday morning at 10 o'clock a large number arrived from all over the 3tate. According to instructions they met at the Falmouth Hotel and, accompanied by Chandler's band, proceeded to Custom House wharf, where they were.taken on board the Emita, bound for Long Island. Messrs. Cook, Everett & Pennell and J. W. Perkins & Co., closed their stores. All the clerks went on the excursion, and many of the city druggists were in the party.

More than 50 were present from other places, and about 40 from Portland and vicinity. Music, baseball and other games were indulged in, and were followed by an excellent clambake to the edification and comfort of all.

After the bake, Mr. Edmund Dana, Jr., president of the old Maine Pharmaceutical Association, called the assemblage to order. The charter of the old association has five years more to run, and on its expiration it will be renewed. It is the intention to hold annual reunions for the purpose of bringing the druggists of the State into closer business relations with each other.

These officers were elected ■

President.—Chas. K. Partridge, Augusta.  Vice-President.— A. M. Robinson, Bangor.  Secretary.—H. E. Bowditch, Augusta.  Corresponding Secretary.—H. T. Cummings, Portland.  Treasurer.— F. R. Buck, Skowuegan.

Executive Committee.—Seth Wakefield, Lewiston; Andrew Hallett, Bath; Geo. W. Dorr, Watervllle.    Committee on Drug Market.—Chas. Cook, Portland; Caldwell Sweet, Bangor; J. Henry Crockett, Portland.

Business Committee.—Chas. M. Follansbee, Portland; Otis J. Cook, Auburn; A. W. Pottle, Farmington.

While the druggists were enjoying themselves at the island, the ladies of the visiting druggists, some 15 or 20 in number, were entertained by the wives of the local druggists. They were given a ride about town, and after dinner went down to the islands to join the party there, for the purpose of enjoying the sail down the bay.

The druggists returned from the islands at 4 p.m., and, headed by the band, marched to the Falmouth Hotel, cheering Cook, Everett & Pennell and J. W. Perkins & Co on the way, who had done so much to make the trip a great success.
Cook. Everett and Pennell, Portland. Bluck Contains beechwood creosote, oil of citroFly Lotion. nella, oil of tar, cotton seed oil.  Cook, Everett and Pennell, Portland. Fisherman's Protector. Contains petrolatum, beeswax, oil of tar, oil of citronella, beechwood creosote and camphor.  Cook, Everett and Pennell. Portland. Fish-,Contains beechwood creosote, oil of citroerman's Friend. nella and cottonseed oil.
DIAMOND & LATTICE POISONS

 2 LARGE SIZE DIAMOND & LATTICE POISONS, HAD SET OF 17 OF THESE AND HAD TO PART WITH THEM...THIS IS START TO BUILDING THAT SET BACK. 

The Whitall Tatum Company  In 1806, a man named James Lee opened a glassworks factory in Millville, New Jersey. This glassworks, located on Buck Street in the town of Millville, was later owned by the Whitall Tatum Company. Whitall Tatum would have fourteen owners over the first seventy-five years of its existence.Whitall Tatum, was the first glass factory in America. It operated from the early 1800s through 1938, located in Millville, NJ. The location was ideal for making glass because silica-based sand is plentiful in southern New Jersey, the Maurice River flowing through Millville provided a source of water, and plentiful forests provided energy for industrial processes. The Millville glass works was started in 1806 by James Lee and went through several changes of ownership. In 1838, John M Whitall became a partner in the business. He lived in Philadelphia and worked at the company's headquarters there. In 1845 after his brother Israel Franklin Whitall joined, the firm became Whitall, Brother & Company. Later, Edward Tatum also joined the partnership and in 1857 the name was again changed to Whitall Tatum & Company

REMINGTON-UMC, REM-OIL ~ WINCHESTER ARMS OIL

 

  COUPLE OF MY GUN OIL BOTTLES,REM~OIL REMINGTON UMC POWDER SOLVENT LUBRICANT AND RUST PREVENTATIVE & WINCHESTER OIL .HAVE A SAVAGE ARMS AS WELL JUST GOTTA DIG IT OUT. THESE ARE VERY COLLECTABLE BOTTLES,ACTUALLY THERE ARE NOT MANY BIM EMBOSSED GUN RELATED BOTTLES THAT AREN'T.

 

 REMINGTON UMC- REM OIL

Remington was founded in 1816 by Eliphalet Remington in Ilion, New York, as E. Remington and Sons. It is the oldest company in the United States which still makes its original product, and is the oldest continuously operating manufacturer in North America. It is the only US company which produces both firearms and ammunition domestically, and is the largest US producer of shotguns and rifles. After a 12 year absence in the handgun market Remington announced April, 2010 the Model 1911 R1, slated to be available through select independent dealers beginning June, 2010. The last handgun produced by Remington Arms, the Model XP-100R, ceased production in 1998. Its products are distributed in over 60 foreign countries, making its base wider than those of its competitors. Remington has also developed or adopted more cartridges than any other gun maker or ammunition manufacturer in the world.

 

WINCHESTER GUN OIL ~ WINCHESTER ARMS

The ancestor of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company was the Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson partnership of Norwich, Connecticut (not to be confused with the famous Smith & Wesson Revolver Company founded later by the same men). Smith & Wesson acquired Lewis Jennings' improved version of inventor Walter Hunt's 1848 "Volition Repeating Rifle" and its caseless "Rocket Ball" ammunition, which had been produced in small numbers by Robbins & Lawrence of Windsor, Vermont. Jennings' rifle was a commercial failure, and Robbins & Lawrence ceased production in 1852.Smith designed a much-improved rifle based on Jennings', and the partners also hired away Robbins & Lawrence shop foreman Benjamin Tyler Henry. In 1855 the Smith & Wesson partnership, in order to manufacture what they called the "Volcanic" lever-action rifle and pistol, sought investors and incorporated as the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company. Its largest stockholder was clothing manufacturer Oliver Winchester.

   The Volcanic rifle had only limited success. The company moved to New Haven (without Smith or Wesson) in 1856, but by the end of that year became insolvent. Oliver Winchester and his partner John M. Davies purchased the bankrupt firm's assets from the remaining stockholders, and reorganized it as the New Haven Arms Company in April 1857.

After Smith's departure Benjamin Henry continued to work with a Smith development project, the self-contained metallic rimfire cartridge, and perfected the much larger, more powerful .44 Henry round. Henry also supervised a new rifle design based loosely on the Volcanic to use the new ammunition, retaining only the general form of the breech mechanism and the tubular magazine. This became the Henry rifle of 1860, which was manufactured by the New Haven Arms Company, and used in considerable numbers by certain Union army units in the American Civil War. The Henry rifle ensured New Haven Arms' success, and together with the Spencer rifle established the lever-action repeater in the firearms market.

The "Winchester" Rifle

In 1866 Benjamin Henry, angered over what he believed was inadequate compensation, attempted to have the Connecticut legislature award ownership of New Haven Arms to him. Oliver Winchester, hastening back from Europe, forestalled the move and reorganized New Haven Arms yet again as the Winchester Repeating Arms Company.Winchester had the basic design of the Henry rifle completely modified and improved to become the first Winchester rifle, the Model 1866, which fired the same .44 caliber rimfire cartridges as the Henry but had an improved magazine (with the addition of a loading gate on the right side of the receiver, invented by Winchester employee Nelson King) and, for the first time, a wooden forearm. The Henry and the 1866 Winchester shared a unique double firing pin which struck the head of the rimfire cartridge in two places when the weapon was fired, increasing the chances that the fulminate in the hollow rim would ignite the 28 or so grains of black powder inside the case.

Another extremely popular model was rolled out in 1873. The Model 1873 introduced the first Winchester center fire cartridge, the .44-40 WCF (Winchester Center Fire). These rifle families are commonly known as the "Gun That Won the West."

The Model 1873 was followed by the Model 1876 (or "Centennial Model"), a larger version of the '73, which utilized the same toggle-link action and brass cartridge elevator dating from the Henry. It was chambered for longer, more powerful cartridges such as .45-60 WCF, .45-75 WCF, and .50-95 WCF. The action was not long enough to allow Winchester to achieve their goal of producing a repeating rifle capable of handling the .45-70 Government cartridge; this would not happen until they began manufacture of the Browning-designed Model 1886.

Oliver Winchester died in December 1880; his son and successor, William Wirt Winchester, died of tuberculosis four months later.

From 1883, John Browning worked in partnership with the Winchester Repeating Arms Company and designed a series of rifles and shotguns, most notably the Winchester Model 1885 Single Shot, Winchester Model 1887 lever-action shotgun, Model 1897 pump-action shotgun; and the lever-action Model 1886, Model 1892, Model 1894 and Model 1895 rifles.
BROWN'S SARSAPARILLA ~ FOR THE KIDNEYS LIVER AND BLOOD
NOT NEAR AS COMMON AS THE HOODS BOTTLES BUT WITH SAME DESIGN, BROWNS SARSAPARILLA - FOR THE KIDNEYS,LIVER AND BLOOD.
 
 
 
M.D., Ara Warren & Co, Proprietors Brown's Sarsaparilla, Bangor, ME
 

ARA WARREN. Ara Warren has been president of the Maine State Pharmacutical Association for two years, during which time he has handled the affairs of the body with rare ability, much of the success of the meetings being due to his energy.

He was born November 8, 1853, and commenced his career as a pharmacist twenty years later; he has been very successful in his chosen calling, and he is looked upon as one of Bangor's most prominent druggists. He is also identified with the patent medicine business, being one of the proprietors of Brown's sarsaparilla.

 
HARRY D. HABER'S MAGIC HAIR COLORING
 
HARRY D. HABER'S~MAGIC HAIR COLORING
 
I HAD DUG ONE OF THESE IN GLOVERSVILLE NY AND AFTER RESEARCHING FOUND AN AD FOR IT FROM GLOVERSVILLE, THE MAIN OFFICE I LATER FOUND OUT FROM THE WRITE UP BELOW (HAIR RAISING STORIES) WAS IN NYC. GREAT BOTTLES AND PRETTY SCARCE.
 
 
 
 
 
Henry D. Haber (AKA Harry) was first listed in 1879 as a "Barber" at 84 E. Broadway (also his home). He was apparently successful at this first endeavor, for he had added a second location at 4 Monroe by 1881. From 1882 on, only the Broadway location was mentioned.

His business must have fell upon hard times, because he was listed as a "Agent" in 1885, and then as a "Presser" from 86 through 88. He came back into the Hair business in 1889. He was a "Hairdresser" at 96 E. Broadway that year and in 1890. In 1891, he once again started a business outside his home. He had a "Hair Goods" location at 329 Grand, which he continued to operate until 1896. The last year Harry was listed was in 1896, an that year he had two businesses: "Furs" at 525 Broadway, and the 329 Grand store. Harry D. Haber died in 1896.

Anne F. Haber was listed as Harry's Widow in 1897 with a home at 211 E. Broadway. It is likely that the numbers 84, 96, and 211 E. Broadway were the same house, and only the numbering changed. Anne kept her husband's business alive in her home, being a "Hairdresser" from 1898 to 1900. After a brief break in 1901, when she was a "Dressmaker," she returned to the Hair business in 1902, and was listed as "Coloring." At this time she began to list the business under her deceased husband's name. It was probably she who invented the Magic Hair Coloring around this time. She kept the business alive for many years. It was known as the "Haber MFG Co.," from 1915 until 1925. The brand name "Harry D. Haber's Magic Hair Coloring" was registered as a trademark in 1916 (#114,636). At that time, they claimed to have been using the name since 1881. Mrs Haber had a picture of her deceased husband on the label of the product. The business was still listed in 1933, under the control of Fannie R.C. Haber.
DR. LANGLEY'S ROOT & HERB BITTERS, BOSTON













Dr . Langley's Root & Herb Bitters

6 inchs tall

(below from Peachridge Glass)

 1824: Charles C. Langley (John?s son) was born. Charles takes over the business in 1859.

1849: Lis
ting: John O. Langley, pedler - Cambridge City Directory

1850: John O. Langley, farmer, wife Harriett R.  - United States Federal Census

1852: John O. Langley, medicine dealer - Cambridge City Directory

1857: John O. Langley, patent medicines, 11 Marshall ? Boston City Directory


1860 ?  1862: John O. Langley, patent medicines, 134 Cambridge - Cambridge City Directory


1863: Dr. Langley?s Root and
Herb Bitters sold by George C. Goodwin & Co. (SEE AD AT RIGHT)

1866 ? 1870: John O. Langley, drugs, 134 Cambridge ? Cambridge City Directory

1867: J. H. Langley & Co., Bitters: Office, No. 30 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass., Feb. 1, 1857. Gentlemen,: Your Attention is Called to Our New Trade Mark and Title, which Will Hereafter Appear Upon Every Bottle of Bitters Sold, ? Your Orders, If Forwarded at Once, Will be Promptly Filled, with a Supply of New Show Cards.

 


SMITHS GREEN MOUNTAIN RENOVATOR ~  BRIGHT GREEN BALL MASON JAR
 
SMITHS GREEN MOUNTAIN RENOVATOR, A FAVORITE PANEL MEDICINE FROM VERMONT AND ON RIGHT A VERY NICE GREEN BALL 3 L JAR
 
 
 
 
THE PRICE CUTTING PROBLEM.

St. Albans, Vt., June ix. 1902. Editor of Printers' Ink;

Your issue of April 23rd contains a very interesting article from the pen of Pert M. Moses of the Omega Chemical Company. His letter to you says: "What I have written will perhaps stimulate some discussion and lead to an eventual solution of the price cutting problem. We don't sell to retailers. We sell only to jobbers."

The methods employed in marketing Smith's Green Mountain Renovator are directly opposite to those outlined by Mr. Moses, and as our scheme was inaugurated purely and simply to stop the cutting of prices, it occurs to me that some of your readers may find a short dissertation upon it of interest. If you agree with me. I should appreciate your giving it space in your medium. Yours truly, St. Albans Remedy Co., Farrand S. Stranahan. Mgr.

Vinol and Smith's Green Mountain Renovator are the only dollar remedies extensively advertised upon the special agency plan. The company which I represent began business by introducing the Renovator on the open market. The inevitable cutting of prices and substitution followed, with the result that after an experience of two years, our preparation was taken off from the open market and is now sold only to one druggist in each city and town. This special agent is under guarantee, in writing, to maintain the price of $1.00 per bottle for the Renovator; is privileged to sell other druggists in his city at the same price as formerly asked by the jobber, providing that a druggist so buying signs a similar contraot to that of our agent, i. e., guaranteeing to maintain the price of $ 1.00 per bottle for the Renovator; is privihged to sell other druggists in his city at the same price as formerly asked by the jobber, providing that a druggist so buying signs a similar contract to that of our agent, i e., guaranteeing to maintain the price. Every package of goods which leaves this factory is so marked that it is absolutely impossible for an agent or other drug

fist to alter it so that we can not trace from whom it was obtained. By contract a heavy fine is levied on an agent violating any part of the
agreement. This, in outline, is the method under which Smith's Green Mountain Renovator is sold to the trade.

It is my opinion that Vinol and ourselves are pioneers in a method which will be generally followed within ten >ears, providing some solution of the price cutting problem is not evolved. The whole matter- rests, it seems to me, with the manufacturers. If they can put up their goods and mark them in such a way as will enable them, under all circumstances, to trace them, and then if they obtain from the jobber a written agreement not to supply the goods, either directly or indirectly, to any party who will not maintain the full purchase price, I think the problem would be solved.

There are some articles which are undoubtedly more difficult than others to number or mark with some special sign. I can only speak for the Renovator, but this I again assert: no one, unless thty

absolutely destroy our package, can obliterate our tracer.

To stop the cutting of prices I suggest these four methods:

1st. The manufacturer must mark each package of his goods so that it can be traced.

2nd- The jobber must contract in writing not to supply any person who is not a legitimate dealer and who will not maintain the purchase price of the article.

3rd. The retailer when purchasing from the jobber must guarantee in writing to maintain the price and not supply the cutter.

4th. For any violation on the part of the wholesaler or retailer of their agreements, the manufacturers having adopted this method shall black list such wholesaler or retailer and refuse thereafter to supply them with their products, and not allow other wholesalers or retailers to supply them.

This scheme, though roughly sketched, I believe is the key to the situation.

IT WAS DESERVED.
The Edcell Company.
13th and Hamilton streets.
Philadelphia, June 18, 1902. 
BALL MASON JAR ~ IRON MILK DOSE GLASS

DUG THIS THIS FALL AT ABOUT THE 10 FOOT LEVEL IN AN OLD CITY DUMP, GREAT COLOR WITH DEEP OLIVE AND AMBER DRIFTING THROUGH IT. I WAS GOING TO GET RID OF IT...NOPE, KEEPER/ ON RIGHT A DOSE GLASS EMBOSSED IRON MILK "IT MAKES BLOOD" WITH MEASURES ON BACK

 

BALL MASON JAR

 

The roots of the Ball Glass Manufacturing Company go back to 1880, when Frank and Edmund Ball of Buffalo, New York, purchased the Wooden Jacket Can Company. Originally the brothers manufactured metal cans wrapped in wood, but when John L. Mason's 1858 patent for a fruit-canning jar expired, the brothers prepared to move into glass. By 1884 the first Ball jars as we think of them today were produced, and in 1888 furnaces were fired at a new plant in Muncie, Indiana.

Between 1888 and 1961, the company made more than 41 million canning jars, which is just one reason why the words “Ball” and “Mason” are virtually synonymous today.

Ball enjoyed a meteoric rise. Four years after releasing its first glass products (they also made chimneys for oil lamps and other items), Ball had more than 1,000 employees. Innovation and acquisition became two necessary tools to its success. In 1897, Ball invented the first semi-automatic glass-making machine, which standardized sizes and made production cheaper and faster. In 1905, Ball invented the automatic feeder, which streamlined production even more. Additionally, Ball bought out numerous competitors over the years.

For a long time, the ubiquity of Ball jars prevented them from being particularly desirable in the eyes of collectors. However, in recent years Ball jars have gained popularity, due in large part to the lack of intact jars. Some collectors try to accumulate as many jars as they can, from pints to quarts to half-gallons, in colors that range from standard clear, aquamarine, and green to less-common amber.

Others try to acquire jars with various types of logos on their fronts. For example, when the first machine-made Ball jars were produced in 1896, the distinctive script on the front boasted "Ball IMPROVED MASON," with an extra loop after the last "l" in Ball that almost looks like a fifth letter. From 1900 to 1914, the script was shortened to "Ball MASON," while from 1910 to 1914, some Ball jars bore the words "BALL PERFECT MASON" in big, block letters.

In 1969 the company changed its name to Ball Corporation as it diversified its product line beyond just glass into everything from aerosol containers to space systems; by 1996 it had sold its storied glass division. As for the Ball brothers, their legacy today extends well beyond fruit preservation. The family has been quite philanthropic, and Ball State University in Muncie is named after them.

BOSWELL & WARNER'S COLORIFIC ~ N.Y.
Boswell & Warner's Colorific
It was marketed by Funston & Scofield in New York in 1864. They apparently moved to 9 Dey Street around 1865. They were still listing their Depot at that address between 1872 and 75. I found the Colorific listed for sale in 1896, and, according to Fike, it was still being advertised in 1923. (Hair Raising Stories)
 
 
 
Published: November 22, 1862  Never fails to change GRAY or WHITE HAIR to a beautiful BROWN or BLACK, by merely moistening the HAIR of the HEAD or WHISKERS with the Colorific, and without using any other wash or preparation. It is the best, easiest applied, and cheapest in the market. For after the hair is colored, one bottle will keep it so for nine months or a year. General Depot, FUNSTON & SCOFIELD, No. 62 John-st. For sale at the fashionable hair-dressing saloons and by druggists generally.
BOSWELL & WARNER, Brooklyn, E.D., 
HEALY & BIGELOW'S KICKAPOO INDIAN OIL &  S.S. WHITE MERCURY
Healy & Bigelow's  Kicakapoo Indian Oil &
MY 3 1/2 INCH 1 POUND S.S. WHITE DENTAL RE-DISTILLED MERCURY STONEWARE,A FAVORITE OF MINE

 MOST MERCURY USES HAVE LONG SINCE BEEN BANNED,LOOK AT MY INFORMATION PAGE AND  THERE IS A LIST OF SOME OF THE USES

 
 
The Kickapoo oil company was an Indian Medicine Company.  They frequently had impressive Indian Medicine shows to promote their medicines.  It is unknown the actual beginnings of this company.  Some say that it was started by  John H. Healy and Charles F. Bigelow of Philadelphia although some reports have it starting in Worchester, Mass and then moving to Connnecticut. John Healy was involved in patented medicines as early as the 1860’s…but Bigelow doesn’t show up on any records until the 1880’s.  The patents for Sagwa and the Indian Oil were received in July of 1882.  The address on the patents was in new Haven , Connecticut.  The first advertising material was copyrighted in 1885.

Together Healy and Bigelow built a thriving business.  They added the concept of putting on medicine shows.  They employed Indians (supposedly the Kickapoo’s) to go on tour to demonstrate Indian life and to promote the ‘indian’ medicines. 
   
Sometime around 1894 Healy put the business in the management hands of Bigelow and james Averil who moved a portion of the business from Conneticut to new York City.  In 1901 the business moved back to Connecticut to a town called Clintonville, very close to New Haven ….it is believed that the company was purchased by someone else and at this time became the Kickapoo Indian Medicine Co. Inc.
The food and drug act of 1906 changed the face of this company, just as it did so many other.  In 1907 new packaging started for the medicines….most notably dropping the word Indian from the advertising and title.  Laboratories were started in Philadelphia and St. Louis.   The company was bought by   the Hood Co….proprietors of “Hood’s Sarsaparilla”.   References to Kickapoo Oil is still seen up through the late 1930’s.
 
 
 Samuel Stockton White (1822-1879) was a Philadelphia dentist who in the mid 1840s began manufacturing porcelain teeth using feldspar. White gradually abandoned his practice for the manufacture of teeth, dental instruments and supplies. His porcelain teeth won the highest award at the Crystal Palace Exposition in London in 1851 and again at the Philadelphia Centennial of 1876. By the mid nineteenth century the S.S. White Company had become the largest manufacturer of dental instruments in the world. Branch offices for the sale of the firm's products were opened in New York (1846), Boston (1850), Brooklyn (1852), Chicago (1858), Atlanta (1891), Rochester (1897), New Orleans, Cincinnati, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Nashville, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Peoria, and Omaha. Branches were established abroad in Berlin (1897), St. Petersburg (1899), Toronto, London, Paris, Japan, and Australia. In 1881 the firm was incorporated, changing its name from the S.S. White Co. to the S.S. White Dental Manufacturing Co. The extensive plant of Johnston Bros., on Staten Island, New York, was acquired; it produced a large portion of the products marketed by the firm. The manufacture of teeth was discontinued in 1937. This company was the first to produce the all-metal dental chair, a flexible shaft engine, certain filling products, and precision steel instruments. It published the pioneering periodical, THE DENTAL COSMOS, from 1859 to 1936 (© SMITHSONIAN)
 
 
CROSBY'S 5 - MINUTE CURE
 

CROSBY'S 5 MINUTE CURE, THIRD QUARTER OF 1800S AND FROM NEW YORK CITY. THIS ONE STANDS 1.5 INCHES TALL, NOT COMMON.

Patent,October 14th 1879- Crosby & Co., New York, N. Y. "Crosby's Headache Cure" ?

Same "Crosby's 5 Minute Cure" (for a medicine)

 
 
F. CROSBY COMPANY, 56 WEST 25TH STREET NY
 
CASWELL  HAZARD & CO. CHEMISTS ~ NEW YORK & NEWPORT

  Hazard & Caswell


They come in 3 eras (Caswell Mack, Caswell Hazard, and Hazard Hazard). They all come in cobalt and clear, the later two in amber & not many seem to have strong embossing.

Roland P. Hazard, physician, and John C. Caswell, a wholesale and retail druggist, were located at 12 Washington Square and 132 Thames Street in Newport, Rhode Island in 1856.
    

Their sons, Roland R. Hazard and Phillip Caswell, both residents of New York City, took over the company from their fathers in 1857 becoming Hazard & Caswell. They dealt in medicines, perfumes, brushes, soaps, artists materials, and other items. They became proprietors of Formodenta tooth paste, a liquid dentrifice called Amber Wash, Dentine, a safe
and elegant tooth powder, Feke's Vegetable Dyspepsia Bitters, and several inks and ink and grease removers.

By 1863, John R. Caswell of Newport and Henry F. Mack and Phillip Caswell, Jr. both from New York City, joined together and took over the company changing the name to Caswell Mack & Co. The company was located in both Newport and New York City.

In the early 1880's, the company's name changed to Caswell-Hazard & Co., Family & Dispensing Chemists and still remained in the Newport location as well as the Fifth Avenue Hotel on Broadway at the corner of 24th Street, and at Sixth Avenue at the corner of 39th Street both in New York City.

Later, from 1887 to 1893 the company became Hazard, Hazard & Co. and was run only by John C. Hazard and Roland N. Hazard.

In the late 1890's, John R. Caswell, William M. Massey, and Lyman B. Blackman joined together and were operating out of Newport on Thames Street and another location on Bellevue Avenue, and also in New York under the name Caswell Massey & Co. By 1906 they were succeeded by Hall, Lyons, & Co., New England Apothecaries, 212 Thames Street in Newport and continued until 1915.

The company was still in business, reverting back to the Caswell-Massey name sometime in the past, as evident in their ad in the Providence Evening Bulletin dated August 8, 1980. The ad stated that their motto was, "The Fragrant World of Caswell & Massey."   littlerhodybottleclub.org



Caswell-Massey is a personal care product company and apothecary shop founded in 1752 in Newport, Rhode Island, by a Scottish-born doctor named William Hunter. It is one of the oldest continuously operating companies in the United States and the world; ranked by the Wikipedia List of oldest companies as one of the oldest ongoing retail companies in the United States, and third oldest ongoing perfumer in the world. The main product categories it sells are soaps, fragrances, lotions, shaving products and tools, other apothecary-style personal care accessories, and bath- and fragrance-related products for the home.

Originally called Dr. Hunter’s Dispensary, it began as an apothecary shop selling medical supplies. Dr. Hunter was active in the community, and gave the first lectures on anatomy and surgery in the Colonies in 1755. During that time, he also invented orange soda to help his customers take the medicines sold in his apothecary shop.

Newport, Rhode Island, at the time, attracted the Colonies’ social elite who sought European-style luxuries. While serving his customers’ medical needs, Dr. Hunter also began to serve their cosmetic, personal care and hygiene needs as well. He imported fragrances from Europe and blended some 20 different colognes himself. The fragrances were numbered One through Twenty of which Number Six (created in 1789) was favored by George Washington and John Adams. Number Six, with its orange and bergamot scent, continues to be sold by the company to this day.

For approximately the first three quarters of a century the apothecary shop changed owners in the tradition of each retiring pharmacist handing over the keys to his apprentice. Dr. William Hunter was followed by Charles Feke who in turn was followed by Rowland Hazard in 1822. Hazard took Philip Caswell into partnership and the name became Hazard & Caswell. In 1833 following Rowland Hazard’s death the company became Caswell & Hazard. In the same year the first Caswell-Massey branch opened in New York City.

A fragrance called Jockey Club was introduced in 1840. This fragrance later is said to have been a favorite of President John F. Kennedy. It is also currently sold today. In 1860 Castile Soap is introduced, and was used by Abraham Lincoln after his inauguration in 1861. The company during that time also continued to make other apothecary products. Among General Custer’s personal effects at “the last stand” Battle of Little Bighorn of 1876 was a Caswell-Massey toothbrush, still on display at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.

The company took its present name Caswell-Massey when then-owner John Rose Caswell formed a partnership with New York businessman William Massey in 1876. In that year the company operated only two stores, one in Newport and one in New York City. Over the next 30 years Caswell-Massey grew to 10 stores in New York City, but closed its Newport store in 1906.

In 1916, a 13-year old Ralph Taylor was hired to sweep the shop and clean bottles in the basement. Twenty years later, in 1936, Ralph and his younger brother Milton bought the company. Ralph and Milton would own Caswell-Massey for 53 years.

During the early-to-mid 1900s leaders in business, politics and the arts frequented the Caswell-Massey stores to fill their prescriptions and purchase personal care supplies. Customers included the Astors and Vanderbilts  Edgar Allan Poe, George Gershwin, Judy Garland, Katharine Hepburn and Greta Garbo[3]. In 1926 a store is opened on Lexington and 48th in New York City, in what was then the Barclay Hotel, later InterContinental New York Barclay Hotel. That location is currently the company’s flagship store, and is one of the oldest ongoing retail stores in New York City.

Almond Cold Cream soap was launched in 1940. Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower ordered it for the White House after he became president in 1953. Mamie Eisenhower was also a fan of “White Rose” perfume, writing a thank you letter to the company. During the second half of the century, customers also included Jacqueline Onassis (who bought avocado oil) and the Rolling Stones[3].

Caswell-Massey currently has one retail store in the United States, sells products through its website and mail-order catalog, as well as through department stores and specialty shops. The store is located in New York City, NY. The website is www.caswellmassey.com

BRANDES BRO. GRAND CENTRAL RYE  NEW YORK
BRANDES BROS. New York, NY. 1880-1906    

Brandes Bros. (1880-1885), August Brandes (1890), Brandes Bros. & Co. (1895-1906)

103 E 42 nd St (grocers: 1880) & 872 11 th St (Liquors: 1880), 319 3 rd Ave (1885) & 119-121 E 42 nd (1885-1906) & 135 E 125 th (1895)
    Name- Brandes Brothers - used from 1880-1885, Three brothers were August, Frederick & Dederick 
 
 
 
WESTFORD, CONN.  ALE ~ 1860'S / PONTILED ALE ~ 1850'S

 

A RECENT TRADE IN GREAT SHAPE AND DEEP ROOT BEER/OLIVE IN COLOR. 

ON RIGHT IS A PONTILED ALE IN OLIVE/ROOT BEER COLOR DATING TO 1850+ RANGE

The Westford Glass Works 1857-1873

The late George E. Buck and his son, Edwin A., of Rutland, Mass., formed a tie with a past glass house of 19th Century Connecticut  Until the mid-1970s, they were were the living relatives of E.A. Buck, prominent businessman and manufacturer of Ashford and Westford, Connecticut.  Edwin still survives today, still living in

 Massachusetts. [Other descendents live in New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and Arizona, each of whom recently contacted the Museum of Connecticut Glass.]

E.A Buck was born in Ashford in 1832, and during his youth and early manhood taught school in his native town, according to the Willimantic Journal's 1894 souvenir edition owned by (the late) John J. Supina of Ashford, Connecticut. 

In 1856, E.A. Buck began business with a saw mill, developed a large trade in plow beams and handles, car timbers and other wood goods.  He also operated several waterpower saw mills and employed a large number of men.

But in 1865 he purchases the Westford Glass Co. from a group of 13 shareholders, whose capital stock was worth $18,000.  The glass factory had been erected in 1857 not far from the West Willington glass factory, where supposedly bottle molds were exchanged occasionally.

Buck operated the company with two partners under the firm name of E.A. Buck & Co.  The Journal reported that the business grew to such an extent that the firm established selling houses in New York and Boston.  The company closed the glassworks in 1873 and Buck retired in 1874.

During these retirement years, he served as director of the Stafford National Bank and was one of the original incorporators of the Stafford Savings Bank of which he became president. 

He resigned all of these offices in 1875 when he moved to Willimantic.  There he held large property interests.  In that town, he continued to operate the saw mill on the Mount Hope River with power produced by a wheel of 20 horse capacity and did an extensive business in native lumber, railroad ties and the like.  He also held large business interests in Stafford Springs and Palmer, Mass.  I
n 1885, he was elected as director and the next year as president of the Willimantic Savings Institute, holding the position two years through a critical financial period and placed the institution back on a sound fiscal base.

He soon after began a grain mill in the city, which was located near the center of the city with bin capacities of 12 to 15 thousand bushels.  The works operated by a 40-horse engine.

Buck's public positions began when he attained his majority (21 years of age).  In 1856, he served as state representative, the youngest member of the House.  He held nearly every town office at different times - constable, selectman, assessor, clerk and judge of probate, and served several terms as a state representative.

During the rebellion, he strongly supported the Union cause and, in 1862, was appointed by the town of Ashford to fill its quota of soldiers.

In 1876, he was elected treasurer of the state and served two years.  During the year of the Journal article, 1894, he was serving as Bank Commissioner of Connecticut. 

George recalled that his father hired a man on the spot when the man shattered a huge glass blood amber lightning rod ball with a rifle on top of his father's barn.  The ball had been blown at the Westford factory.

George also remembers when his grandfather employed about 50 men.  Each was paid $18 a day.  Buck explained that his grandfather's business flourished because of the factory location on the Continental Road that led to Boston through Boston Hollow and to New York southward.

George Buck moved his family from Ashford to Rutland, Mass., in the 1960s.  Left behind are the remnants of the Westford factory in tangled underbrush - some of the furnace pots, blowpipes used as fence posts, and parts of the buildings that once stood on that location plus a trench filled with broken glass bottles and other shards.  George's son, Edwin Buck, sold native honey for a few years.

The Buck family continued to live several years in the modest home tucked away along a forgotten road in Massachusetts far from where the glass factory produced great quantities of blown and molded glass for commercial use.

The Westford property presently is owned by Ralph Fletcher, a former First Selectman of Ashford. 

Establishing the Westford Glass Works

In 1857, thirteen stockholders put up $18,000 in capital and formed the company.  Among the largest holders were Thomas C. Cary, John S. Dean, C.L. Dean, Dan Chaffee, Edwin A. Buck and James Richmond.  The factory produced a variety of bottles, jars, containers, demijohns and flasks, then in demand, very much like those made at the West Willington glassworks.  They also produced quart ink bottles, wine bottles in varying sizes, demijohns from 1/4-gallon to 5-gallon, flasks in 1/2-pint to pint and quart sizes, handled jugs, schnapps pint and quart bottles, 1/2-pint to pint and quart porters.  Tableware pieces included candlesticks.  As noted earlier, there is evidence to show they shared moulds with Willington.  The most popular Westford bottles are the marked flasks in 1/2-pint and pint molds, GII-65, GXIII-36 and GXIII-37.  They reportedly made the GXIV-1 Travelers Companion Quart mold also. The colors associated with Westford were olive-amber, deep red-amber, medium amber, pale-green, deep olive-green and yellow-olive green.

Courtesy of  Museum of Connecticut click here to see this article in full

 

  COCA ~ MARIANI  & CO. NEW YORK  PONTILED OLIVE~AMBER WHISKEY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1870'S COCA MARIANI WINE TONIC, ORIGINALY TOUTED CONTAINING COCAINE,AND DID IN SMALL AMOUNTS. UNTIL THE 1906 FOOD AND DRUG ACT, THEN THEY TOUTED HOW IT DID'NT !!

A SUPER NICE,VERY CLEAN,WHITTLED OLIVE AMBER PONTILED WHISKEY CYLINDER DATING TOO THE EARLY PART OF THE 1800'S.

HUILE D'OLIVE, JOHN CORRY ~ PHILA.
MY AMERICAN SEAL BOTTLE FROM JOHN CORRY PHILADELPHIA DATING TO 1840-50S RANGE. THESE WITHOUT THE SEAL ARE OFTEN CONSIDERED WINES AND IN MOST CASES I WOULD SAY RIGHTFULLY SO AS THE PUSHED UP BASE IS USUALLY A GIVE AWAY. THE SAID PURPOSE OF THE PUSH UP IS SO SEDIMENT IN WINE CAN GATHER THERE, IT THEREFORE SEEMS REASONABLE THAT IT IS BEING USED FOR THAT SAME PURPOSE HERE.

A CRUDE BOTTLE WITH APPLIED LIP AND DONE IN A SPIN MOLD TYPE MANUFACTURE AND THEREFORE SHOWING NO SEAMS.
 
 The dies for many bottle seals with foreign lettering were made in the United States. The seals in picture above were all made at the Dyottville Glass Works in Philadelphia, Pa. around 1880
E. PERNOD COUVET  ~ ABSINTHE

Very early Swiss-made Absinthe Edouard Pernod, distilled in Couvet before the company opened its second and much larger French facility in Pontarlier in 1897.

Absinthe as we know it today began life in the late 18th century, in the Val de Travers region of Switzerland. According to the oft-repeated legend it was a Dr. Pierre Ordinaire who first produced a commercial form of absinthe, a distilled patent medicine of Artemisia absinthium (Grand Wormwood) and other herbs touted as a tonic and cure-all thought particularly effective against intestinal parasites (which, it would seem, is not entirely untrue). It was Dr. Ordinaire?s product which is purported to have been bought by a Major Dubied from the Henriod Sisters of Couvet in Switzerland sometime before 1797, with an eye to selling absinthe as a recreational aperitif rather than just a medicinal tonic. According to one variant on the tale, upon his death Ordinaire bequeathed the absinthe formula to his housekeeper who then sold it to the Henriod sisters. This being said, it is possible that it was the Henriod sisters who were producing absinthe in the beginning, and that Ordinaire did nothing more than market it more widely, however the ultimate truth of the matter eludes us even today. What is accepted is that it was at this time absinthe attracted the nickname La Fée Verte The Green Fairy, the first hint that the drink had taken on a mythic appeal in addition to it?s physical one, possibly associated with it?s original ?medicinal? reputation. Dubied began producing absinthe with his son Marcellin and son-in-law Henri-Louis Pernod, who subsequently set up the Pernod Fils absinthe distilling company in Pontarlier, France around 1805. Soon after this, possibly as a result of friction in the family, or possibly as an exercise in diversification Dubied returned to Switzerland and his own business, along with son Marcellin, now named Dubied Père et Fils, in Couvet.

History now shows that it was Pernod who succeeded in business, possibly due in part to lower tariffs and customs duties in France, however the success of absinthe in France was largely thanks to soldiers returning from Algeria and other parts of North Africa during the 1840s. Absinthe was given to the French troops as a fever preventative, but it appears that the soldiers developed a taste for the drink, and famously brought their love of the new-found tipple home to their countrymen, who quickly adopted the custom giving Pernod Fils had an immediate and eager customer base. Henris-Louis? youngest son Louis took over and expanded the business, buying a large tract of land in Pontarlier by the Doubs river. In turn, Louis?s sons Fritz and Louis-Alfred inherited the business from their father, and with some financial assistance, continued to expand. Dubied Père et Fils transferred to a cousin, Fritz Duval, meanwhile Pernod?s eldest son Edouard has begun producion of absinthe under his own name in 1827, his son Edouard II starting his own company in or around 1897.

 

Edouard Pernod
Henri-Louis Pernod married Major Dubied? daughter Emilie and as a result set up a partnership with Major Dubied and his son Marcellin in Couvet, Switzerland.It was a small distillery measuring eight-by-four meters producing absinthe from the recipe which Major Dubied had bought from the Henriod sisters in 1797.

The increased sale of absinthe and high import taxes led Henri-Louis Pernod set up a larger distillery in Pontarlier,France in 1805.

Henri-Louis Pernod had two sons by two marriages.The younger son Louis (by second wife,Emilie Dubied) ran the Pernod Fils distillery in Pontarlier, France and the eldest son,Edouard,remained in Couvet and in 1827 transferred the company to his own name.Eventually,Edouard had a son also called Edouard who started his own company in 1897.By the time of the 1915 ban, Edouard had merged with Pernod Fils and become the 3rd largest absinthe distiller in France, but later was forced to merge with Jules Pernod, whom we know nowadays as Pernod.

CLYDE GLASS WORKS ~ ELY, SONS & HOYT 1880

An early flask base embossed E. SONS & H. which was Ely  sons and Hoyt. Half pint size and crude,dates to 1880


 

The Clyde Glass Works has quite a history. About the year 1820 William S. DcZeng purchased the land where the glass works is now located and with James R. Rees founded the present glass works in 1827.

It was then simply a window glass factory and the corner stone was laid March 27, 1828. under the superintendence of Major Frederick A. DeZeng. From 1828 to 1864 the window glass factory alone was run.

In 1864 the bottle factory was started, the firm being Southwick & Woods, then Southwick & Reed. Afterwards both factories were under the management of Southwick. Reed & Co. On July 24. 1873. the establishment was burned, but was at once rebuilt. In 1878 the buildings underwent repairs and the old corner stone was replaced by a new one August 10th.

In 1880 Mr. Reed retired and the firm became Ely Sons & Hoyt. After the death of Mr. Hoyt the name was changed to the Clyde Glass Works. Closed in mid 1914.

 

SALZMAN & SIEGELMAN ~ BROOKLYN, N.Y.
Morris Salzman and Purity Above All

His name was Morris Salzman and he made a fortune in the liquor trade in Brooklyn, New York, with the slogan:  Purity Above All.

Salzman did not begin life rich.  Born in Austria in 1870,  he emigrated to the United States about 1886 at the age of 16.  He came alone with little money and no ability to speak English,  settling into the Jewish section of New York’s Lower East Side.   He proved to be a quick learner and early on, we can presume, worked in the city’s liquor trade.   By 1892 he was affluent enough to woo and win as his bride,  Rose,  an immigrant herself from Austria who was about five years younger.  Their first child,  Beatrice, was born a year later.  She was followed by Samuel in 1896 and Mamie in 1898.
        
At the turn of the 20th Century,  Salzman teamed with another New Yorker to form their own wholesale and retail liquor operation in Brooklyn, located at 417 6th Avenue. Salzman & Siegelman became known for issuing their whiskey and wines in ceramic jugs.  After several years in business,  for reasons unknown,  Siegelman left the partnership and set up his own business.  Shortly thereafter Salzman himself created a new enterprise called M. Salzman & Co.  It was located in Brooklyn at 248 Third Avenue until Prohibition. The interior is shown here.

As Morris was striking out on his own, the United States was embarked on a major effort to clean up the food and drug industries.  Powerful newspaper and magazine exposes had brought to the fore the amount of adulteration that was occurring daily in products being ingested by the public.   What became known as the Pure Food and Drug Act was passed in 1906 after much discussion and publicity.  Some whiskey men were quick to seize on the purity angle in their merchandising,  but none with more emphasis and tenacity than Morris Salzman.

PURITY ABOVE ALL  was a slogan to be found on everything that flowed from the Salzman establishment.   He frequently packaged his whiskey in ceramic jugs, ranging in size from quarts to five gallons.  On each one was his name and a banner proclaiming his motto.   On his quart and smaller  glass whiskeys,  the mantra was inscribed in the embossing.   It appeared on his labeled whiskeys, giveaway items and in every advertisement.  If you saw the name Salzman you also saw PURITY ABOVE ALL.

Salzman featured a number of brands without signaling a flagship.  They included: "Old Webster Pure Rye,  "Sycamore Pure Rye," "Adirondack Pure Rye, "Bellwood Bourbon," "Empire Pure Rye," "Old Doctrine Club,"  "Pure Old Rye,  and always "Purity Above All." Clearly in competition with dozens of myriad New York whiskey merchants, including his former partner, Morris issued several giveaway shot glasses,  one suggesting drinking his whiskey in the morning, the other at bedtime.

With his success in Brooklyn,  Salzman expanded his operation to Buffalo, New York, with a store at 246 Main Street.   He also incorporated this company with a registered capitalization of $300,000.   Buy 1910,  according to his great grandson,  Morris had amassed a small fortune.   The riches allowed him to take regular trips back to Austria in order to visit a brother and other relatives.   It was on one of those trips in 1906 where the family photograph above was taken.  It shows, from left, Samuel, age 10;  Morris, 46; Mamie, 8;  Rose, 41;  and Beatrice,13.

Morris also used his money for public purposes. Salzman’s great grandson says of him during this period:  I have seen a newspaper article saying he stood in the back of a crowded Brooklyn, NY theater where people were buying War Bonds (WW1). People were buying small lots....10's and hundreds of $. He stood and purchased $1,000,000 in US Government War bonds...the crowd gasped in astonishment. That sum was unheard of in that day.

Although Prohibition shut down his whiskey enterprise,  Morris had sufficient wealth to weather the storm.  The 1920 Census finds him living with Rose and the two younger children with a gardener, chauffeur and three maid servants.   He gave no occupation but clearly was contemplating his next move.   Shortly thereafter he joined the Greenpoint National Bank where he may have had a relative in management.  After learning something of banking Morris struck out on his own in 1821, starting a company called Colonial Discount.  It was a move into a new industry providing automobile loans.

The Colonial Discount Co. frequently was in court, attempting to collect on loans gone bad. In once instance an illegal still in a Brooklyn garage exploded. That same night a police officer spotted a Chevrolet  truck parked immediately in front of the building. The truck was found to contain sixty-five full 5-gallon cans of alcohol and ten 50-gallon empty drums.  Under Federal law, Prohibition officials sought to seize the vehicle.  Salzman’s firm, however, had the mortgage on the truck and also claimed it. A judge gave the truck to the Feds.

After nine years as president of Colonial Discount, Morris died at the age of 61, much mourned by his family.  Unlike other whiskey men who had tooted a horn about purity, he seems never to have been cited by state or national authorities for adulterating his whiskey or wines.  When Morris Salzman said it, it seems, he really meant PURITY ABOVE ALL. (courtesy "those Pre-Pro Whiskey Men blog")

 

                

Morris Salzman ran a bar in Brooklyn in partnership with with Siegelman from around 1895 and they later co-owned the Empire Distillery. They were located at 417 6th Ave from at least 1902 to 1904. Siegelman left the partnership and set up his own business in 1904. By 1906, Morris Salzman & Co. are shown at 248 3rd Ave and stayed there until at least 1915.

 

LOOS, KAUFMAN & COMPANY ~  SYRACUSE,N.Y.

1870S 1/2 PINT & PINT FLASKS FROM LOOS, KAUFMAN & COMPANY LOCATED AT WHAT USED TO BE VANDERBILT SQUARE IN SYRACUSE NEW YORK. 

 

 

 

Loos, Kaufman & Co. ~ 14 Vanderbilt Square, Syracuse NY (Horace & Hamilton White original building) 1882

The office was located in a building on ground now occupied by the White Memorial Building on Vanderbilt Square (Now Washington Street & Salina Streets)

 

 

THE SYRACUSE DAILY COURIER   MONDAY AUGUST 20,1877
LOOS, KAUFMAN & Co., IMPORTERS  14 VANDERBILT SQUARE, SYRACUSE N.Y.
Always stocking:
Rhine Wine, Clarots, Burgundys, Ports, Sherry, Madeiras, Muscatole, Ohio Wines, Brandy, Whiskey, including the very finest in market, Gins, Rum, Bottled Ales of all descriptions, Selter's Apollinaris Water, and Hunydi Jano's Mineral Water. SPECIAI. ATTENTION GIVEN TO FAMILY TRADE.

CHASE & SANBORN COFFEE IMPORTERS ~  BOSTON

 
 
 
 
ONE OF MY FAVORITE BOTTLES, 1870S RANGE
 
 
One of the early American coffee roasting companies was started in Boston by Caleb Chase and James Sanborn.


Caleb Chase moved to Boston and in 1864, he went on to business as a coffee roaster. While James Sanborn moved to Boston three years later and set himself as a coffee seller. They partnered to form Chase and Sanborn in 1874.

In 1878, Caleb and James Sanborn introduced canned coffee. It claims to be the first coffee company to pack and ship roasted coffee in sealed tins. They advertised heavily the Chase and Sanborn product heavily and consumers responded enthusiastically to is quality and convenience.

Chase and Sanborn claimed to import the best coffees in the world, which were then ground and packaged in Boston.

They hired local agents throughout the nation and Canada to tout the benefits of Chase and Sanborn’s sealed cans, a first in the industry.

By 1893 Chase and Sanborn had become established enough to be selected to supply coffee to all the salons of that year’s Chicago World’s Fair.

Chase and Sanborn coffees did well into the first half of the 20th century helped by heavy advertising. The company was the first ground coffee in America to be distributed coast to coast.

 

WARNER'S SAFE KIDNEY & LIVER CURE ~ CHAMBERLAINS PAIN BALM

 

WARNER'S SAFE KIDNEY & LIVER CURE,DON'T DIG AS MANY IN THIS AREA AS YOU USED TOO. FOUND IN MANY VARIANTS THIS 2 OF THEM WITH THE BLOB TOP BEING NEWER, THE GREENS AND OPPOSITE SWINGING DOOR ETC. STILL A COOL BOTTLE BUT NOT VERY HARD TO GET IN THIS VARIANT.

ON RIGHT CHAMBERLAINS PAIN BALM, NICE CLEAN BIM EXAMPLE. THIS COMPANY WAS FAMOUS FOR A FEW MEDICINES,SEE BELOW

WARNER'S SAFE KIDNEY & LIVER CURE

Disease is an effect, not a cause. Its origin Ib within; its manifestations without. Hence, to cure the disease the cause must be removed, and in no other way can a cure ever be effected Warner's SAFE Cure is established on just this principle. It realizes that  95 PER CENT. of all diseases arise from deranged Kidneys and Liver, and it strikes at once at the root of the difficulty. The elements of which it Is composed act directly upon these great organs, both as a food and restorer, and, by placing them in a healthy condition, drive disease and pain from the system. For the innumerable troubles caused by unhealthy Kidneys, Liver and Urinary Organs; for the distressing Disorders of Women; for all Nervous Affections, and physical derangements generally, this great remedy has no equal. Its st record Is a guarantee of continued per

WARNER'S SAFE CURE CO.

Warner's Safe Cure Co., Lake Ave. & White St.—Prop. Meds  Price Per Doz.

Warner's Safe Cure For the Kidneys and Liver .  Warner's SAFE Cure—Large $S.OO

Warner's SAFE Cure—Small 4.00

Warner's SAFE Diabetes Cure.. ..10.00 Warner's SAFE Rheumatic Cure. 10.00

Warners SAFE Asthma Cure 5.C0

Warnor's SAFE Nervine—Large... 7.00 Warner's SAFE Nervine—Small... 8.75 Warner's SAFE Pills 1.40

A Matter Which Concerns You. 

Below will be found a sample of the multitude of letters of encouragement Messrs. H. H. W'arner & Co., of Rochester, N. Y., daily receive. The subjoined unsollcited testimonials are from your friends and neighbors, ladles and gentlemen you know and esteem for their honor and straightforwardness, and who would scorn to be a party to any deception. What has been done for others can be done for you. and It is folly, nay suicidal, to longer suffer when the means of recovery He at your very door:

Saratoga Springs, N.y. Dec. 17, 1887—Seven years have now passed since I was perfectly cured by " Warners Safe Cure" of a most painful and severe form of Chronic Kidney Disease which had been present for fifteen years. I was unable to lieur the Intense pain, and consequently used morphine until my limbs were a mass of scars, made by the instrument used for injecting it. When I think of my former suffering and my almest hopeless condition, I feel like giving thanks and praise to the remedy, " Warner's Safe Cure," that restored me to health and happiness. During the past seven years I have had no return of my former troubles, and I desire to say most emphatically that I regard " Warner's Safe Cure " as a never-falling panacea fer kidney difficulties, acute or chronic. My cure is permanent and I am to-day sound and well.

CHAMBERLAIN MEDICINE CO. 

 In 1872, Lowell Chamberlain started the first Iowa drug company. In 1881, he moved his company, Chamberlain Medicine Co., from eastern Iowa to 206 Court Avenue in Des Moines. Officers of the company were D. S. (Davis) Chamberlain, Lowell Chamberlain and Izanna Chamberlain.
    In 1892, Chamberlain Medicine Co. was incorporated and achieved national distribution.
    By 1900, the business was flourishing in a large new plant located at 702 Sixth Avenue. Over the next twenty years, branch offices were opened in South Africa, Australia and Canada. A copy of 'Chamberlain's Almanac' from 1923 advertised popular products such as Chamberlain's Cough Remedy, Chamberlain's Liniment and Chamberlain's Pain Balm.
    With profits earned from Chamberlain Medicine Co., Davis Chamberlain began construction in 1900 of a home on Grand Avenue at 35th Street. The home, known then as 'West Chester', was designed by William George Rantoul and is the oldest example of Tudor-Jacobethan 17th century English architecture in Des Moines. In 1949, the Chamberlain home was purchased by Iowa Methodist Homes and became Wesley Acres Retirement Home. Restored in 1986, the home today continues as a centerpiece and integral part of Wesley Acres.
    About 1910, Davis Chamberlain bought the business from Lowell. Around this time, Davis also built Chamberlain Hotel at 7th and Locust.

 

Chamberlain Remedies "Staple As Sugar In a Grocery Store" CHAMBERLAIN'S COLIC and DIARRHOEA REMEDY  CHAMBERLAIN'S COUGH REMEDY  CHAMBERLAIN'S STOMACH and LIVER TABLETS
CHAMBERLAIN'S ANTISEPTIC LINIMENT  CHAMBERLAIN'S PAIN BALM  CHAMBERLAIN'S ST. PATRICK PILLS  CHAMBERLAIN'S SALVE   All Good Sellers Every Day In the Year  CHAMBERLAIN MEDICINE CO.Manufacturing Pharmacists DES MOINES, IOWA

 

SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y. HISTORICAL SOCIETY

"1971 first antique show Saratoga Springs NY Historical Society" I had 2 of these at one time but donated one to the National Bottle Museum as they did not have one. The first year of the Saratoga antique show put on by the Historical Society and still held today. This is the year i started collecting, there were 1000 of these made by BPK glass works out of Fla. (1968-1972).
PONTILED NAVAL FLASK ~ LEATHER WRAPPED POCKET FLASK


Crane,Virgin,window or Naval flask of Swedish make

ON RIGHT A GIFT FROM MY FRIEND DANA,  M.V. OLRY & Co.PHILADELPHIA (1868 to 1874)

 

 

Swedish produced pre-turn of century Naval flask, polished pontil with applied foot and rigaree on sides. It was suggested that it was art glass, after a trip to the bottle museum and then to Corning glass museum i was directed to contact a Swedish site and found the information through contact i was searching for there. These started out in 1700s having a "window" in center and by the late 1800s

were mostly produced as seen here due to the unstable center flat window i am told, many were produced early on with full open hole in center and were also called a window,crane,virgin or naval flask. I have not been able to find another like mine except in clear and in drawing form from book. They contained wine in most cases and were a functional/used bottle not for decoration only.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

AYER'S HAIR VIGOR
PEACOCK BLUE AYERS HAIR VIGOR WITH STOPPER, GREAT COLORED BOTTLES.
 
 
Ayer's Hair Vigor This product was originally sold by J.C. Ayer & Co., of Lowell, Mass. Ayer and Edward Haeffely registered a Patent for a "Composition for Coloring and Dressing Human Hair" on January 28th, 1868 (Patent #73,865). The primary ingredients were: tartro-plumbite of soda, glycerine, and water. There were several variations of the recipe. The following is a re-wording of the primary recipe used:
(1) Dissolve 9 pounds of lead acetate in water; (2) add 9 pounds of cream of tartar, dissolved in water (as little water as will take it up); (3) wash this precipitate in water twice; (4) dissolve the precipitate in 30 pounds of solution of caustic soda (specific gravity 1.07); (5) add sufficient water to bring quantity to 13 pounds; (6) add 6 1/2 gallons of glycerine.
Ayer registered "Ayer's Hair Vigor" and the picture of the woman with long flowing hair as trademarks for his hair preparation in 1876. The picture shown was included with the trademark petition as an example of how the trademark was used. The petitioners for the trademark (J. C. Ayer & Co.) indicated that they had been selling the brand name for over eleven years, and that the preparation was also a patented or propriety article of their own invention. The trademark for the Hair Vigor was re-registered in 1914 (#s 95726 & 96,087). The preparation was not represented in an 1867 Ayer's Almanac. In the early years of its sale, Ayer's Hair Vigor was in direct competition with Hall's Hair Renewer. It was the product of Reuben P. Hall of Nashua New Hampshire . They weren't in competition long though, because Ayer bought out Hall in 1870. A couple of months after they were issued the Trade Mark for their own brand, in 1876, J.C. Ayer & Frederick Ayer, calling themselves "R.P. Hall & Co.," registered a Trade Mark for "Hall's Vegetable Sicilian Hair Renewer." They mentioned in that petition, that they had bought the business of Hall in November of 1870.
AYER'S ADVERTISING
FEDERATION OF HISTORICAL BOTTLE COLLECTORS { FOHBC }

 A commemorative jug for 20 year mark of FOHBC, the information below is from the Federation site and the page is in process. Click on left (old) logo to go there.

 

 

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1959 – ABCA Founded

On October 15, 1959, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Tibbits (wife Edith) called the first meeting of what became The Antique Bottle Collectors Club of California at their home in Sacramento, California. Tibbits was elected the first president. It was believed to be the first such club. This attracted the attention of antique bottle clubs across the country and many joined what eventually evolved into the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors (FOHBC).

1960 – First ABCA Convention

First convention held

 

1963 – The Pontil   

 The inaugural issue of The Pontil was published.

The FOHBC publication for members is now "Bottles and Extras"

 

 

 

1968 – ABCA Eight Annual Convention

FirstBoardMembers8

Thirteen clubs met during the annual ABCA convention on 21- 23 June 1968 at the El Rancho Hotel-Motel in West Sacramento, California. The General Chairman was Elmer Lester (see information below). There were 45 affiliated clubs and the organization had grown too big for one club to handle it. Delegates voted to organize the “International Federation of Bottle Clubs,” according to George Rieber, who later became the first Federation chairman. The first meeting was held on November 16 in Oakland, California, with the Golden Gate Historical Bottle Society as host.

1969 – The first six Board Members

March 30, 1969 – 55 delegates from 17 clubs met to conduct the business of the Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors. The photo below is the first slate of officers elected at the meeting. Left to right: Peck Markota, 2nd Vice Chairman, John Eatwell, 1st Vice Chairman, Dick Hansen, Recording Secretary, George Rieber, Honorary Chairman, the late Elmer Lester, Chairman, and Julie Gray, Treasurer.

1976 - The 1st National Antique Bottle & Jar Exposition

The first National Antique Bottle & Jar Exposition was held in 1976 at St. Louis, Missouri. Hal Wagner and Jerry Jones served as Show Chairmen. With 140 displays and 280 sales tables, the floor was filled. Over 4,000 collectors attended the show which makes it still the best attended show in FOHBC history.

INDIAN (ERROR VARIANT) ROOT BEER EXTRACT

 Turn of the century Indian Root Beer Extract (error variant)

ROOT BEER EXTRACTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY  (Courtesy of Glenn Poch)

There are a few, of you who collect root beer extract bottles, who might enjoy this. Hopefully the rest of you will find the information interesting. For those of you who were not aware of this piece of history, root beer predates all of the "cola" drinks and had been around for many years prior to the big surge in the extract business. The availability of the bottled extract started in the 1880's- and went right up to the late 1950's. After that time, it became harder and harder to obtain the bottled extracts. as the colas were not the dominant drink in America. Root Beer is primarily an American drink- and is an interesting part of the "soda" history in America. When thinking about these types of bottles, most people generally think of the Hires extracts., from Philadelphia, which as a whole, are probably the most common of all of the root beer extract bottles. What you may or may not realize, is that there are many different root beer extract bottles, from all over the country, that make a fairly sizable category to collect, just themselves. Many of the root beer extract bottles are embossed with the brand, manufacture, city, state, etc, while others may just have the brand name. Other extract bottles were more generic, with paper labels applied to them. We are only going to address embossed bottles in this article, and only bottles that have a city or state included as part of the embossing. Most of the embossed bottles described date from the 1880 to 1920 time frame. We will not include specific measurements after this point, unless the bottle is not a "typical" extract bottle. Most of the "typical" extract bottles are roughly 4 1/4" to 4 3/4" tall, with 4 sides that are each approximately 1 1/2" wide. Most of the bottles described are pale aqua, pale green, or clear, though some of them are of a darker aqua, and amber. The / between lines indicates a different side of the bottle.

Many people assume that Hires is the original creator of root beer. He was not, but he most likely was one of the first., if not the first, to market the bottled extract for making root beer, and he was without question. the most successful promoter of his product. Since Hires was from Philadelphia, we will begin there. Then, we will move around the country!

These are just representative of the Hires bottles, as there are many different styles. The following bottles all say they are from Philadelphia. Most of the later Hires bottles do not. These also say root beer on them. As Hires came out with other products, they changed their bottles to read just Hires Household Extract., or just Hires Extract, as they could then use the same basic bottle for any one of several different extracts. The first one we are listing, reads as follows, HIRES HOUSEHOLD EXTRACT / FOR BREWING ROOT BEER AT HOME / MANUFACTURED BY THE CHARLES E. HIRES CO. / PHILADELPHIA, PA. U.S.A. What is interesting about that bottle. is that it says "for brewing root beer at home". Our net example of a Hires bottle from Philadelphia, reads as follows, HIRES ROOTBEER / MAKES FIVE GALLONS OF A DELICIOUS DRINK MANUFACTURED BY THE CHARLES E. HIRES CO. / PHILADELPHIA, PA. U.S.A.. The rootbeer is slated on this bottle. Hires must have changed the product a little. because now we have the "improved" root beer. This bottle reads HIRES IMPROVED ROOT BEER / MAKES FIVE GALLONS OF A DELICIOUS DRINK / MANUFACTURED BY THE CHARLES E. HIRES CO. / PHILADELPHIA, PA. U.S.A. Hires then made a slight change to that bottle, providing another variant to look for. This one reads IMPROVED ROOT BEER / MAKES FIVE GALLONS OF A DELICIOUS DRINK MANUFACTURED ONLY BY CHARLES E. HIRES / PHILADELPHIA PA. U.S.A. As you get into some of the late, Hires bottles you ca. find some real pretty shades of blues. and greens, with some of the blues approaching a sapphire, or cobalt color.

By most accounts,. the major boost to the root beer extract business, was attributed to Charles E. Hires. but like anything else, if there is money to be made, others will try to get a part of that business. The following root beer extract bottles, are all from Philadelphia, or close by, and are presumed to all have been in direct competition with Hires.

Our first Philadelphia bottle. is embossed on three sides. FAVORITE CREAM ROOT BEER / EACH BOTTLE MAKES 5 GALLONS / ONLY MANUFACTURED BY FAVORITE MAN'F'G. CO. PHILADA. PA. U.S.A. / fourth side is blank. There is a variant to this bottle, with embossing on all four sides, FAVORITE CREAM ROOT BEER / EACH BOTTLE MAKES 5 GALLONS / MANUFACTURED ONLY BY I FAVORITE MANFG. CO. PHILA, PA. U.S.A.. Next, we have a bottle only embossed on only two sides. Side one is embossed BEAN'S GREAT AMERICAN ROOT BEER EXTRACT. Side two is blank, side three says ROLLER & SHOEMAKER PHILADELPHIA, with side four also blank.

Next are two variants of the Lear's bottles. The first one is embossed LEAR'S PERFECTED ROOT BEER / CONTENTS MAKES 5 GALLONS / LEARMFGCO, LIMITED PHILADELPHIA PA. / SOLE OWNERS AND MANUFACTURES. What makes this interesting, is that they claim to be the sole manufacturers of this product, but so do the people on the second Lear's bottle. One may have been a successor of the other, or they may have just both made the same claim. The variant is embossed LEAR'S PERFECTED ROOT BEER / CONTENTS MAKES 5 GALLONS /SHELLENBERGER & SMITH PHILADELPHIA PA. / SOLE OWNERS AND MANUFACTURERS. Note the spelling differences of the last word on each bottle. That is another one of their differences, not our typing.

Now we go to the champion. It may be safe to presume that part of the marketing technique, was to make your brand sound the best. What better name than the champion? One company put out the following bottle.

CHAMPION ROOT BEER EXTRACT is embossed on side one, side Two is blank side three reads FINNERTY McCLURE & CO PHILADELPHIA. and side four is blank. Also from Philadelphia, is HEINLE'S ROOT BEER / ONE BOTTLE MAKES 5 GALLONS / CHAS. L. HEINLE & Co 2731 KENSINGTON AVE / PHILA, PA. Another bottle,, while not being embossed with the city of Philadelphia, was likely another direct competitor of Hires. and is embossed only on one panel. The other three are blank, This bottle reads THOMPSON'S ROOT BEER EXT. FIVE GALLONS COATESVILLE, PA. spread over four lines.

Now let's move around the country. Have any of you ever heard of MEXICAN ROOT BEER EXTRACT? That is what is on one side of an extract bottle. Probably from Mexico, wouldn't you think? Not a chance! The other three sides of the bottle read MANUFACTURED ONLY BY SHRADER & JOHNSTON / MAKES FIVE GALLONS OF DELICIOUS DRINK / MICHIGAN CITY INDIANA.

The location of the next one should be easier to figure out. BADGER ROOT BEER is on one side of the bottle. There is a clue here, (Wisconsin's state animal is the Badger). The other three sides read THIS BOTTLE MAKES FIVE GALLONS / MANUFACTURED BY WAUKESHA WILD CHERRY PHOSPHATE CO / WAUKESHA, WIS. You can also find several extract bottles that have Milwaukee embossed on them, which include HILBERT'S MILWAUKEE ROOT BEER which is all embossed on one side, with the other three sides plain, and FISHER'S ROOT BEER EXTRACT / A. J. HILBERT & CO. MILWAUKEE, WIS. U.S.A. / MAKES 5 GALLONS ROOT BEER / A. J. HILBERT & CO. MILWAUKEE, WIS, U.S.A.

How many embossed root beer extracts do you know of from Minnesota? Ever heard of TOWLE'S LOG CABIN ROOT BEER? I believe Towle's made a number of food products in addition to this extract. The other three sides of this bottle read THIS BOTTLE MAKES FIVE GALLONS / PREPARED BY THE TOWLE MFG. CO. / ST. PAUL, MINN. USA.

Some of you are aware of the pottery Pa-Poose root beer mugs, which are extremely hard to find- Any idea where they are from? This next extract bottle will help you out. The four sides read PA-POOSE ROOT BEER EXTRACT MANUFACTURED BY E. A. ZATARAIN & SONS INC. / GUARANTEED 100% PURE ORIGINATED 1889 / NEW ORLEANS U.S.A CAPACITY 3 FLUID OUNCES. Now we get to a strange sounding root beer extract that is also from Louisiana. This bottle is clear, and has embossing on all 4 sides. Side one says HORSE SHOE TRADE MARK REG. ROOT BEER EXTRACT, side two says MANUFACTURED BY HORSE SHOE PICKLE WORKS LTD. Side three says GUARANTEED 100% PURE. and side four reads NEW ORLEANS, LA. U.S.A. CAPACITY 3 FLUID OUNCES. While these two bottles are different in their embossing, they are similar enough, including a mold mark on the bottom. to indicate that they were possibly made in the same mold With different side plates.

The next brand tried to make one believe that it had universal market coverage. UNITED STATES ROOT BEER EXTRACT is on the first side. Any guesses as to where it's from? Here is what the other three sides say, MAKES FIVE GALLONS OF A DELICIOUS DRINK / MANUFACTURED ONLY BY UNITED STATES ROOT BEER CO / PITTSBURG PA. U.S.A. We did not inadvertently, leave the "H" off of Pittsburgh, that is how it was spelled for a time many years ago. Another Pittsburgh root beer extract. is 4 7/8" tall, which is a little taller than the typical extract bottle, but in other aspects, is about the same. and is embossed on all four sides. Side one reads GALVIN'S ROOT BEER PITTSBURGH, PA. Side two says THIS BOTTLE MAKES 5 GALLONS, side three says JAS. A. GALVIN PITTSBURGH PA. U.S.A., and the fourth side reads THE ONLY GENUINE.

Now we go to Massachusetts. A non typical sized extract bottle, found in aqua, and with a least two different embossings, is next. This bottle is shaped like many of the patent medicine bottles, and is 6" tall, 2" wide, and 1 1/4" deep, and is of a nice aqua color. The example described has ALLEN'S ROOT BEER EXTRACT embossed on the front panel, with C.E. CARTER embossed on one side panel, LOWELL, MASS is embossed on the other side panel. The next bottle is embossed on one side with BAKER'S INDIAN ROOT BEER EXTRACT. The opposite side gives us the town and state it's from, BAKER EXTRACT COMPANY, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. The other two sides are plain.

Now we go to Maryland The bottle described next has three plain sides, with all the following embossed on the fourth side, AYD'S ROOT BEER EXTRACT, MAKES 5 GALLONS, PREPARED BY JOSEPH AYD, BALTIMORE. A root beer extract bottle with a name similar to the Bakers Indian Root Beer Extract, but with much different embossing, is from New Jersey, and reads BAKER'S 5 MINUTE ROOT BEER EXT. TRENTON, N.J., the other 3 sides are plain. Another New Jersey bottle is embossed on one side TAYLOR'S SARSAPARILLA ROOT BEER TRENTON N.J. This bottle has a paper label loaded ,With information covering the three plain sides.

Hurd's Root Beer extract is very pale aqua in color and says HURD'S ROOT BEER on one panel, the opposite side says THIS BOTTLE MAKES FIVE GALLONS. The extract bottle is 4 5/8" tall, and provides no clue as to where it was from, but there is some evidence from another bottle that the company was out of Raymond, N.H.

Bryant's Root Beer extract bottles come in shades of amber from light to dark, and can also be found in clear, and pale aqua. There are several different embossings for this brand, including at least two different manufacturers. Only two are listed here. Side one reads BRYANT'S ROOT BEER and side two says THIS BOTTLE MAKES FIVE GALLONS. Side three is the one that is usually different, here it reads MANUFACTURF,D BY WILLLAMS DAVIS BROOKS & CO., and side four reads DETROIT, MICH. Another Bryants reads BRYANT'S ROOT BEER THIS BOTTLE MAKES FIVE GALLONS / MANUFACTURED BY MICHIGAN DRUG COMPANY / 3 FL. OZS. DETROIT, MICH. You could make a nice little display using just the different variants of the Bryant's bottles.

Our next item is from St. Louis, MO, and has embossing on all four sides. Side one has 3 FL. 07- on the shoulder & STAR BRAND EXTRACT FOR HOME USE on the side. On the second side, it says MANUFACTURED BY CHAS. A. LIEMKE CO. ST. LOUIS, MO., side three reads LEADING BRAND OF THE WORLD FOR MAKING ROOT BEER- & side four reads GENUINE HAS THIS SIGNATURE CHAS. A. LIEMKE. (Chas. A. Liemke is in script)

Now to Chicago. This bottle is embossed only on three sides. Side one, NYMAN'S PURE JUNIPER EXTRACT AND ROOT BEER Side two reads NYMAN'S EXTRACT CO. CHICAGO ILL. Side three says NYMAN'S PURE MALT LEADER FROM MALT AND HOPS.

This list is not inclusive of all of the embossed extract bottles from these states, but does give you an idea of the range of territory that they came from. Some of these are fairly easy to obtain, some are not. As you can see, there was quite a bit of competition for the root beer extract business in Philadelphia, and through out the rest of the county. There are many more root beer extract bottles that are embossed with a name but no city and state, that are not included in this article.

WHITE TAVERN BRAND ~ GINGER BEER ~ JOHN WYETH & BRO.

GOT THIS FROM A FRIEND, A VERY HARD TO FIND "WHITE TAVERN BRAND GINGER BEER- BREWED AND BOTTLED BY NIAGARA BEVERAGE CORP. ,NIAGARA FALLS N.Y. (1906-1907 RANGE)  LARRY (OWNER OF LARRY'S AUTO BODY,BALLSTON SPA SINCE HE OPENED IT IN 1981) PICKED THIS UP AND WAS KIND ENOUGH TO LET ME GET IT FROM HIM FOR MY COLLECTION,A REAL NICE ADDITION.ON RIGHT WYETH POISON,ONE OF MANY WYETH BOTTLES OUT THERE.

 

NIAGARA FALLS GAZETTE ~ 1927

NIAGARA PRODUCTS COMPANY, FORMERLY THE NIAGARA FALLS
BREWERY, (NIAGARA BEVERAGE CORPORATION) STILL MAINTAINS SAME HIGH STANDARDS OF
• SPRAY BEVERAGES IN A MODIFIED FORM


The Niagara Products company, formerly the Niagara Falls Brewing company (Niagara Beverage Corp.) , is now engaged in the manufacture of cereal beverages which the federal government insists shall be the only substitute for old-time beer. With the quality of its product limited by official restrictions, the local firm has turned also to the manufacture of all
types of soft drinks, specializing in various brands of ginger ale, both sweet and dry. White Tavern, Killarney and Mount" Royal ginger ales are guaranteed to be the leaders of their respective classes, and n o effort has been spared to provide the public with a refreshing beverage par excellence. All other forms of soft drink are required to measure up to the same high standard of quality, but it is in the cereal
drinks,
patterned after the celebrated old Spray Beer, that the management takes especial pride. Established and built in 1885 by a corporation led by Jacob F. Schoellkopf, the Niagara Falls brewery in upper Third street first gained its fame throughout the surrounding territory for the unparalleled excellence of Spray Beer, as created by Louis F. Mayle, the original brew master. The refreshing flavor was obtained only by the use of the purest ingredients; a process which is followed to this day. Only the finest Bavarian hops are imported for u s e in Spray beverages and the Niagara Products company points with pride to the fact that Spray now stands for the same high quality which spread Niagara's fame in the halcyon days of the brewery. The building itself is one of the unusual evidences which prove conclusively the superiority of old time masonry. In preparing the site for its new building, a first and second cellar or sub-cellar were excavated out
of solid rock. Nothing but this same rock, yielded by excavating the cellars, was used in constructing the ornamental edifice that since has b e en the home of Spray products. The building is today as sturdy, and neat in appearance as the day the contractors turned over their work to the Niagara Falls Brewing company, nearly 45 years ago. The same sanitary conditions for manufacture
prevail from roof to sub-cellar, and are in fact considerably improved within the last few years. Fifteen years ago, the s um of $ 8 0 , 0 0 0 was expended in reconstruction work; replacing wooden floors with steel and concrete surfaces, and installing new facilities for increasing still more, the quality of their product. It is one o f the oldest breweries in this section of the United States, yet stands as one of the most completely equipped and presents the paradox of the most modern systems and production methods. John C. Jenny is manager of
the Niagara Products company, the organization formed to carry on the production of the modified Spray products

 

Both cereal and carbonated beverages are produced at the Dotterweich and Koch plants, Dunkirk; Kuhlmann plant. Ellenville; Schwarzenbach Brewery. Galeton; Jamestown brewery; Orange County plant, Middletown: Niagara Beverage Corporation. Niagara: Dotterweich plant, Olean; Rubsam & Horrmann Brewery, Stapleton: and the plant at Watertown. Many other plants in the state are making cereal beverages

 

JOHN WYETH & BROTHER, INC.

The business of John Wyeth & Brother, to which the present corporation of John Wyeth & Brother, Incorporated, has succeeded, was first established as a co partnership between John Wyeth and Frank H. Wyeth in i86o. when they established themselves in the retail Drug business at 1412 Walnut street, where they continued until 1888, having in the meantime admitted to partnership Edward T. Robbins. From the beginning . The business proved successful, and requiring greater facilities the adjoining property 1414 Walnut street was added.' Their preparations soon became recognized by the medical profession and their laboratory was enlarged by the addition of another property, No. 416 Walnut Street, the firm soon thereafter entering regularly into the wholesale manufacturing business. The business was continued until February, 1889, when he entire Walnut Street plant was destroyed by fire, involving a loss of over $500.000. Other quarters were it once secured at 18th and Hamilton Streets, where :they were soon again in position to supply the greater portion of their products to the trade.

With the business thus established temporarily on Hamilton Street, they purchased their present site at Eleventh and Washington Avenue. to which they removed in November, 1889. Since that time several large additions have been added until the capacity of their laboratories to-day is more than triple the original plant established at this location. With this house s closely identified the inauguration of " elegant pharmacy.." and the introduction of the present mode of administering many of the most potent and nauseous remedies in palatable form. It is no doubt to these ,acts that they owe much of their long continued and constantly growing prosperity.

The original firm of John Wyeth & Brother was succeeded in 1899 by John Wyeth & Brother. Inc., the members of the old firm still retaining their several Interests and continuing as executive officers of the company until the present year, when owing to the death of John Wyeth, his son. Stuart Wyeth, succeeded as president of the company.

It may be said in addition to the above that at.one time when Wyeth was a partner of Henry C. Blair at 3th and Walnut streets. Upon the dissolution of the partnership the firm of John Wyeth & Bro. was established. The old Blair store founded by Henry C. Blair in 1838. is still in successful existence under the ownership of H. C. Blair, 3d, and even in comparison with more modern stores presents a handsome appearance. Both of the Wyeth brothers were graduates of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. It is said that when John Wyeth came up for examination prior to graduation. that he answered every question but one in the oral examination that was given him. He was a man of large ability and force of character. Shortly before his death he contributed $1,000 to the Procter Memorial Fund, the firm of Wyeth & Bro. giving an additional $1,000 Edward Dobbins, formerly a partner, but now deceased, was a man of indomitable energy, and it was due to his exertions as a salesman that the goods of the firm were so largely introduced t0 the trade in the United States. The Wyeths have always given great prominence to the elixirs, and it is probable that at on time this line of elegant pharmaceuticals was not equaled by that of any other house in this country they also manufacture an extensive line of compressed pills, suppositories and effervescing salts.

Digger Odell Publications © 2007

 

FERRO CHINA BISLEN ~ MILANO

NOT A RARE BOTTLE, HAVE DUG A FEW BUT A NICE LOOKING BLOWN IN MOLD BOTTLE. I HAVE HAD MANY QUESTIONS ON THEM SO I DUG OUT A CLEAN OLIVE GREEN EXAMPLE (ALSO FOUND IN AMBER,LATER BOTTLE) AND DECIDED TO POST IT WITH SOME INFORMATION.
 
Felice Bisleri (30 November 1851 – 17 September 1921) was an Italian pharmacist, a maker of liquor and freedom fighter under Garibaldi (1865-67).

Bisleri was born in Gerolanuova near Brescia. He established the Felice Bisleri & Co. chemical laboratory in Milano, developing the successful "Ferro-China Bisleri", an amaro (drink) made as an alcohol infusion of cinchona bark, herbs, and iron salts. The company also made the wellselling "Nocera Umbra" mineral water named after Nocera Umbra (1894), as well as the "l'esanofele", a chemical based on quinine, iron and arsenic to combat malaria (1899).[1] Bisleri died in San Pellegrino. The Via Felice Bisleri in Milan is named after him, and the Bisleri mineral water brand still exists.

ADULTERATION AND MISBRANDING 0F FERRO CHINA BISLERI AND OF FERNET BRANCA.

On April 20, 1912, the United States Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania, acting upon a report by the Secretary of Agriculture, filed in the District Court of the United States for said district a libel for the seizure and condemnation of 9 cases, each containing 12 bottles of Ferro China Bisleri, and 11 cases, each containing 12 bottles of Fernet Branca, remaining unsold in the original unbroken packages and in possession of John N. Insley, Carnegie, Pa., alleging that the product had been shipped on or about February 29, 1912, by N. Annunziato, Yonkers, N. Y., and transported from the State of New York into the State of Pemisylvania, and charging adulteration and misbranding in violation of the Food and Drugs Act. The Ferro China Bisleri was branded: (On cases) “F rageli. Bevete Ferro China Bisleri. F B 12 bottles Bisleri’s Bitters Galls 2.71. Made in Italy. John N. Insley Carnegie, Pa. from N. Annunziato 205 So Wavery St. Yonkers, N. Y.” (On bottles) “Ferro-China Bisleri Bisleri’s Bitters (‘ontaining Alcohol 33 per cent. Manufactured by Felice Bisleri Milan (Italy) Drink plain or with water seltzer or vermouth. G. Ceribelli & C. New York, Sole Agents for the United

States and Canada Registered Trade Mar .” The Fernet Branca was branded: (On cases) “L. Gandolfi & Co. New York Sole Agents in The United States Mexico Canada Cuba and Porto Rico Pessagno Montressor Litre 11.16 Frate1liBranca e Co. Fernet Branca Fratelli Branca de Milano Fornitori di’s M’il Re D’Italia.” (On bottles) “Fernet-Branca Flli Branca Milan (Italy) L. Gandolfi and C. New York. Sole Importers for the United States, Mexico, Canada, Cuba & Porto-Rico. Guaranteed by L. Gandolfi & Co., New York, Agents Under the Food and Drug Act June 30, 1906. Serial No. 2831."
JOHN M. MURPHY, UTICA N.Y.                    L.H. THOMAS INK CO. CHICAGO ILL.

A NICE QUART SIZE FLASK FROM JOHN MMURPHY OUT OF UTICA N.Y. NOT A RARE FLASK BUT GETTING HARDER TO FIND LIKE ALL EMBOSSED STRAP SIDES ARE.

AN ICE BLUE L.H. THOMAS INK CO. WELL FROM 1880'S AS WELL, BOTH ARE PRETTY HARD TO FIND AND BOTH CAME FROM THE ALBANY BOTTLE SHOW.

 

 (L.H.THOMAS INK CO.) The manufacture of paper bottles is said to be becoming an important industry at Chicago, and the process adopted is that invented by Mr L. H. Thomas. These paper bottles, which can.be made of all shapes and sizes, are cheaper than those made of glass or other material, although, from the published description of the process, this would hardly seem to be possible. A sheet of paper cemented on one side is rolled on a mandrel, after which the neck is fashioned, and a bottom of paper or wood inserted into the cylindrical vessel An outer glazed-paper covering is next added; and the interior of the bottle is lined with a fluid composition, which speedily becomes hard, and resists alkalies, acids, spirits, and everything else. The bottles are unbreakable, and require no packing in transit. For various purposes, such as the carriage of ink, blacking, varnishes, and paints, these bottles will doubtless be found useful; but for wines, spirits, medicines, &c., glass, which has the advantages of transparency and great cleanliness, is likely to hold its own. "We have had several inquiries relative to the possibility of obtaining paper bottles in this country, similar to those mentioned in European journals. W e have just seen a statement in The American Stationer that Mr. L. H. Thomas, maker of ink, at 59 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, has commenced the manufacture of these bottles. They are about two-thirds as heavy as glass, and can hardly be broken by usual accidents."

Blodgett, J. The bill in this case seeks an injunction against the defendant Ailing, restraining him from entering into the employment of the other defendant, the L. H. Thomas Company, and for other relief. The material allegations of the bill, so far as necessary for the disposition of the case, are: That on the 2d day of January, 1888, and for many years prior thereto, complainants were and had been co partners doing business under the firm name and style of Carter, Dinsinore & Co., engaged in the business of manufacturing and selling inks and mucilage, having their manufactory and principal office in the city of Boston, in the state ofMassachusetts, with depots or warehouses in the city of New York and the city of Chicago; that in the conduct of their business they had employed, and still employ, traveling agents, canvassers, and salesmen, to introduce and sell the products of their manufacture throughout the United States and Canada; that the inks so manufactured and sold by complainants have always been known to the trade and to the public under the name of "Carter's Inks;" and that under said name such inks, and the mucilage manufactured by the firm, have, by reason of their excellence, and through the means of such traveling men, canvassers, and salesmen, as well as by extensive advertising at large expense to complainants, become widely and favorably known throughout the United States and Canada, as well as in various foreign countries, whereby complainants have established a large and profitable business in the manufacture and sale of said products throughout the United States and Canada; that about the year 1881 the defendant Edward H. Ailing entered into the employment of said firm as a general salesman, involving the duties of canvassing, and introducing samples 'to and soliciting the trade of customers, and in part of selling to the trade, and to the advertising departments of such business. It is further alleged that on the 2d day of January, 1888, the said Ailing entered into a certain written agreement with complainants for a further employment by them, by which agreement Ailing agreed to work for complainants in the traveling, canvassing, and advertising departments of their business, and to do work in such other departments as they might request, from January 1, 1888, to July 1, 1890, for which service complainants were to pay him as salary $200 per month during said two and a half years, and at the expiration of said two and a half years a further sum, calculated upon a percentage of the net profits of the firm for the entire period of such employment, over and above the amount of said monthly payments, complainants also to pay all of Alling's traveling expenses. It was also provided by the contract that either party might terminate the same by giving one month's notice in writing, provided the other failed to comply with all the terms and provisions therein expressed. Ailing, in and by the contract, further covenantedthat he would not, within three years from the termination of his employment by complainants, whenever that might be, travel, canvass, or advertise for, or otherwise assist any one engaged in, nor himself engage directly or indirectly in, any line of business carried on or contemplated at the time of the termination of his employment by the complainant, nor furnish information directly or indirectly to any one engaged or interested in any such line of business. He further agreed not to communicate during the continuance of said agreement, or at any time subsequently, any information relating to the secrets of the traveling, advertising, and canvassing departments, nor any knowledge or secrets which he then had or might from time to time acquire pertaining to the other departments of the business of said complainants, to any person not a member of complainants' firm, except as requested in writing by complainants; and in case of violation of said covenant the defendant Ailing agreed to pay complainants or their legal successors the sum of $5,000 as liquidated damages, but such payment was not to release him from the obligations undertaken, or from liability for further breach thereof. And it was further provided that, in case of any termination whatever of said contract, the obligations of the defendant Ailing, as expressed in the covenant just recited, should remain in full force. The bill further charges that the defendant Ailing left the employment of complainants in the month of January, 1889, and that he soon thereafter entered into the employment of the defendant the L. H. Thomas Company, which is a corporation organized under the laws of the state of Illinois, for the purpose, among other things, of manufacturing and selling inks and mucilage; that its manufactory is located in the vicinity of the city of Chicago, and its principal office is in the city of Chicago; and that the business of the said L. H. Thomas Company is of the same nature with that of complainants, and is conducted in substantially the same manner,—by the employment of canvassers and traveling salesmen, and by advertising and selling its products throughout the country,—and that it is a competitor with complainant in such business. The bill also' charges that the defendant the L. H. Thomas Company was fully advised at the time of employing Ailing of his obligation to complainants under the agreement of January 2, 1888, and that complainants fear that in the course of his employment with said L. H. Thomas Company, Ailing is communicating to and using for the benefit of said company the information which he has obtained as an employe of complainants'concern, and the methods of complainants' business, and will communicate to said company the trade secrets pertaining to complainants' business so acquired by him while in complainants' employ, and will avail himself of such trade secrets to promote the business and further the interests of said company as a competitor of complainants, to the great and irreparable injury of complainants. The bill prays an injunction restraining Ailing, for a period of three years from the termination of his employment with complainants, from traveling, canvassing for. and otherwise assisting the L. H. Thomas Company, or any other corporations or persons engaged in, or from himself engaging directly or indirectly in, the business of manufacturing or selling inks, writing fluids, and mucilage, and ^rom furnishing any information, directly or indirectly, to the L. H. Thomas Company, and to any other person or corporation engaged in or interested iu such business, or from communicating directly or indirectly to any such person or corporation any information relating to the secrets of the traveling, advertising, or canvassing departments of complainants' fiTm. And that the L. H. Thomas Company, its officers, agents, and employes, may also be enjoined and restrained for a like period from employing Ailing to travel, canvass, or advertise for, and otherwise assist said company in the business of manufacturing and selling inks, writing fluids, and mucilage.

There is no dispute as to the facts in the case. It is conceded that complainants were manufacturers and sellers of inks, etc., as charged in their bill; that Ailing entered into complainants' employ under this contract, and continued in their service, as a traveling salesman and canvasser and advertiser of their inks, up to about the 20th of January, 1889, at or about Which time difficulties arose between said parties touching the manner in which Ailing should conduct the business for complainants, and he was notified that complainants had discharged him; and that within a very short time after such discharge defendant Ailing became connected with the said L. H. Thomas Company as its president, taking the general charge and management of its affairs, including the selling of its inks, mucilage, bluing, and writing fluids; and that the other officers of the L. H. Thomas Company were duly notified, at or before the time when Ailing went into their employ-in the capacity aforesaid, of his obligations under said contract to complainants"

The language of the contract implies that when the plaintiffs joined the defendant in his new business they had confidence in his mechanical skill and ingenuity, and intended to avail themselves of it for the benefit of the business in which he induced them to embark, and that it was a material part of the consideration for which they paid him so considerable a sum and invested their capital. It was not in restraint of trade nor contrary to public policy that the defendant should contract to render to the plaintiffs his exclusive services in this respect. This part of the contract he is alleged to have violated

 

 CARTERS INK 'S                                                                                      CAMBRIDGE,MASS. 

VERY HARD TO GET HOLD OF, 1 GALLON SIZE  "CARTERS INK" STONEWARE JUG. DATING TO EARLY 1900,S 2 TONE WITH POUR SPOUT AND PRINTED WITH PICTURE LABEL TO BOOT, A FAVORITE DISPLAY THERE ARE A FEW VARIATIONS OF STONEWARE INK JUGS BY CARTER INKS . THIS IS A 3 CITY VARIANT.NICE!

 

 

HERE IS THE EVER FAMOUS CARTERS INK CATHEDRAL MASTER INK. THESE CAME IN A FEW SIZES AND ARE ALWAYS A POPULAR BOTTLE. RARITY.......NOT SUPER RARE BUT AGAIN BECAUSE OF THE DISPLAY APPEAL THEY ALWAYS DO WELL IN GOOD CONDITION. DATING TO THE 1900'S WITH THE CLOVERLEAF INKWELL BEING THE MOLD BLOWN ONE.ONLY EVER SEEN THEM IN COBALT BLUE.

 

 

 

                                      

 

 

 

 

  
The Carter's Ink Company building at 245 1st Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts

 The William Carter Company, the forerunner of Carter's Ink, was founded in 1858 by Boston stationer, William Carter who, in order to supplement his paper sales, had started repackaging other companies' inks and selling them under his own name. In 1860, William Carter's brother, Edward Carter, joined thecompany and the firm became known as "William Carter and Bro."

The Civil War disrupted Carter's primary ink supplier, so William Carter obtained the use of its formulas on a royalty basis and started making his own inks and mucilage, which necessitated the move to a larger building. Another brother, John H. Carter, joined the company, which became "William Carter & Bros."In 1865 William's cousin, John W. Carter, joined the enterprise and the name became "Carter Bros. & Company." John W. Carter focused his efforts on the ink part of the business which, along with the sales efforts of James P. Dinsmore, resulted in such growth that the ink business was separated from the paper business and moved into its own quarters in 1868."

The entire firm and both of its divisions and their separate buildings were destroyed the night of November 9, 1872, in what has been called the Great Boston Fire of 1872. All that was left was the company's good will and its formulas.

After the fire in 1872, John W. Carter teamed up with James P. Dinsmore to buy the ink division and start a new firm known as "Carter, Dinsmore and Company." The new company thrived and by 1884 had become the largest ink producer in the world. Contributing to this growth was John W. Carter's belief in and commitment to research to develop new and better inks.

James P. Dinsmore retired in 1888, and John W. Carter drowned in 1895, which created an organizational crisis in the unincorporated enterprise, which led to its incorporation later that year as "The Carter's Ink Company.

 

 CARTERS INK                                                                                                                  ADVERTISING

      

WILLIAM RADAM'S MICROBE KILLER
I HAVE OWNED 3 OF THESE IN MY YEARS OF COLLECTING AS I WAS HOOKEDTHE FIRST TIME I EVER SAW ONE.  2 WERE THE ALL TO TYPICAL VERY WEAK EMBOSSED ONES. THE THIRD WAS A REAL NICE STRIKE BUT VERY DARK AMBER AND WAS TRADED OFF....THIS ONE IS STAYING, GREAT STRIKE & COLOR THAT PASSES LIGHT FOR DISPLAY OF ONE OF THE MOST RECOGNIZED TRADE MARKS IN BOTTLE COLLECTING.I HAVE A PAGE WITH MUCH MORE INFORMATION ON THIS SO BE SURE TO CHECK IT OUT...THANKS
 
William Radam and the Microbe Killer
An Account of Classic Medical Quackery from the Heart of Texas
By Daniel R. Barnett
Since its annexation into the United States in 1845, Texas has provided a home to its share of medical quacks who made their living off of the desperate and the scientifically illiterate. Of the many Texan nostrum peddlers throughout history, however, William Radam probably perpetrated the biggest medicinal hoax of all with his celebrated Microbe Killer. This elixir was even more successful because it made its debut just as the link between microbes and disease was first being documented – but, as science would eventually demonstrate, the Microbe Killer was absolutely worthless.

William Radam was a native of Prussia, and once served in the Prussian army; however, his first love was gardening. Radam eventually moved to Austin, Texas, and established a gardening store and nursery, tending to his 30 acres of land for nearly two decades. Then he was taken ill with malaria, and sought out doctors who prescribed various drugs for him; in his 1890 book Microbes and the Microbe Killer, Radam stated: "I swallowed the contents of bottle after bottle, until their number became too great for calculation. I took quinine until it failed to have any effect." Rheumatism and sciatica made Radam's life even more difficult, and then two of his own children died. At that point, the broken-hearted and ailing Radam, no longer strong enough to attend to his affairs, began his own quest to cure himself.

Perusing through medical journals, Radam found no remedies within their pages, but he did discover microbes. For the first time in history, physicians and scientists such as Pasteur and Koch were able to prove a definitive link between certain microbes and disease, and Radam was convinced that all of his illnesses, including his rheumatism and sciatica, were caused by multitudes of microbes that had invaded his body. Hearkening back to his gardening background, Radam got the idea that killing microbes in the human body was similar to killing bugs that attacked plants. "Disease is fermentation," Radam later wrote, "and fermentation without microbes is impossible. Therefore disease must be accompanied by microbes." Using his gardening books and his microscope to try and find a cure for human ailments, Radam finally produced a liquid that he considered a universal and non-poisonous antiseptic, and Radam dubbed this new discovery the Microbe Killer.

"The microbe killer," Radam later wrote, "cannot be compared with ordinary drugs. It does not contain any of them. It is pure water, permeated with gases which are essential to the nourishment of the system, and in which micro-organisms cannot live and propagate, or fermentation exist." The new concoction could be imbibed in almost the same way that water could, enabling the patient to continue using the Microbe Killer until "the tissues shall be thoroughly soaked with it, and the blood becomes perfectly purified." Radam
began drinking the liquid for six months, after which he claimed a full cure of all of his ailments after the last noxious microbe in his body bit the dust.

Radam was convinced that his discovery could cure anyone, but also wary that he could face manslaughter charges if he gave the Microbe Killer to someone who eventually died from the doctor-prescribed medications he took along with Radam's elixir. Thus, he discreetly gave away a couple of jugs filled with Microbe Killer to a few ailing patrons, who claimed a full recovery from their ailments soon afterwards. People began traveling to Austin, begging the gardener for the Microbe Killer; soon Radam was so busy making
Microbe Killer that his garden was overrun with weeds, and Radam decided to make his new discovery his full-time occupation.

Radam patented the Microbe Killer on September 28, 1886, but stressed that the liquid's ability to "kill all fungus, germs, parasites, and other matter producing fermentation or decay" was meant for preserving food, not for treating disease. After reportedly showing off the Microbe Killer in Dallas at the State Fair of Texas, Radam began selling his
new elixir by the jug. The first Microbe Killer jugs appear to have been salt-glaze jugs manufactured by Meyer Pottery in Atascosa, just south of San Antonio. Radam's first printed advertisement for the Microbe Killer may have been in the August 30, 1887, issue of the Austin Statesman; he secured the trademark for Microbe Killer on December 13 that same year.

And what a trademark! It featured a healthy young man, clothed in a business suit, swinging a club at a fearful skeleton whose scythe already lay at its feet, smashed to pieces. If Radam was ambivalent at that time about claims that the Microbe Killer could cure disease, the trademark seemed to drive the message home: the Microbe Killer could conquer death.

How would the medical profession respond to the German gardener's panacea? Radam warned that physicians "have known how to blindfold the people and keep them in ignorance of the first principles of Nature's laws and operations, just as the Salvation Army misleads the ignorant and rules its devotees with the terrors of an alleged Satan." The surgeon's tools "are the means of destroying more lives in our hospitals and colleges than are the weapons of all our desperadoes and lawbreakers." Champions of natural science like Pasteur unlocked the secrets of microbes, but they were so intent on theories instead of facts that their shortsighted observations allowed a humble gardener to step forth with a sure cure for all of mankind's afflictions. Even nostrums that claimed to purify blood were just as dangerous as doctors; Radam observed that "The public likes to be humbugged." Better to simply try the Microbe Killer and start destroying the microbes that plagued oneself rather than waste one's time with anything else.

Enough Americans were so willing to try the Microbe Killer that in 1888, Radam used some of his new fortune to build the Koppel Building on the site where his old nursery once stood. By 1890, Radam had taken leave of Austin for New York City, setting up his laboratory and main office at No. 7 Laight Street while settling into a mansion on Fifth Avenue with a great view of Central Park. The one-time gardener now operated seventeen factories across America that produced bottles and jugs of the Microbe Killer in three different strengths, many of them now boldly bearing the phrase "CURES ALL DISEASES" underneath the trademark. Radam's shop on Broadway offered a free glass of the Microbe Killer to anybody who walked in. Potential customers could also see pictures of the dreaded microbes in Radam's new book, the distinctive Microbe Killer logo stamped in gold on the front cover of each copy.

Trademark
Trademark for the Microbe Killer. Note the broken
scythe lying at the skeleton’s feet
    — Microbes and the Microbe Killer

And then the first serious challenge to the Microbe Killer presented itself. R.G. Eccles, a physician and pharmacist from Long Island College Hospital, published a report detailing his own analysis of the Microbe Killer. Eccles reported that the Microbe Killer was merely water mixed with miniscule amounts of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid. Radam immediately went on the warpath while defending his Microbe Killer at the same time. The 1886 patent revealed that Radam manufactured Microbe Killer by mixing powdered sulfur, sodium nitrate, manganese oxide, sandalwood, and potassium chloride and burning the mixture in an oven; the vapors mixed with vapor from water located in a closed tank in which the oven sat. After the treated water was allowed to condense and then filtered to remove any sediment, a tiny amount of wine was added to give the Microbe Killer a light pink tint. Radam swore, "I have never bought nor used one dollar's worth of sulphuric or muriatic acid to make my Microbe Killer." He conferred with his attorneys to launch a libel suit against Eccles.

Eccles was not deterred. He called Radam a "misguided crank" who was intent on "out-quacking the worst quacks of this or any other age" while realizing profits of 6,000% from his worthless cure-all. (One analysis of the Microbe Killer by the Department of Agriculture placed the water content of Microbe Killer at 99.381%.) Furthermore, Eccles started laying the groundwork for his own suit against Radam because the latter had called Eccles a charlatan. Eccles' suit was the first to make it to trial, and he sought $20,000 in damages from Radam in a Brooklyn court.

Radam's newly-acquired wealth allowed him to retain the agnostic philosopher Robert Ingersoll as his attorney for the Brooklyn trial and the man who would eventually manage the American interests of I.G. Farben as his chemical expert. Despite these safeguards, the trial went badly for Radam. Once on the witness stand, the gardener couldn't place
calla lillies, poppies, or even potatoes in their proper botanical orders. (Radam insisted this was because he forgot these superfluous facts ever since discovery of the Microbe Killer.) Even the surprise admission of Radam's expert witness that Radam did indeed use hydrochloric and sulfuric acids to create his concoction – for which mankind should be grateful to Radam for discovering the process – could not prevent the Brooklyn jury from awarding Eccles $6,000.

Radam appealed the verdict, fired Ingersoll, and pursued his own case against Eccles in a Manhattan courtroom. The gardener was kept off the witness stand by his new attorneys, who argued the case on a legal technicality by stating that Eccles failed to detail each point of his arguments against the Microbe Killer. The judge charged the jury to rule in favor of Radam, who walked out of the courtroom with a $500 award. Despite the fact that Radam was $5,500 short overall at that point (the Brooklyn award was
eventually reversed), he called the Manhattan verdict "a complete vindication of the unjust charges and libelous attack" on his Microbe Killer and proclaimed the victory in newspapers and pamphlets. He also warned Eccles during the trial that if Eccles made any further attacks on the Microbe Killer, he would be "challenged to mortal combat" by Radam.

Radam
William Radam, gardener turned quack medicine peddler extraordinaire.
    — Microbes and the Microbe Killer

Once again, Eccles continued his attacks undaunted, but the promised duel never materialized. Radam realized that Eccles' reports were printed in drug trade journals, which
were read by almost nobody outside the profession – but Radam's advertisements ran in newspapers across America, which everybody read. His fortunes were therefore secure. In fact, it seemed that the only thing Radam could not do with his money was take it with him when he finally passed away in 1902. His body was returned to Texas and buried at Oakwood Cemetery in Austin.

The Microbe Killer, on the other hand, continued to be produced and sold not only throughout America, but also around the world. A factory in London churned out Microbe Killer jugs for British customers, while Melbourne Glassworks manufactured Microbe Killer bottles from 1900 until around 1912 for sale to Australians. Even after American journalist Samuel Hopkins Adams exposed the Microbe Killer in his landmark exposé‚ The Great American Fraud and the Pure Food and Drugs Act (America's first major anti-quackery legislation) was signed into law in 1906, the Microbe Killer apparently still realized a handsome profit for Radam's successors.

Ten years after Radam's death, however, a Kentucky congressman named Swagar Sherley introduced a bill on Capitol Hill designed to compensate for some of the deficiencies in the Pure Food and Drugs Act. Known as the Sherley Amendment, it declared that a drug was misbranded, and therefore illegal:

    ...if its package or label shall bear or contain any statement, design, or device regarding the curative or therapeutic effect of such article or any of the ingredients or substances contained therein, which is false and fraudulent.

The Sherley Amendment was passed by Congress with far less controversy and fanfare than the Pure Food and Drugs Act; President William Howard Taft signed it into law in 1912. The Bureau of Chemistry, the precursor of the FDA, began analyzing numerous patent medicines to see if their manufacturers could be hauled into court for violating the Sherley Amendment. Out of hundreds of nostrums investigated by the government, the Microbe Killer, which still touted its efficacy in treating disease, was the first to be targeted.

In the latter half of 1913, Federal agents raided a freight car and seized a large amount of Microbe Killer cartons en route from New York to Minneapolis. The bottles and jugs seized had a retail value of $5,166; government investigators estimated that the cost of producing the shipment at only $25.82. Carl L. Alsberg, chief of the Bureau of Chemistry, prosecuted the case against the Microbe Killer in court, indicating that the only effect of the minute amount of sulfuric acid present in the concoction would be to irritate the stomach and upper intestine of many people. The Microbe Killer attorney then asked Alsberg if his only complaint was against the inflammation caused by the medicine as it passed through the alimentary tract.

    Alsberg: What we are complaining of is more than that. It is the fact that a man may be very sick and use this medicine until it is too late to use something else.

    Q: Then it is the time he loses?

  Alsberg: The time he loses may be sometimes the difference between life and death.

Despite numerous testimonials provided by the defense, the Minneapolis jury found that the Microbe Killer had violated the Sherley Amendment and recommended the destruction of the entire confiscated shipment; the district attorney stated, "I favor using an ax." Thus, in December 1913, under the watchful eye of a US marshal and a food and drug inspector, all 539 boxes and 322 cartons of Microbe Killer seized by the government were hauled into a pit in St. Paul. The boxes and cartons were broken open and then set on fire, and the bottles and jugs of Microbe Killer were smashed. This event apparently marked the beginning of the end for Radam's company and his cure-all.


Today, the Koppel Building, built with Radam's money, still stands down the street from the capitol building in Austin, Texas. It has reportedly served over the past century as a hotel, a feed store, and even a brothel. Despite renovations in 1984, the Koppel Building remains faithful to its original architecture and now serves as the home of TateAustin, a
public relations firm. As for the Microbe Killer itself, some jugs and bottles of the elixir still survive to this day and have become prized collectors' items – especially if they feature Radam's distinctive trademark stamped on the front. Aside from these, however, there is little else to remind the average Texan that a Prussian-born gardener once made a fortune in Austin over a century ago by peddling a potion that allegedly cured all diseases by ridding the body of microbes.

On the other hand, the discoveries made by Pasteur, Koch, and others regarding microbes served as the foundation for modern clinical understanding of microbes and disease, leading to an improved overall quality of life that Radam's Microbe Killer could never deliver.

A correspondent asks for information concerning "Radam's Microbe Killer," as he has a patient with cancer whose family are strongly urging the use of this nostrum.

"Radam's Microbe Killer" was shown up by Mr. Adams in his "Great American Fraud" series and also in the report of the Australia Royal Commission. This nostrum had a great vogue some years ago and then seemed to drop out of notice; apparently, however, it has been revived recently and is being pushed vigorously, especially ;n New York City and on the Pacific coast. A few months ago the federal government seized a consignment of this preparation (see index) and served notice on the firm in whose possession it was found. The court decided that the product should be destroyed and that the firm in question shall pay all the costs of the proceedings. The "Notice of Judgment" published by the government did not give in detail the results of the government analysis, but application to the Department of Agriculture regarding the composition of this nostrum brought the following letter:

"The acting secretary has officially authorized giving you the information relative to the composition of 'Radam's Microbe Killer.' The results are as follows:

"Sulphuric acid 0.59 per cent.   "Sulphurous acid 0.016 per cent.

"Inorganic matter (ash) '. 0.013 per cent.      "Water by difference 00.381 per cent.

"The above clearly shows that 'Radam's Microbe Killer' is a mixture of sulphuric acid and sulphurous acid dissolved in ordinary hydrant water. It is quite possible that the sulphuric acid may have been present in part as sulphurous acid." (From The Journal A. M. A., July 16, 1910.)
1900's FLY TRAP ~ CHARLES GULDEN MUSTARD JAR

1900'S HANGING FLY TRAP,THESE DO WORK ALTOUGH CLEANING THEM KIND OF SUCKS ~  DUG THIS RECENTLY, BASE EMBOSSED GULDENS AND FROM WHAT I HAVE FOUND NOT VERY COMMON AT ALL, DATING TO LATE 1800S.

 

Charles Gulden was born on September 23, 1843, in New York City. By the age of 15, he was employed as an engraver. Two years later, he went to work for his uncle, who owned the Union Mustard Mills. After serving with a reserve regiment at Gettysburg during the Civil War, he returned briefly to his uncle's shop.

Gulden opened his own mustard company in 1862. He chose Elizabeth Street in New York for his shop, near South Street Seaport, where he could easily obtain the mustard seeds and spices necessary to mix with vintage vinegars.

By 1883, Gulden's product line included 30 mustard varieties and other products, including olives, capers, cottonseed oil, catsup, and Warwickshire sauce. That year, he moved down the street into a six-story building.

Drawing from his earlier experience as an engraver, Charles Gulden once asked his brother: "Do you think it would help if we were to attach a spoon to each bottle of No. 6, no extra charge?" Soon, the Guldens were attaching fine, imported spoons to each bottle.

Gulden's mustard won awards in 1869 and 1883. It also earned awards at the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, the Paris Exposition in 1900, the Sesquicentennial International Exposition in Philadelphia in 1926, and the Napa Valley Mustard Festival in 2005. However, the Gulden's mustard sold today is not the same formula as the mustard that won the awards in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

SUFFOLK BITTER'S
 
bottles, flasks & jars, Massachusetts, A 'SUFFOLK BITTERS PHILBROOK & TUCKER BOSTON' figural pig bitters bottle with applied double collar. Dazzling color in a brilliant yellow, orange and plenty of whittle.   
 
 
 
The Suffolk Bitters in Pig form, this is a popular reproduction from the late 60s, early 70s. Originals only came in color similar to this with a different lip treatment and embossed SUFFOLK BITTERS Front & PHILBROOK & TUCKER BOSTON " on flip side. This one on flip side reads "AMERICA'S SUFFOLK BITTER'S LIFE PRESERVER"These are found in 7-8 colors from cobalt to teal green .
 
 
 
bottles, flasks & jars, Massachusetts, A 'SUFFOLK BITTERS PHILBROOK & TUCKER BOSTON' figural pig bitters bottle with applied double collar. Dazzling color in a brilliant yellow, orange and plenty of whittle.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Philbrook & Tucker
 
63 & 108 Blackstone St., Boston, Massachusetts, 
 
 
Boston Directory: 1840 Philbrook, Jas.; 1849-50, Philbrook, Geo.; 1870-74 Philbrook & Tucker (Joseph W. Philbrook & Herman Tucker); 1875 Philbrook & Co. (J.W. Philbrook); 1880 Philbrook & Co. (Thomas G. Anderson) 
JOHNSON'S  AMERICAN ANODYNE LINIMENT
Abner Johnson (1786-1847)
Waterford, Maine
 
 
 
For coughs, colds, grippy cold, colic, asthmatic distress, bronchial colds, nasal catarrh, cholera morbus, cramps, diarrhea, bruises, common sore throat, burns and scalds, chaps and chafing, chilblains, frost bites, muscular rheumatism, soreness, sprains and strains

 From The Newfoundlander, February 11, 1873:Used internally and externally, will relieve the worst cases of....Cramp or Pain in the Limbs, Stomach or Bowels, Lame Stomach, Spitting of Blood...for all Diseases of the Throat, Lungs and Head...the Bite of Mosquitoes...

In 1893, The Cambridge Tribune declared Generation After Generation Have Used It. Dropped on Sugar, Children Love to Take It! It was loaded with Morphine & Alcohol
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

  SMITHS GREEN MT. DOSE GLASS ~ IRON MILK  "IT MAKES BLOOD "   ~  STAR LIQUOR ADV.  1940S

THIS IS BY FAR ONE OF MY FAVORITE ADVERTISING PIECES AND NEW OLD STOCK AS WELL. THEY JUST DON'T MAKE CLASSY ADS LIKE THIS ANYMORE. AN ERA GONE BY, THE STORE HAS MOVED SLIGHTLY DOWN THE STREET BUT IS IN BUSINESS YET TODAY.

NOW CALLED ~ Star Liquors & Wines

WAS AT 1138 AND NOW AT 1142 STATE STREET,SCHENECATDY N.Y.

 STAR LIQUOR is in the Liquor Stores industry in SCHENECTADY, NY. This company currently has approximately 10 to 20 employees and annual sales of $1000000

 

 

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 PRETTY HARD TO GET SMITH'S GREEN MOUNTAIN RENOVATOR DOSE CUP.

SMITH'S GREEN MOUNTAIN RENOVATOR 40 years of success in Vermont For coughs, colds, and consumption Spirit of the Times (Batavia, NY) November 19, 1898 Embossing: SMITH'S GREEN MOUNTAIN RENOVATOR EAST GEORGIA VT

 

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SPERM SEWING MACHINE OIL

Sperm Sewing Machine Oil
Sperm whale oil is very light and fine, and it has a low freezing point. As a result, it was used to lubricate fine machinery such as clocks, watches, and sewing machines from colonial times into the 20th century.
Manufactured by O'Donell Mfg. Co. St Louis Missouri.on right but same bottle has been found with labels from a few other states/companies.
 INK WELLS                                                                                 CARTERS ~ MA & PA

THIS IS A FAVORITE DISPLAY WITH THE INSERTS AND ALL IN TACT MAKES IT VERY COLLECTABLE. THERE ARE MODERN VERSIONS OR FAKES OUT THERE SO BE CAREFUL WHERE YOU GET THIS STLE INKWELL FROM,FIND A REPUTABLE DEALER. ALWAYS A NICE DESK DISPLAY AND DATING TO AFTER TURN OF CENTURY. SOLID BRASS WITH GLASS INSERTS. ON THE RIGHT THE EVER POPULAR AND SOMETIMES RARE IN SETS,SEEM TO COME AROUND IN SPURTS.MA & PA CARTER INKS. THESE ARE GREAT AND ALWAYS A REAL EASY SALE IF LISTED FOR SURE. DATING TO  EARLY 1900,S RANGE FROM CARTERS INK COMPANY. VERY COOL INKS

H.K. MULFORD CO CHEMISTS, PHILADELEPHIA ~  EBENEZER PEARL TINCTURE, ORISKANY NY
 
 
 
Ebenezer A. Pearl's / Tincture of Life if aqua, rectangular, and 7 3/4 inches tall. I have been told by fellow collector Mark Yates that he had one with label and was from Oneida, NY. Attempts to gather more information from the public library and historical society there have not been fruitful. The product was advertised for coughs, colds, sore throats, etc. in the Boonville Herald (NY) February 16, 1888.

After moving from Connecticut to New York, Ebenezer Pearl married Lucy Cole, born 1786 in Sterling, CT.  She had come with her parents to NY when she was about 6 years old. Ebenezer married her in Fairfield, NY. They had 8 children, one of whom was Ebenezer A. Pearl born 1811 in NY. Ebenezer A. served in the Civil War and was pensioned out early in the war with $8.00 per month, Invalid Pension. In the 1860 and 1870 censuses he is listed as a peddler. He created and sold ‘Ebenezer A. Pearl’s Tincture of Life’*. He married Harriet M. ?? and had 8 children, one of whom was Aurilla Pearl, born 1852 in NY. Aurilla married William Brand, but unfortunately he died young after falling off a ladder, breaking his neck. He was only 29 years of age. He left Aurilla with 4 children 
The H. K. Mulford Co. has had a remarkable business growth. The venture was first conducted by H. K. Mulford as H. K. Mulford & Co.. who succeeded to the business formerly conducted by Remington & Sayre at 1800 Market street. the oldest drug store in Philadelphia, founded in 1823 by W. R. Simes, who afterwards became prominent as a manufacturer o f refined camphor.

Mr. Mulford was joined by Milton Campbell and E.V. Pechin and the business was incorporated under the laws of Pennsylvania as the H. K. Mulford Co. in 1891 The officers 4 the firm are: Milton Campbell, president; H. K. Mulford, vice-president; E. V. Pechin ,secretary: L. P. Faucett, treasurer; A. T. Rickards. assistant treasurer. Of these. Mr. Campbell, Mr. Mulford, and Mr. Pechin are graduates of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and prior to their engage ment in the manufacturing business were each individually engaged it the retail drug business. From a business of scarcely $15,000 per year the annual sales of the company have increased until at the present time they exceed $2,000,000 per year; the Company has a paid-in capital of $1,000,000, a handsome surplus. and branch houses in New York, Chicago. St. Louis, San Francisco, and 'Minneapolis.. with a large business in foreign countries.

The development of the business since its establishment at 1800 Market street as a retail drug store has been phenomenal. The Company was early obliged to seek adjoining properties, and in 1897 the property at 13th and Waverly streets was purchased. The business continued to grow andadditional properties were secured in 1902 and 1907, that obtained last year at 11th and Catharine streets embracing practically an entire block. As might be expected, enormous laboratory facilities are required by this house. The buildings on 13th street contain the various research, chemical and analytical laboratories, manufacturing laboratories for pharmaceutical specialties, tablets, capsules, etc., the printing and binding establishments, and the various departments of stock, sales, shipping, mailing, foreign business, and the like. The tablet department alone has a daily capacity of 8, 500,000 tablets. The laboratories at 11th and Catharine streets are used for the preparation of crude drugs, milling, etc., and the manufacture of pharmaceutical and chemical preparations, assayed and physiologically standardized pharmace ticals, embracing solids, fluid and powdered extrac tinctures, etc. The work of the analytical laboratories under the direction of Charles E. Vanderkleed and a corps of trained assistants. A laboratory of original research is maintained, and the scientific department under the direction of F. E. Stewart. M. D.. Ph. G.

In this connection the H. K. Mulford Co. designs builds, and constructs on its own premises practical all the machinery used for the manufacture of its preparations and employs a large and competent corps of skilled machinists and mechanical engineers.

In 1893 the manufacture of diphtheria antitoxin and vaccine was undertaken, the company being the first American house to engage in this field. The biologic laboratories. occupying specially constructed and equipped buildings, are located on the firm's own farrr at Glenolden, about eight miles from Philadelphi while the antitoxin laboratories and the vaccine laoratories are under the direction of A. P. Hitcher M.D., and W. F. Elgin, M.D., respectively, with a capble corps of co-workers and assistants. During the last year Dr. Hitchens spent considerable time with Professor Wright in London, studying bacterial vaccines at the so-called opsonic theory, and the firm is now engaged in producing these vaccines, for which there appears to he a very promising future.

The H. K. Mulford Co. was one of the first house to recognize the necessity for standardizing pharmaceutical products contatning alkaloids and other principals, capable of chemical assay, as it was also one of the first to appreciate the value of testing drugs on animals to ascertain their pharmacodynamic value. The department of chemical standardization is located in Philadelphia and that for physiological testing at Glenolden. In these departments are employed fifteen experts, some with degrees from European universities, while others occupy chairs in Philadelphia medical and pharmaceut cal colleges. These experts meet in a club of their own and discuss papers written by members on the subjects in their several special lines, while every alternate month the heads of all the departments meet with the officers of the corporation to confer with each other regarding methods of improvement.

The H. K. Mulford Co. also early realized that, while: pharmacy has a commercial side, the practice of the vocation is a part of the practice of medicine and shoul be carried on by professional methods. Accordingly, when its experts discover new and valuable improvements it donates the results of these researches to the Pharmacopoeial Revision Committee. In this way the discoveries become the property of the profession and pass into general use.

Recognizing that monopoly is unprofessional, and that the free discussion of monopolized products is in possible because, if evidence in their favor is reported the investigator is accused of being purchased by the manufacturer, or, if the report is of such a characte as to cause injury to sales the result is liable to b disastrous to the investigator, the H. K. Mulford Co. is opposed to all monopolies of therapeutic agents. Patents on processes and apparatus for manufacture, such for example, as the patent for manufacturing chloroform, which does not create a monopoly, are approved, likewise are the use of brand-names to distinguish between products. ( Digger Odell Publications © 2007 )

HUMPHREYS HOMEOPATHIC VETERINARY

Homeopathic Medicine Company in New York City in 1853.

Frederick was born in Marcellus, New York on March 11, 1816 to Erastus Humphreys (1785–1848), a physician. Frederick was raised in Auburn, New York where he went to the Auburn Academy. In 1832 he joined his uncle and brother in their clock business. In 1835 he returned home to manage his father's farm. In 1837, at the age of 21, he married Cornelia Palmer (c 1816–1840), and they moved to Chillicothe, Ohio where his Cornelia's father lived. In Chillicothe Frederick entered the Methodist Episcopal ministry. His wife died in 1840 and Fredrick returned to Auburn as an itinerant preacher. On August 1, 1843, Frederick married his second wife, Frances Maria Sperry (1826–1902) of Ludlowville, Tompkins County, New York. They had the following children: Helen Frances Humphreys (1844–?); Frederick Hahnemann Humphreys (1847–1919); Alvah Jay Sperry Humphreys (1851–1884) who was the father of Frederick Erastus Humphreys; and Frank Landon Humphreys (1858–?). He was the personal physician of Theron T. Pond (?-1852), and Humphreys claimed that Pond gave him permission to manufacture Pond's Creams before he died. Humphreys began to manufacture the product under the name "Pond's Extract". Palmer, who took over the Pond's corporation, received an injunction from Humphrey using the name 'Pond's Extract' or manufacturing the cream. Around 1871 the lawsuit of Palmer vs. Humphrey was still pending, when F. W. Hurtt, a banker of New York, bought the alleged rights from Humphrey Homeopathic Medicine Company, and took Palmer into the new partnership, giving him a one-eighth interest in the new corporation.

Frederick Humphreys died in 1900 in Monmouth Beach, New Jersey and he was buried in Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn
FAIRCHILD BROS. & FOSTER, N.Y.

The Fairchild Bros., Benjamin T. and Samuel W., are natives of Stratford Conn., and received their early education in the schools of their native town The elder, Benjamin T. Fairchild. decided, upon leaving school, to adopt pharmacy as a profession. and knowing the advantages which existed in Philadelphia for pharmaceutical training. He spent four years in that city under the preceptor ship of O. S. Hubbell and Alfred B. Taylor, during which time he graduated from the Philadelphia College , Pharmacy. Upon leaving Philadelphia he entered the employ of Caswell, Hazard Co.. New York. and later that of Caswell & Massey. with whom he remained as chemist until 1878, when he embarked with his brother in an Independent business.

The younger brother, Samuel. also obtained his pharmaceutical training under the tutelage of Alfred B. Taylor at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and his business education was obtained through a five years' course in the employ of Caswell, Hazard & Co. Mess. Kesson & Robbins, of New York.

The firm of Fairchild Bros. was established in 1878, and this association of two brothers whose business and social lives had been spent in close relationship and whose qualifications embraced a thorough knowledge, both of the scientific and commercial aspects of pharmacy, had much to contribute to the success of the new firm. After three years of steady progress, Macomb G. Foster, who had been three years with the firm of Mess. Kesson & Robbins, was admitted to the firm, which then became known as Fairchild Bros. & Foster. This change in the firm greatly increased its capital a gave greater scope for the business t parity of its members, and in 1884 the manufacture and introduction of pharmaceutical specialties had assumed such proportions that the firm establish Itself at 82-84 Fulton st. and began making a specialty of the "digestive ferment The success of this class of products well known to all connected with the medical and pharmaceutical profession.

IMPERIAL HAIR REGENERATOR, NY
The Imperial Chemical Manufacturing Co. was located at 135 W. 23rd, in New York City starting in the 1880s. The Imperial Hair Regenerator Co. co-existed at the same address, and probably came after the original. Sometime before the turn of the century, another location was added at 22 W. 23rd. It is likely that the second location was for the second part of the company. An 1895 ad from Metropolitan Magazine indicated that at that time the Imperial Chemical Mfg. Co. was located at 292 Fifth Avenue in New York City, From 1901 through 1912, they were selling an "Imperial Hair remover," and an "Imperial Shampoo," in addition to the Regenerator. By 1908, only the 135 W. 23rd address was listed. The business was still active in 1930.

The trademark of a shield, a crown, and the words "SANS DISSIMULATION" were registered in 1891 (#19830). They said they had been using the symbols since Jan. of 1891. They had also registered a trademark in 1885 (#12,023) which showed the same symbol. (text credit Hair raising stories)
SHARPE & DOHME "SMILING SCULL" POISON

I HAD AROUND 300 POISONS AND THEN GOT OUT OF THEM AND WENT INTO INKS AND BLOBS,LOCAL STUFF...THIS I RECENTLY GOT IN TRADE AND JUST FIGURED I WOULD KEEP IT.THIS ONE IS THE ABM VARIANT AND DATES TOO EARLY 1900'S

The firm was established in 1860 at the corner of Howard and Pratt streets, Baltimore-the site of their present plant. From time to time, as the need for more adequate facilities for manufacturing purposes was felt, additional buildings were erected, and in 1892 the entire plant was practically rebuilt, greatly enlarged and completely equipped with the most improved machinery for the manufacture of pharmaceuticals. Their line is large and varied and embraces in addition to Standard Medicinal fluid, Solid and Powdered Extracts, Solume Gelatin and Sugar-Coated Pills. Granular Effervescent Salts, Soluble Hypodermic Tablets, Compressed Tablets. Tablet titurates, Elixirs, Syrups and Cordials, full line of high grade Pepsins ranging digestive power from 1:2000 to 1:2 d including their well-known S. & D. guaranteed standard just twice the standard adopted by the U. S. P., 1890. S. & D. deserve great credit for having generally introduced Porous Hypodermic Tablets, which are unquestionably much more rapidly soluble and therefore better adapted for subcutaneous use than are Compressed Hypodermic Tablets. Ergotole is another S. & D. product which has on merit alone won general professional recognition. This is a palatable liquid form of Ergot 22 times the strength of the official fluid extract, and which we believe can be used hypodermically without causing abscess. It is especially recommended for internal use because of its pleasant taste, small dose and freedom from nauseating properties.

Mr. Louis Dohme, the president of the company, is well known in pharmaceutical and chemical circles. His genial affability and personal magnetism have won for S. & D. a host of warm friends. He continues to be the active general superintendent of the affairs of the company. Mr. Chas. E. Dohme, the vice-president, a thoroughly practical pharmacist and chemist, has charge of the laboratories in Baltimore, and personally supervises the manufacturing departments.

Mr. Ernest Stoffregen, the secretary and treasurer, a good financier and a just, courteous gentleman personally, manages the business department from their general offices at 41 John street, New York. Dr. Alfred Dohme, who is in charge of the analytical department, has enjoyed exceptional educational advantages both fn America and Europe, and personally assays the crude drugs purchased for manufacturing purposes. Each member of S. & D. is a practical man, thoroughly conversant with the most minute details of his department. The Chicago house is in charge of Chas. E. Matthews & Bro.

S. & D. long ago adopted a business policy which alms to protect both the jobber and the retailer in their mutual relations as well as in their business association with the medical profession. Their creed is purity of drugs, excellence and uniformity of product and courteous treatment of their patrons, and on these lines they have developed their large and constantly growing business.

S.S. STAFFORD INK CO.
Dug these from a small dump behind what was a little school house (now a foundation) had to be 15 of these broken. These 3 were all that was savable but..hey,nice set (SS Staffords Ink)
 

 
 
 
 Samuel S. Stafford 54 Williams St. NY 1856. In 1860 he was at 11 Cedar St. listing himself as an agent for Bryan & Wilcox Writing Fluid. In 1864 he advertised, "Ask your stationer for Conger & Fields Writing Fluid, warranted better than any other ink. S. S. Stafford, chemist, manufacturer 11 Cedar St. New York."

The New York Times ran his obituary Feb. 16, 1895  Dr. Samuel S. Stafford,
"Dr. Samuel Spencer Stafford •died at his home, 13 West Seventy-third Street, yester day afternoon. He was born in Albany Nov. 13, 1825.

He was a graduate of Union College, and also of the Albany Medical College, but he did not practice medicine. When Dr. Stafford received his medical diploma, in 1843, the California gold fever was at its height, and Dr. Stafford went to San Francisco, where he remained until 1854. In that year he returned to New-York, and four years later he engaged in the manufacture of ink. "


The Stafford's ink Co., a New York brand, dates back to 1858, when S. S. Stafford, founder of the house, began to produce chemical writing fluids. The output of this firm has been enormous. Many other houses in several American cities make writing fluids, useful for the day's work

Stafford’s” violet combined writing and copying ink was first placed on the New York market in 1869, though it was in 1858 that Mr. S. S. Stafford, the founder of the house, began the manufacture of inks, which he has continued to do to the present day. His chemical writing fluids are very popular, but he does not make a tanno-gallate of iron ink without “added” color, for the trade.


S. S. STAFFORD, Inc., v. THADEUS DAVIDS INK CO., Inc.
(Circuit Court of Appeals, Second Circuit February 18, 1920.)  1. Patents <g=>328— Claims for bottle stopper or pour-out valid and Infringed. Claims 2 to 7, Inclusive, of the Deppermann patent, No. 1,310,405, for a bottle stopper or pour-out suitable for Ink containers, Including a metal band, the lower part of which holds the perforated 'stopper and bottle mouth firmly together, while the upper portion holds the registering pour-out In rotatable relation to the stopper, A«td valid and infringed. 2. Patents <3=>178— Invention entitled to range of equivalents commensurate with novelty. Where the bottle stopper invented by plaintiff was new, Ingenious, and apt for commercial success, it was entitled, like other Inventions, to a range of equivalents commensurate with the novelty exhibited. 3. Patents <S=>I68(2)— Claims of renewal patent, describing competitor's article, will be strictly construed. Claims allowed on renewal of application for patent once allowed, drawn to read directly on what a competitor had just put out, will be closely scanned and strictly construed, but cannot be disregarded, If they naturally grow out of the specifications. Appeal from the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. Suit by S. S. Stafford, Incorporated, against the Thaddeus Davids Ink Company, Incorporated. From a decree for plaintiff, defendant appeals. Affirmed. Appeal from decree hi equity holding valid, and Infringed by defendant, claims 2 to 7, inclusive, of Deppennann patent, No. 1,310,405, for which application was filed November '£), 1913, renewed February 24, 1919 (within the statutory period), and issued July 15, 1919. The subject of patent Is a "pour-out" or "bottle stopper" especially suitable for ink containers. Both parties are makers and sellers of inks; Deppermann Is an employe of Stafford, and that company put on the market the article made under the patent in suit, about the middle of 1915. As plaintiff is a large maker of Ink, the device promptly became
known—among others—to one Silverthorne, who before that time was working over bottle stoppers. In 1918 Silverthorne agreed to furnish stoppers to defendant; they were put on the market in January, 1019, a patent baring been applied for February 9, 1918, which issued August 20, 1919 (Silverthorue, 1,314,489). Plaintiff procured specimens of the Silverthorne stopper as soon as defendant sold them, and shortly before Deppermann renewed his application. This action was begun promptly on issuance of patent. Deppermann's application, as filed, propounded very numerous claims, which, though amended repeatedly, were all rejected, except what is now No. S.  For other cases see same topic & KEY-NUMUER in all Key-Numbered Digests A Iiidexe*  This was allowed April 2, 1915, and all efforts to get through additional claims failing, the patent was allowed Hay 29, 1017, with this one claim which Is as follows: "In a device of the character described, the combination with a pour-out stopper having a liquid vent and an air vent, the said sropper divided into separate upper and lower members, of an embracing ring adapted to rigidly clamp the lower member to the bottle and hold the upper member loosely whereby the upper member is permitted to rotate on the lower member, an "open-and-shut" indicator comprising an index on the upper member, and "open-and-shut" stations arranged on said securing ring, and means integral with the lower member co-operating with means integral with the securing ring, whereby the relation of the lower member to the ring is determined." Plaintiff (which apparently controlled Deppermann) let the application lapse for nonpayment of fees, and renewed only after the defendant's Silverthorne stopper had been examined. The renewal found more official favor than the original, and the other claims in suit were all offered, presumably drawn, and certainly allowed, after applicant or his counsel had studied Silverthorne. Of them, No. 4 is a good example: "A pour-out for bottles comprising in combination a lower nnd an upper member having corresponding passages and relatively rotatable, and a twopart ring having one part engaging the upper member to hold it from vertical movement while permitting horizontal rotation, and the other part securing the lower member rigid to the bottle and Interlocking means preventing relative rotation of the lower member and said ring."  The second claim is much like it, except that for "two-part ring" is substituted the phrase "annular fastening member," plus a description of what the "member" does. It is found as a fact, that these claims were drawn with an eye to Silverthorne's device, and in the hope of rendering teasier victory in this or a similar suit. The Silverthorne patent contains numerous claims, of which the following (No. 17) gives perhaps the simplest description of what the lower court held to infringe: "An attachment designed to be affixed to a bottle and including a retaining ring, a valve seat fitted within said ring, a valve mounted for rotary movement on said seat, said valve including a base part rotatably mounted within said ring and held to the seat thereby and an upper part extending above said ring, said upper part constituting a finger piece for rotating the valve, said valve provided with a liquid discharging passageway opening therefrom through the finger piece." W. P. Preble, of New York City, for appellant.
Harry E. Knight, of New York City, for appellee. Before WARD, HOUGH, and MANTON, Circuit Judges. HOUGH, Circuit Judge (after stating the facts as above). [1] Viewed in perspective, Deppermann's difficulties in the office are easy of understanding. His specification never changed; what he had achieved was and is, as a visible, mechanical thing, both plain and simple; but he insisted on claims which usually defined the thing in terms (as his solicitor put it) of function, or, as it seems to us, of result. The seventh claim defined the means by which result was reached, and was therefore properly allowed. The patentee's addition to human knowledge is this: Ink is a fluid subject to evaporation and corrosive of metal; it is therefore desirable to keep the bottle, when not in use, tightly stopped, and to pour, through some nonmetallic substance, a thin stream. His device belongs to an old class of "pour-outs," wherein what may be called the bottle "cork" is perforated with an air passage and an ink passage,which register with similar pasages in a relatively rotatable spout; when in register, ink will flow out on proper tipping; when out of register, the bottle is tight. There is another commercially desirable thing which is effected by this device. Ink makers wish to sell as many ink bottles as possible ; therefore, if a "pour-out" is put on the full bottle, which cannot be replaced, if removed, the "non-refillable" bottle is produced. This was old, through the device of not inserting the stopper into the bottle neck, but of binding it to the bottle top by a tight metal band external to and uniting stopper and bottle top. Deppermann's "embracing ring," "annular fastening member," or "two-part ring" is a metal band, of which the lower part holds firmly together the perforated stopper and the bottle mouth, while the upper portion—of reduced diameter—holds the registering "pour-out" in loose, and therefore rotatable, relation to the firmly fixed stopper. This "embracing ring" was a new idea; it made the stopper embody a new combination, and we agree with, the court below that it displays patentable invention. Silverthorne arrives at confessedly the same result, by securing to a "pour-out," or spout (old, as is Deppermann's), rotation relative to the stopper, by a "retaining ring" which fits loosely over the "pourout" base. But this device, as just indicated, and claimed in the quotation (supra) from Silverthorne's patent, will not fasten to a bottle by anything described; but (says the specification) it may be "fastened thereto by any conventional ferrule fastening device," and accordingly, in the actual thing complained of, it is secured to the ink bottle by a metal band, which grips both bottle mouth and "retaining ring" and makes all tight whenever the spout is out of register. Whether this identity of result is reached in the same way depends on finding first the inventive thought that vitalizes the patent, next asking whether the means of applying that thought have been appropriately defined in the claim, and then inquiring whether defendant's means are within whatever range of equivalents patentee is entitled to. [2] Deppermann's one inventive thought was to put into a structure, unitary when affixed to a bottle, the stopper, registering spout, and embracing ring; he did appropriately define that thought in claim 7, and did it long before Silverthorne; and he thereby made something new, ingenious, and apt for commercial success. Such an invention, like all others, is entitled to a range of equivalents commensurate with the novelty exhibited; and here the novelty is not great, but considerable. Defendant has sold a device which only transfers the loose spout retention element of Deppermann from his integral extension of the outside ring to a separate ring, which fits inside of the outer ring defendant actually uses. It has split one of Deppermann's elements in two; but the two parts are and must be joined in work, and when so joined do the same thing in the same way as does Deppermann's. It has been easier to describe what it complained of in terms of Silverthorne's patent; but that is mere convenience. We are concerned only with what defendant has sold; the later patent does not vary the legal problem. We therefore agree with the court below that infringement exists as to the seventh claim. [3] As for the rest the plain effort of plaintiff to "lick into shape" some new claims that would read directly on what a competitor had just put out, is not attractive, and justly leads any court to scan closely claims so composed. Lyon, etc., Co. v. Hartford (D. C.) 247 Fed. 524. affirmed 250 Fed. 1021, 162 C. C. A. 664. Claims 2 to 6 of this patent are to be read in the light of the facts, and strictly construed; but the procedure was within the letter of the statute, and they cannot be cast out, if they do naturally grow out of the specification. We think they do, if "two-part ring" and annular "fastening member" be taken to mean no more than the "embracing ring" of claim 7. Nevertheless infringement remains, because what defendant does is, even within a narrow range, the plain equivalent of the one vitalizing element bf Deppermann's invention.   Decree affirmed, with costs.

 
DR. VAN WERT'S BALSAM ~ WATERTOWN,N.Y.

Misbranding of Dr. Van Wert's Balsam for the Lungs." U. S. v. Samual Felt (Van Wert Chemical Co.Watertown,NY).

On March 19. 1915, the United States attorney for the Northern District of New York. acting upon a report by the Secretary of Agriculture, filed in the District Court of the United States for said district an information against Samuel Felt. trading under the firm name of Van Wert Chemical Co. Watertmvn, N. Y., alleging shipment by said defendant, in violation of the Food and Drug: Act, as amended. on or about December 20. 1912, from the State of New York into the State of Massachusetts, of a quantity of Dr. Van Wert’s Balsam for the Lungs " which was misbranded. The product was labeled(On carton) Dr.Wert's Balsam for the Lungs The Great No. 2858. Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act, June 30, ’06 Chioroform 4 min. to oz. Morphine 6 gr. to oz. Cure Price 25 cts. Manufactured by the Van Wert Chemical (30. Watertown, N. Y. Registered in U. S. Patent Office in 1885 By Van Wert Chemical Co. For Asthma Bronchitis Croup & Whooping Cough. The Success of This Medicine Has Induced Many Imitators to Copy the Word Balsam Be Sure You Ask For Dr. Van Wert's And Take No Other Keep in a Cool Place Shake Well Before Using. Van Wert Chemical Co. For Consumption Coughs & Colds. (On bottle) Dr. Van Wert's Balsam for Conmmption, Coughs. Colds, Hoarseness, Croup, Whooping Cough, Asthma, Bronchril and all diseases of the Throat and Lungs. Directions. Keep bottle tightly corked and shake well before using. Dose. Ten or twelve drops to be taken as often as the tickling in the throat, which precedes a cough, is felt. In this way the affected membranes are treated to the continuous influence of the Balsam. if preferred, one teaspoonful may be taken after each meal, and upon retiring at night. For a child of ten years and under, five drops should he given on the occasion of every paroxysm of coughing. For infants, 2 drops in spoonful of water every hour. Price, 25 cents. Prepared only by Van Wert Chemical Co.Watertown, N. Y. Registered in United States Patent Office" (Blown in bottle) Dr. Van Wert's Balsam Van Wert Chemical Co.Watertown,

G.W.MERCHANTS GARGLING OIL ~ LOCKPORT, N.Y.

 
Large & Smaller sizes of G.W.Merchants Gargling Oil, Lockport N.Y.
 
The Merchant’s Gargling Oil Company of Lockport, New York was founded by Dr. George W. Merchant, a druggist, in 1833, and initially sold to drivers of horses and mules alongside the Erie Canal. Dr Merchant started out in “Lower Town” and moved to “Upper Town” in 1836. Dr. Merchant shrewdly marketed with the slogan “Good for Man and Beast”. By the end of the 19th century the product was sold worldwide and company was one of Lockport’s main industries. George W. Merchant sold the business to M.H. Tucker around 1855. John Hodge joined the company as a teenager, and was elected Secretary when M.H. Tucker & Company was incorporated in 1858. Hodge married one of Tucker’s daughters and gained control of the company in 1865 when Tucker died. Overall, Merchant’s Gargling Oil lasted almost 100 years, going out of business in 1928 when the factory finally burned down. The company ownership changed hands at least 3 or 4 times in the 19th century.

 

Merchant’s Gargling Oil is a diffusible stimulant and carminative. It can be taken internally when such a remedy is indicated, and is a good substitute for pain killers, cordials and anodynes. For Cramps or Spasms of the Stomach, Colic, Asthma, or Internal Pain, the dose may be from fifteen to twenty drops, on sugar, or mixed with syrup in any convenient form, and repeated at intervals of three to six hours.

Merchant’s Gargling Oil is the Standard Liniment of the United States. Established 1833. Large size, $1; medium, 50c.; small, 25c.; small size for family use, 25c.

Manufactured at Lockport, N. Y., by M. G. O. Co., and sold by all druggists.

 

 Merchant’s Gargling Oil (no, the horse or person did not have to gargle it) could trace its pedigree to 1833 Philadelphia, though it was manufactured in Lockport, New York. The first incarnation of the liniment was intended to cure almost any illness that could befall a domestic animal. The form intended for human use was not introduced until 1875. Four years earlier Merchant’s Vegetable Worm Tablets had made their appearance. Merchant’s Gargling Oil was then made in two versions, one for animals and one for people. The ointment for animal ailments was intended for surface wounds and skin ailments common to horses, cattle, sheep and poultry. A topical ointment was also made for human skin problems. Neither product was intended for internal use, despite the product name of gargling oil.

 

 

 
Dr TOBIAS VENETIAN HORSE LINIMENT ~ D&R SPECIAL FLASK

Dr TOBIAS VENETIAN HORSE LINIMENT IN 8+ INCH SIZE, A NICE PINT FLASK THAT WAS A GIFT TO ME AT A LOCAL SHOW BY RICK CIRALLI, POSTED THE MEANING I FOUND BELOW.DATES LATE 1800S
 
 
 
DISTILLER'S AND RECTIFIER'S PERMIT  AUTHORIZED ACTIVITIES. (a) The holder of a distiller's and rectifier's permit may:

(1) manufacture distilled spirits;

(2) rectify, purify, and refine distilled spirits and wines;

(3) mix wines, distilled spirits, or other liquors;

(4) bottle, label, and package the permit holder's finished products;

(5) sell the finished products in this state to holders of wholesaler's permits and to qualified persons outside the state;

(6) purchase distilled spirits, to be used only for manufacturing or rectification purposes, from holders of nonresident seller's permits or distiller's and rectifier's permits;

(7) dispense free distilled spirits for consumption on the permitted premises

(8) if located in a wet area, sell distilled spirits to ultimate consumers
 
 
Dr TOBIAS VENETIAN HORSE LINIMENT
 
A GOOD, CHEAP. AND RELIABLE LINIMENT Such an article is Dr. Tobias' Venetian Horse Liniment. Pint Bottles at One Dollar. For Lameness, Cuts, Galls. Colic, Sprains, etc., warranted better than any other. It is used by all the Seat horsemen on Long Island courses. It will not cure Spavin, as there is no Liniment in existence that will What it is stated to cure it positively does
No owner of horses will be without it after trying owe bottle. One dose revives and often saves the life of an over-heated or driven horse For Colic and Belly-ache it has never failed. Just as sure as the sun rises, just so sure is this valuable Liniment to be the Horse Embrocation of the day.
Use it one and all. Sold by the Druggists and Store keepers throughout the United States. Depot, la Park Place, New York. 288
 
VINCENT,HATHAWAY & CO. BOSTON GINGER ALE

ROUND BOTTOM "VINCENT,HATHAWAY & CO. BOSTON ~ GINGER ALE"  THE PURPOSE OF THE ROUND BOTTOM WAS TO KEEP BOTTLE ON SIDE THEREFORE KEEPING CORK WET AND SWELLED NOT ALLOWING THE CARBONATED BEVERAGE TO ESCAPE. THERE WAS A WOODEN BLOCK THAT THIS WOULD HAVE SAT IN WHEN IN USE TO KEEP IT UPRIGHT.
 
 
SCHENCK'S SEAWEED TONIC AND PULMONIC

SCHENCKS ~ 1865

The proprietor of these medicines conscientiously offers them to the public as the only safe, reliable and certain remedies for Pulmonary Consumption. He recommends them with equal confidence as almost a specific for those morbid conditions of the body, which, if neglected, are apt to terminate in dangerous or fatal diseases of the lungs. Liver Complaint and Dyspepsia are generally regarded as forerunners of Consumption, and when these diseases manifest themselves, they require the most prompt attention.

The value of the Pulmonic Syrup has been tested in innumerable cases. My personal experience gives me the best assurance of the efficacy of this medicine. Many years and I was given up by physicians as one who was in the last stage of consumption, and I was taken from my home in Philadelphia to my friends in Moorestown, N.J., to die. I was wasted away to a mere skeleton. I was confined to my bed, and my physician (who had attended my father's family before my time) declared that I could not live a week. Then, like a drowning man catching at straws, I heard of and obtained this preparations of roots and herbs, which, to the astonishment of every spectator, soon made a perfect cure. It seemed to me that I could feel it penetrating my whole system. It seen ripened the matter in my lungs, and I would spit up more than a pint of offensive yellow matter every morning for more than a week. As soon as this expectoration began to subside, my cough, fever, pain and night-sweats all began to leave me, and my appetite became so great that it was with difficulty that I kept from eating too much. I soon recovered my strength, and have been increasing in flesh ever since. It astonished all who know me, and all believed I was too far gone to make my recovery possible. Many people who know me then are now living, and occupy places of honor and trust in New-Jersey and Philadelphia, who can easily satisfy the most incredulous relative to the truth of these statements. My disease was hereditary; my father, mother, brothers and sisters all died of consumption, and I alone am left.

Now I enjoy the best health, and have for years weighed more than two hundred and ten pounds. Immediately after my recovery I removed to Flemington, N.J., and for several years made the Pulmonic Syrup and gave it to the afflicted. It made such wonderful cures that the physician of the place were astonished at its effects, and advised me to turn my attention to the science of medicine, and especially to the study of this disease. In fact, I was driven to it by the application of great numbers of people who came or sent to me from all parts of the country, calling on me to cure them, after all other human assistance was unavailable.

Since my recovery the Pulmonic Syrup has been extensively used for more than twenty-five years; and so well has it ensured this long probation that its reputation and popularity have constantly increased.

Although it is an undeniable fact that some of the worst cases of consumption may and have been cured by this syrup alone, yet I early became aware that the cure may be facilitated, in many instances, by the use of two other medicines, which are found to be most admirably adapted to this purpose. These medicines are the Seaweed Tonic and Mandrake Pills. In order to understand how these medicines effect the cures which are ascribed to their agency, it is necessary, to have some acquaintance with the peculiarities of the disease.

Pulmonary Consumption (phthisis pulmonalis) is characterized by emaciation, debility, cough, hectic fever and purulent expectoration. This disease has always been the greatest scourge of the human race, and it has destroyed more lives than famine, sword and pestilence. An English writer, some years ago, computed that out of a population of eleven millions in the island of Great Britain, fifty-five thousand annually die of consumption. The same fatality attends the disease in this climate. One principal cause of the great
mortality which attends Pulmonary Consumption is, the false theory that it is incurable. This mischievous error causes many consumptive patients to despair as soon as the nature of their affliction becomes manifest; and when they are hopeless of a cure, they resign themselves to what they suppose to be inevitable fate, and die without making may effort prolong their lives. "Our doubts are traitors," says Shakespeare. Consumptives are often victimize by a for gone conclusion that their cases are beyond the reach or medicine.

Pulmonary consumption is in most cases complicated with disorders of the liver and stomach. "Before the attack of this disease," says a French physician, "a change takes place in the condition of the blood, which becomes degraded in quality and endowed with a lower degree of vitality." This change is caused by the imperfect action of the liver, for one of the offices of that organ is to strain
and purify the blood. Schenck's Mandrake Pills act on the liver more promptly and effectually than any other medicine. Hence they are often prescribed by me on the first stage of consumption, and in many other cases, when the torpid or diseased condition of the liver requires the use of this unrivaled pugative. Concerning the use of these pills, more will be said hereafter; in the present connection, it may be observed that their operation corrects that morbid condition of the blood which always precedes an attack of consumption, and is, therefore, presumed to be one of the principal causes of the attack.

In the next place, it is found that dyspepsia or a languid digestion is often a forerunner of consumption, and in numerous instances it accompanies the disease through all its stages. Dyspepsia is regarded by many medical writers as one of the prominent causes of consumption, and they have good reasons for this supposition, for the absence of nutrition in the blood leads to the formation of tubercles, and dyspeptic diseases deprive the blood of its nutritive properties.

While Dyspepsia is present, it is almost or quite impossible for Consumption to be cured. For indigestion produces a general debility of the system, and this state of debility is most unfavorable to the reestablishment of the patient's health; for how can ulcerous cavities in the lungs be healed when the stomach has no power of digestion, and the system is, therefore, too weak to produce that reaction which is necessary for a cure? Nourishing food, alter all, is the material which must bring about this great change. My medicines only assist Nature to overpower the disease, and to produce healthy secretions instead of the morbid matter which vitiates the quality of the blood. From these considerations it will appear that tonic or strengthening medicines are required in the treatment of Consumption, and especially such medicines as have an invigorating effect on the digestive organs. SCHENCK'S SEAWEED TONIC is compounded with particular reference to these objects, and it was first consigned to be used in consumptive cases as an auxiliary to the Pulmonic Syrup. It is applicable, however, to all cases of dyspepsia, and it may be proved to demonstration that it is the only medicine which will cure that disease. Many eminent physicians have doubted whether Dyspepsia can be cured by drugs; and the drugs which are generally employed for that purpose, though they may seem occasionally
to afford temporary relief, finally produce an aggravation of the symptoms. The Seaweed Tonic, in its nature, is totally different from such drugs. It contains no corrosive minerals or acids; in fact, it is so far from having any action hostile to the animal economy, that it assists the regular operations of nature and supplies her deficiencies. This Tonic in its nature so much resembles the gastric juice that it is almost identical with that fluid. The gastric juice, as all physiologists know, is the natural solvent which, in a healthy condition of the body, causes the food to be digested, and when this juice is not secreted in sufficient quantities, indigestion, with all its distressing symptoms, follows. The Seaweed Tonic performs the duty of the gastric juice when the latter is deficient. It has, likewise, all the invigorating properties of iodide of potassium, iodide of iron and iodine -- remedies which are often prescribed by physicians to strengthen the constitutions of consumptive patients. From what has been said, it may judged that Schenck's Seaweed Tonic is a most important remedy in the treatment of Pulmonary disease, and experience proves this to be the fact. One of the good effects of this Tonic is to enable the patient to digest such a diet as consumptive persons require. Physicians now admit that a highly nutritious diet is most proper for such persons. Indeed, the food cannot be too nourishing for consumptives if it can be made digestible. You may [???]ed such a patient with articles rich and nutritive enough to produce gout in certain conditions of the system, but if the gastric powers of the patient are [???]te those articles -- in other word, if he is able to digest them -- his lungs being thereby invigorated will begin to exercise their functions in a normal and healthy manner, and if a cure is possible, it must soon be effected.

The Seaweed Tonic, by improving the power of the stomach and strengthening the whole system, prepares the dyspeptic and enfeebled patient for the use of the Pulmonic Syrup. The operation of the latter is to increase the vital energies, to ripen the ulcers, and to expel all the morbid matter from the system. But as consumption is often coupled with dyspepsia or liver complaint, and as it frequently originates in these disorders, it is proper in some cases to begin with the use of the Tonic and Pills, or to use them simultaneously with the Syrup.

Schenck's Mandrake Pills relax the secretions and unlock the gall-bladder quite as well as a dose of blue mass, and perhaps better, and these Pills are warranted not to contain a particle of calomel. Some physicians have positively asserted that calomel or mercury must enter into the composition of these Pills, for, according to their theory, nothing but calomel could act on the liver, as these Pills certainly do. But to prove the doctors are mistaken, it is merely necessary to notice the fact that Schenck's Mandrake Pills never produce salivation, whether they be used in large or small doses. Thousands are, used weekly with the happiest effects. With calomel or blue pill the case is different. Large doses of this poison may sometimes act as a purgative, and so pass off without any visible mischief; but small doses will salivate, and this is the great mischief which the "regular faculty" have to contend with. One box of these Pills, valued at 25 cents, will prove the efficacy of the medicine. No matter bow costive or how bilious the system may be, the habit of body is immediately corrected and regulated by these Pills, and the organs brought to a healthy and natural activity. The Mandrake Pills are likewise an infallible remedy for sick headache and piles. In many cases they have brought away worms from grown persons who had long suffered with many unpleasant symptoms, without suspecting the real cause of their ailments. 

 

 

N.Y. STONEWARE CO.   FORT EDWARD N.Y  ~    KNAPPS ROOT BEER EXTRACT

I DUG THIS DECORATED 1 GALLON N.Y. STONEWARE JUG OUT BEHIND MY HOUSE IN THE BACKGROUNDS UNDER THE CUSTOM UMBRELLAS AND PATIO FURNITURE ABOUT AN 1/8 MILE IN, VERY COOL FIND. 

 

NICE KNAPP ROOT BEER EXTRACT I DUG RECENTLY, COOL BOTTLE. 

 

 

 N.Y. STONEWARE CO. FORT EDWARD N.Y.

The manufacture of stoneware was a major industry in Fort Edward beginning in 1858. Otto Lewis was the first potter to locate here with many firms being formed soon after. George Satterlee opened the Fort Edward Pottery Co. in 1859. Michael Mory joined the firm in 1861 to form Satterlee and Mory. J. A. & C. W. Underwood ran a pottery firm, which opened in 1865 and closed in 1867. Haxstun, Ottman & Co. ran it from 1867 to 1872 on the site of the former Underwood Pottery. In 1872, Haxstun withdrew from Ottman and the firm became known as Ottman Brothers.

In 1875, a pottery opened on the corner of Broadway and Argyle Street under the ownership of Haxstun and Company. Later it was purchased by the Tilford Brothers, who were succeeded by George S. Guy. The Fort Edward Stoneware Association was formed in February of 1883 by a group of pottery manufacturers. In 1892, the Hilfinger Brothers purchased the Guy Pottery, which was to remain in operation until 1941. Unlike the former stoneware manufactures, the Hilfinger produced earthenware pottery from native clay

Fort Edward stoneware was produced by several local firms from 1858 until the 1940s. The large glazed crocks, jugs and other vessels often featuring cobalt decoration and a brown glazed interior are highly sought after collector's items today 

 

CAW'S INK CO. ~  NEW YORK

 

Early in 1886, Brown joined the Fountain Ink Company of 62 Cliff Street, New York as a trustee. Here he fell in love with their crow-colored ink and devised the name "Caws." By October Fountain Ink suddenly went broke and Brown bought the assets in a bankruptcy sale. He changed the name to "Caw's Ink andPen Company", and named his wife its President.  Besides ink, he quickly started manufacturing and advertising the Dashaway pen that he and David W. Beaumel patented in November, 1886. Brown also opened a store at 233 Broadway where he employed Aunt Camille to handle the retail business. All was going well, but for one thing. Brown's Dashaway was nearly identical To the pen Wirt patented on Feb 3, 1885, nearly two years before. Wirt, a lawyer before entering the pen industry, lost no time in filing suit against Brown for patent infringement. The boastful Brown biography claims that Wirt and Waterman copied his designs, though the patent dates speak for themselves. The Wirt-Brown trial of Feb 1887 proved to be interesting. Exhibit A was  Wirt’s overfeed pen; Exhibit B, C, and D were Brown's pens, the last being the one purchased as this history began. Wirt testified that he bought identical pens from the store himself and that Quesnel, the woman at the register, refused him a receipt. Brown arrived an hour late for his testimony and, when on the stand, conveniently had difficulty remembering incriminating dates on which he made his pens. Brown even denied at first that his pens used capillary attraction to insure a constant ink flow. After several of Wirt's expert witnesses, including Lewis Waterman, testified that Brown's pen worked the same as Wirt's, Brown's counsel attacked Wirt's patent. They claimed that Wirt's design was not original and should not have received a patent in the first place. Ironically, this would also mean that Brown’s nearly identical design shouldn't have received a patent. Brown's lawyers presented dozens of earlier American and English patents covering anything that looked like Wirt's pen. They even tried to sneak in a few irrelevant patents dated after Wirt's. The only patent of any significance was Marvin C. Stone's 1882 feed patent. Wirt's design differed only in that his feed protruded into the ink reservoir where Stone's stopped at the section. Later, Wirt would acquire the rights to the Stone patent and imprint that date on his pens, so that his title was clear.  In the end, Judge Benedict ruled in Wirt's favor, saying "The pens made by the defendant are identical in principle with the pens made by the plaintiff. The Complainant is therefore entitled to a decree and an injunction."  This defeat did little to slow Brown. He quickly created some new feed designs and published even more aggressive advertising. Some of Caw’s first pens made were stylographics nearlyidentical to the MacKinnon. Lapham & Bogart Company, makers of “The Rival” pen produced them under contract and was sued, in turn, by Wirt for their trouble.  Besides marketing heavily in America, Brown was working hard to find markets in England and France. He won a first place medal at the 1889 World's Fair in Paris for his pens and stylographics where Marie Francoise and Aunt Camille’s French served him well. He also managed to contract with the Maruzen Import Company of Tokyo making the Caw's Stylographic pen one of the first fountain pens imported into Japan.  While Wirt advertised his pens with Mark Twain's endorsement, Brown courted presidents. Both ex-President Benjamin Harrison and President Grover Cleveland used and endorsed the Caw's Dashaway #130, a huge pen whose nib resembles a garden tool more than a writing implement. Cleveland Said, "I find Caw's Dashaway Fountain Pen very valuable as a signature pen." Harrison wrote, "The second Dashaway Fountain Pen received and suits me. The first one I gave to Mrs. Harrison, and she is using it with great satisfaction." No other pen in history has been publicly endorsed by two US presidents.  By the 1890's scores of pen makers were entering the industry, but little had changed in the way of design. Most of these pens were filled with an eyedropper and all suffered from leaks and caused ink stains. It was expected, and people joked about it. In 1893, the New York Times published a little joke that read "I would never trust him, he is as treacherous as a fountain pen." Another common joke was "No, not all gushing letters are written with a fountain pen." Brown sought to change this. In 1895 Francis Brown patented a spiral-cam safety pen(click for images and more information). Much as he had done with the Fountain Ink Company a decade before, he bought up the assets of the failed Horton Pen Company of New Haven, Connecticut and commenced production of the Caw’s Safety Pen in 1896. Also in that year he worked with Morris W. Moore on improvements to Moore’s 1893 safety pen design. Later the Waterman Company acquired these patents (see the Waterman History, Part III, in March Stylophiles) to become the most successful safety pen of the 20th Century. Brown received almost no money from Waterman for his patent rights but was paid in job lots of unmarked Waterman pens that he could imprint and sell both in the United States and in Europe. Francis Brown’s pens were always at least interesting and often innovative. One pen in the Caw’s catalogue and one of which Brown was most proud, was called “The Limit" The owner could convert it from a safety to a normal eyedropper fountain pen. Another interesting Caw's pen is “The Easy" which was Caw’s entry into the “jointless” pen fad of the turn of the last century. “The Easy” is identical in principle to that of the slightly later Jay G. Rider pen. It fills with an eyedropper, but the pen has no section. The barrel is one piece. The nib and feed are pulled out to fill the barrel. Brown began selling more and more pens in Europe as the US market grew more Competitive and his share of the U.S. market dwindled. When found at all today, his contract pens from Waterman often come from France and the Low Countries. The chaos of World War I destroyed the last remaining markets for his fountain pens. Frank Brown left pen manufacture for good, making a living as an insurance salesman until his death on Feb 1,39

 

MID 1800'S BEERS & WHISKEY'S

 

 THESE ARE FROM THE 1860S AND ARE SOME I DUG AT THE AGE OF 14 IN UPSTATE NY,I HAVE QUITE A FEW AND GRAB MORE WHEN I CAN. I THINK THEY HAVE ALOT OF CLASS. EACH ONE IS DIFFERENT EVEN IN THE SAME VARIANT LINES

Thomas McMullen & Co., against the decision of the collector of customs at New York, X. Y., as to the rate and amount of duties chargeable on certain merchandise, imported per the vessels and entered on the dates specified in the schedule. Opinion by Somerville, General Appraiser.

The merchandise covered by the protests consists of ale bottles of common colored glass, holding not more than one pint and bearing the inscription "Thos. McMullen & Co.'s White Label." This inscription is shown by the testimony to be produced by the impulsion of sand, through machine power, against the surface of the bottles, the process being known as sand blasting. This process was held by the Board in re Witteman (G. A. 4054) to be different from the processes of etching, engraving, and cutting. The testimony in this case satisfactorily sustains that finding of fact.

These bottles were classified and assessed for duty by the collector at the rate of 11 cents per pound, under paragraph 99 of the tariff act of 1897, as "plain green or colored, molded or pressed, * * * glass bottles, * * * holding not more than one pint and not less than one-fourth of a pint." They are claimed by the importers to be subject to duty at 45 per cent ad valorem, under paragraph 112, as manufactures of glass, or under paragraph 100, which, so far as it pertains to the question under consideration, reads as follows:

100. Glass bottles, decanters, or other vessels or articles of glass, cut, engraved, painted, colored, stained, silvered, gilded, etched, frosted, printed in any manner or otherwise ornamented, decorated, or ground (except snch grinding as is necessary for fitting stoppers), * * * sixty per centum ad valorem.  December 22, 1899.

 

 

SOME EARLY KNAPP'S ROOT BEER ADS

BUG~I~CIDE  POISON

OLIVE AMBER EARLY PART OF THE 1900'S BUG BOTTLE, A NEAT DISPLAY

This has now become almost as well an established remedy as the arsenites. It is cheap, simple and effectual. It is made of soap, kerosenft oil and water—three ingredients that the farmer always has at his command. The formula is, to two quarts of water add one quart of soft soap or one fourth pound of hard soap, and heat the whole to boiling. When the soap is dissolved take from the fire, add a pint of kerosene and agitate so thoroughly and rapidly with a force pump without the nozzle, that the mixture will foam like milk when filling a dairyman's pail on a summer's evening. It should be churned in this way until the soap and oil become permanently mixed; that is. until the oil will not rise or appear on standing or when diluted. This will take at least three minutes rapid work. Stirring with a stick or spoon, or slow pumping will not emulsify the soap and oil, though an egg beater may be used for a very small quantity. The emulsion as first made is too strong and will injure the plants unless diluted before applying. The soft soap emulsion should have as much water added as there is emulsion, and the hard soap emulsion twice its bulk of water added and well stirred. They are now ready to be applied with a spray pump. The dilute emulsion should be stirred frequently in applying.

The above is the regular formula. The emulsion can be made in larger quantities in the same proportion, but if made in quantities larger than six or eight times the regular formula, it will be difficult to make a stable emulsion with a small hand force pump. This has been one of the discouraging features in the uses of kerosene emulsion. It now seems evident that we can overcome that difficulty in a large measure. The method is to use the soft soap formula, as given above, leaving out the water. The soft soap is heated until it becomes liquid and then, without water, add half as much oil as there has been soap used, emulsifying according to the directions already given. The emulsion made in this way is as perfect as when made with water and is so concentrated that it is one-third oil, or in other words, the same emulsion in this way occupies less than one-half the space that it would when made by the first formula given. An emulsion made in this way without water will need to be diluted with four times its own bulk of water before using.

It was certainly owing to the improper emulsifying that led to the woolcoming off his sheep as reported by Mr. Beck in the Michigan Farmer, Dec. 9. and in not recommending its use as long as the other dips could be used.

There is little question but that it will take the wool off if there is free oil on the surface, but if thoroughly emulsified and properly prepared there is no better and more effectual sheep dip used and it is much cheaper than the others too. (Mr. Sherwood has found this effectual on sheep scab.)

For lice on stock and hogs it is also an excellent treatment. Take a pail of the diluted emulsion and a scrub brush and in a very little while a stable full of live stock can have their coats thoroughly saturated. A thorough scrubbing of all the parts in this way will effectually free the stock of lice and produce a remarkably sleek, glossy coat and hide. Lousy hogs may be cornered in the pen and sprayed if thought best. As a last resort the emulsion may be used in ridding a badly infested chicken house of lice or mites.

For the little plant lice that throng so many of our plants and trees so early in the season, and the most of the plant bugs, about the only remedy that we have is the emulsion. It is also one of our best specifics for scales lice which we find attached to the bark of trees in scale-like manner, as the little apple tree bark louse. The oil in the emulsion will penetrate many of these scales and so reach the occupant inside. The emulsion is always more effectual if thrown with force on an insect as in a spray and should be used in this way always, if possible

DANA'S SARSAPARILLA & BARLOWS BAKING BOTTLE

DANA'S SARSAPARILLA,NOT RARE BUT ALWAYS FUN TO DIG, ON RIGHT IS A CLASSIC "BUY BARLOW'S BIG BOTTLES BEFORE BAKING"

 Dana's Sarsaparilla, Kilgore and Wilson, Belfast, 1888 

A year after this trademark was registered, G.C. Kilgore and others organized the Dana Sarsaparilla Company. By 1891 they had built a five-floor factory for $17,000, each floor measuring 26,600 square feet; and were employing 35 people. It was said that Dana's Sarsaparilla "wrought many wonderful cures."

CASES OF INSANITY From the Effects of "LA GRIPPE" Arc Alarmingly Prevalent. S U I C I D E S From the SAME CAUSE Are announced in every paper. Would you bo rid of the awful effect* of La Grippe? There is BUT ONE SURE REMEDY that NEVER FAILS, VIZ. Dana's  Sarsaparilla. We Guarantee to CUBE you or REFUND your money. COULD WE DO MORE? Isn't it worth a trial?

"Beside me, as I write, lie issues of some twenty different 'religious' weeklies, the advertising columns of which are a positive stench in the nostrils of decent, self-respecting people. Let the Woman's Christian Temperance Union officers counsel its members who subscribe for these papers to compel their publishers to omit these advertisements, and if they refuse, let these people discontinue their patronage of the paper. Such measures would very quickly shut out from publicity the majority of these baneful patent medicines. There is vital, important work here for the Woman's Christian Temperance Union—work in a cause which is aiming with far greater danger at the very heart of American homes than the cracking of a bottle of champagne over the hull of a newly launched craft!"  ~  "Far better, ladies, that the contents of a bottle of champagne should go into the water, where it will do no one any harm, than that the contents of a bottle of 'patent medicine,' with 40 per cent of alcohol in it, by volume, should be allowed to go into the system of a child and strike at his very soul, planting the seed of a future drunkard "  In regard to the alcoholic feature of these nostrums he prints the table of percentages given by the Massachusetts State Board

Analyst in Public Document No. 34, as follows:     Per cent of alcohol (by volume).

Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 20.6  Paine's Celery Compound 21.  Dr. Williams' Vegetable Jaundice Bitters 18.5  Whiskol, "a non-intoxicating stimulant" 28.2  Colden's Liquid Beef Tonic, "recommended for treat-
ment of alcoholic habit" 26.5   Ayer's Sarsaparilla 26.2  Thayer's Compound Extract of Sarsaparilla 21.5  Hood's Sarsaparilla 18.8  Allen's Sarsaparilla 13.5  Dana's Sarsaparilla 13.5  Brown's Sarsaparilla 13.5  Peruna 28.5  Vinol, Wine of Cod-Liver Oil 18.8  Dr. Peters' Kuriko 14.  Carter's Physical Extract 22.  Hooker's Wigwam Tonic 20.7  Hoofland's German Tonic 29.3  Howe's Arabian Tonic, "not a rum drink" 13.2  Jackson's Golden Seal Tonic 19.6  Mensman's Peptonized Beef Tonic 16.5  Parker's Tonic, "purely vegetable" 41.6  Schenck's Seaweed Tonic, "entirely harmless" 19.5  Baxter's Mandrake Bitters 16.5  Boker's Stomach Bitters 42.6  Burdock's Blood Bitters 25.2  Greene's Nervura 17.2  Hartshorn Bitters 22.2  Hoofland's German Bitters, "entirely vegetable" 25.6  Hop Bitters 12.  Hostetter's Stomach Bitters 44.3  Kaufman's Sulphur Bitters, "contains no alcohol" (as a
matter of fact it contains 20.5 per cent of alcohol  and no sulphur) 20.5  Pritana 22.  Richardson's Concentrated Sherry Wine Bitters 47.5  Warner's Safe Tonic Bitters 35.7  Warren's Bilious Bitters 21.5   Faith Whitcomb's Nerve Bitters 20.3

We are informed that the proprietor of "Doctor Pierce's Favorite Prescription" has already commenced suit against the Ladies' Home Journal for the particular mention made of this alcoholic preparation. Mr. Bok is entitled to the sincere thanks and appreciation of the entire medical profession, who, while recognizing the evil he has so emphatically pointed out, are in the very nature of things unable to successfully combat it.

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VAPO~CRESOLINE

MY COLLECTION OF VAPO~CRESOLINE STUFF, THE AQUA BOTTLE WITH NO BUMPS IS FROM 1880S AND VERY RARE.

POISONING BY VAPOCRESOLENE.

BY S. S. ADAMS, M.D.                           Washington, D. C.,

These cases are reported because vapo-cresolene is to be found in a great many houses in which there is a child with a cough. It is sometimes introduced and recommended by the physician. I have seen two cases of carbolic acid poisoning directly attributable to the inhalation of the fumes from a vapocresolene lamp. In one case I was called to see a patient who was said to be dying and the family and physician did not know what was the matter. I found the child, aged one year, in coma, and in a cold, clammy sweat. There was marked pulmonary edema. When I asked what had been done with carbolic acid, I was told that the child had been shut up for twenty-four hours in a small room inhaling the fumes from a vapo-cresolene lamp. I asked the mother: " How long has this child been passing black urine?" and she said it had passed black urine, but had passed no urine for twenty-four hours. The child was taken out in the open air, given water to drink and it recovered.

I was called to see an infant aged six months dying, it was said, from pneumonia. The child had stridulous respiration, mucous rales over both lungs, a cold, clammy sweat, and dilated pupils. The temperature was only a little over one hundred degrees in the rectum, and had been even lower. As I went out of the room I saw a vapo-cresolene lamp burning. Somebody had recommended using the vapo-cresolene lamp and the mother had put it beside the crib at bed-time. At twelve o'clock the child refused its food. At four o'clock the mother was awakened by a peculiar noise the child was making, and it was after this that I was called. This patient did not pass smoky urine. The child was taken into another room, and given plenty of water. The odor of carbolic acid was very perceptible. Usually physicians have attributed no harm to the vapo-cresolene lamp, but I ask for your experiences. Whether the pulmonary edema was due to the congestion of the kidneys or not I am unable to say. This second case also recovered. The pulse and temperature soon became normal and the physician in attendance then said he thought it was a case of " suffocative catarrh." But I do not think there is any doubt about the diagnosis of poisoning by vapo-cresolene.

HEMORRHAGE INTO THE SUPRARENAL CAPSULE IN STILL-BORN CHILDREN AND INFANTS; REPORT OF A CASE SHOWING RUPTURE OF THE SAC AND ESCAPE OF BLOOD INTO THE PERIRENAL TISSUES AND THE PERITONEAL CAVITY.
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STROH'S BOTTLE TOPPER

MY STROH'S BOTTLE TOPPER, THIS I TRADED OFF MARK,SAW HIM DIG IT AND HAD TOO HAVE IT.

 

1850
Bernhard Stroh establishes brewery in Detroit. Logo uses the Lion's Crest from the Kyrburg Castle in Germany. Brewery is called Lion's Head Brewery. The lion crest is still used today on packaging.

1890’s
Stroh introduces European fire-brewing method. Process uses a direct flame rather than steam to heat copper kettles, claiming higher temperatures bring out more flavor.

1956
Stroh sales reach 2.7 million barrels.

1964
Brewery faces “Grow or Go” dilemma. Buys Goebel Brewing Company across the street, adding 200,000 barrels of capacity. In 1972 becomes top ten brewer with market area of nine states.

1973
Becomes eighth-largest brewery selling 4 million barrels in 17 states.

1978
Volume reaches 6.4 million barrels nearly outgrowing the 7 million barrel production capacity. Purchases New York's F&M Schaefer Brewing Corporation, gaining access to Schaefer's 1 million barrel brewery in Allentown, PA. Gains Schaefer and Piel’s brands.

1982
Acquires Schlitz and becomes third-largest brewer. Stroh reduces price of Schlitz to below the premium level. Abandons the fire-brewing process.

1985
Claims 12 percent of the U.S. beer market maintaining its third place position. Debt load from Schlitz acquisition hinders ability to invest in production efficiencies. Stroh closes its aging Detroit brewery in 1985. By 1990 Stroh's market share is cut in half.

1991
Implements 3-pronged strategy: new products, contract brewing, and expanding overseas. Launch Old Milwaukee NA (non-alcoholic) and Stroh's NA.

1994-95
Launch Old Milwaukee Ice, Schlitz Ice, Schlitz Ice Light, Bull Ice, Schaefer Ice, Stroh’s Genuine Draft Light, Old Milwaukee Genuine Draft, and Schlitz Genuine Draft.

1996
Acquires Heileman for $290 million. (Heileman had been bought by the Bond Corp. of Australia for $1.3 billion in 1982, and then purchased out of bankruptcy court by the Dallas buyout firm Hicks Muse Tate for $390 million in 1993).

1999
Acquired by Pabst Brewing Company.
GENERAL CHEMICAL & REED & CARNRICK

A FAVORITE BOTTLE WITH REMOVABLE RIBBED LID FROM THE GENERAL CHEMICAL COMPANY AND DATED TO 1900,S WITH TOOLED LIP. 

GENERAL CHEMICAL COMPANY.

Mr. Bagg, secretary of the General Chemical Company, in the affidavit submitted by him, states that the business of that company is the manufacture of heavy chemicals. The company bought the property of 12 previously existing companies, including 19 separate plants. Three other plants have since been acquired.No promoter was concerned in the organization of the company, and there was no underwriting syndicate. The consolidation was effected entirely by agreement among those engaged in the business. An appraisal committee was formed to determine the fair cash value of the plants taken over. The valuation of the intangible property was based in part upon the net earnings of the several constituent companies for 5$ years before the consolidation. The plants were paid for with securities of the consolidated company, common stock being issued in payment for intangible property, and for some of the plants, which were earning less than 8 per cent per annum net profit. The company was formed because it was hoped that the severity of competition which existed would be done away with, and because of the expectation that economies in production and sale would be effected. Considerable economies have been realized. The greatest gain has been the economy in production, which has been due to the control by the central office of the manufacturing department and of the buying. An appreciable saving in the cost of raw materials is effected through baying for all the plants together. A saving has teen made through the avoidance of cross freights. The number of traveling salesmen is practically the same as before consolidation. It has riot been possible as yet to close any of the plants, but it is expected that some of the smaller and less efficient plants may be closed in the future. The selling price of chemicals has in some cases gone up, but that this has been because of advances in the prices of raw materials. The foreign sales are made on practically the same basis of prices as the domestic sales. The only difference is in the prices charged for packages. Wages have been very generally increased since the formation of the company. The tariff has very little effect upon the business. Competing foreign goods are not likely to be imported under ordinary conditions. Special facilities for transportation, which the company has, make foreign competition practically impossible. The tariff, however, is a safeguard against the sale of surplus stocks in this country by foreign manufacturers. "Mr. Bagg submits a statement made to the stockholders of the General Chemical Company in February, 1901, giving the net profits of the company for the year 1900, the dividends paid, and the surplus account, and the balance sheet of the company, of December 31, 1900, showing the assets and liabilities at that date

 

 

 

 

 

 TOMBSTONE SHAPED 1880,S BLOWN BOTTLE IN DARK AMBER AND STANDING 7+ INCHES TALL. EMBOSSED REED AND CARNRICK  PHARMCISTS NEW YORK. A HEAVY THICK BOTTLE.

REED & CARNRICK

John Carnrick, of Reed & Carnrick, New York, has done some very meritorious work in the realm of pharmaceutical chemistry. A native of Sand Lake, Rensselaer County, New York, he spent his boyhood in Troy and came to New York at the age of 17. After teaching school for a while he took a course in medicine, but instead of graduating he opened a drug store in Jersey City, and commenced the study of pharmacy and chemistry with a view to improving the palatable qualities of medicines. Thus John Carnrick may be said to be one of the pioneers in the field of what is known as elegant pharmacy.The original drug store was operated by Mr. Carnrick under the name of Gardner & Carnrick. This was afterward changed to Carnrick & Andrus, and subsequently to Reed & Carnrick, a name now famous all over the world. Through all the changes of name it was Mr. Carnrick's genius as a chemist that made the success of the house possible. The preparations which he invented are used to-day by the medical profession in every civilized country on the globe. He has always in the introduction of his preparations to the medical profession given to them every detail of manufacture and invited them to his laboratories to examine every process and manipulation, and has always insisted that their introduction should be in the hands of the medical profession. Mr. Carnrick claims the honor of having introduced elixirs as a class of pharmaceutical products over thirty years ago. Among a few of the principal preparations he introduced are Lactopeptine, Maltine, Peptonoids, Peptenzyme, Protonuclein and Soluble Food. One feature of Mr. Carnrick's business method has been the organization of several companies to carry on the sale of his various discoveries. Among these are the New York Pharmacal Association, the Maltine Manufacturing Company, and the Arlington Chemical Company. The preparations manufactured by these companies were popularized by Reed & Carnrick. The reason for the success of Reed & Carnrick's preparations is probably that Mr. Carnrick makes it a rule not to put upon the market a preparation of his invention unless it fills a want and is in his belief actually superior to anything of the sort previously discovered. Large fortunes have been made from his discoveries, one man having made from the manufacture of one of these preparations something like $2,000,000, it is said. Mr. Carnrick, though a wealthy man, has not reaped so largely as those to whom he has sold. He lives comfortably in a beautiful home on Park avonne with his family, to whom he is devoted. His place of business is unpretentious. It is located at 428 West Broadway, New York.  FEED YOUR PATIENTS. The^ need a highly nutritious, easily assimilated food. contains besides the nutritive elements of beef, gluten of wheat and nucleo-albumins, the enzymes of the digestive gland. As it does not irritate the stomach, and leaves no residue to enter the intestinal tract, it is indicated in all those conditions where artificial feeding is necessary, and is especially useful in Typhoid Fever, Vomiting of Pregnancy, and Diseases of the Digestive System.

DR A. BOSHEE'S GERMAN SYRUP

George Gill Green (January 16, 1842 – February 26, 1925) was a patent medicine entrepreneur, and Colonel in the American Civil War.

He was born in Clarksboro (in [[{East Greenwich Township, New Jersey]]) to Mary Ann (1820-1844) and Lewis M. Green (1818-1894). George's mother was from Pennsylvania, and his father was working as a butcher. George attended the University of Pennsylvania medical school for two years, but left in 1864 before he graduated. He enlisted in the 142d Regiment, Illinois Volunteers during the Civil War. In 1867 he started a wholesale drug business in Baltimore, Maryland but the factory was destroyed by a fire. He moved to Ohio and married Angie Brown and had their first child there. They moved to Woodbury, New Jersey on Thanksgiving Day; November 23, 1872. They had a son: George Gill Green II (1883-1971) who was born on January 17, 1883 and died in January 1971.

George bought the rights to "Green's August Flower" and "Dr. Boschee's German Syrup" from his father, Lewis M. Green (1818-1894), who sold the elixir under the name "L.M. Green". George created a marketing campaign involving mass mailings of free samples, and the distribution of thousands of his almanacs. Both elixirs were mostly laudanum. He became a millionaire and in 1880 he built Woodbury's Opera House. In 1898 he built the Castle Green in Pasadena, California as an annex to his Hotel Green. Hotel Green islisted on the National Register of Historic Places, the California State Historic Register, and the City of Pasadena Register of City Treasures. He also had a summer home at Lake Hopatcong. His patent medicine business declined after the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906 and by 1916 the products were discontinued. He died in Woodbury, New Jersey on February 26, 1925.



Boschee's German Syrup, A Throat  and Lung  Specialty.'     

Those who have not used BOSCHEE'S GERMAN SYRUP for some severe and chronic trouble of the Throat and Lungs can hardly appreciate what a truly wonderful medicine it is. The delicious sensations of healing, easing, clearing, strength-gathering, and recovering, are unknown joys.
For GERMAN SYRUP we do not ask easy cases. Sugar and water may soothe a throat or stop a tickling for a while., This is as far as the ordinary cough medicine goes.
BOSCHEE'S GERMAN SYRUP is a discovery, a great Throat and Lung specialty. Where for years there have been sensitiveness, pain, coughing, spitting, hemorrhage, voice failure, weakness, slipping down hill-where doctors and medicine and advice have been followed and swallowed to the gulf of despair-where there is the sickening conviction that all is over and the end is inevitable-there we place GERMAN SYRUP. It cures always. You're alive man yet if you take it!
    SIR:-GERMAN SYRUP saved the life of my wife, and she is quite well to-day.

               -A. D. LANE, Druggist, Montpelier, Vt.

G. GLOCER, DRUGGIST, WATERTOWN, Wis. This is, the opinion of a man who keeps a drug store, sells all, medicines, comes in direct contact with the patients and their families, and knows better than any one else, how remedies sell, and what true merit they have.   He hears all the failures and successes, and can therefore judge.
"I know of no medicine for Coughs, Sore Throat, or Hoarseness, that has done such effective work in my family as BOSCHEE'S GERMAN SYRUP. It will invariably cure, as I know from experience. I also believe it is a great preventive against diphtheria, if used in time. It is a most effective remedy in cases of sleeplessness caused by severe coughs, giving almost instant relief. Your remedies give general satisfaction, and those who have used them buy again.”
Last winter a lady called at my store who was suffering from a very severe cold. She could hardly talk, and I told her about GERMAN SYRUP, and that a few doses would give relief; but she had no confidence in patent medicines. I told her to take a bottle, and if the results were not satisfactory I would make no charge for it.
A few days after she called and paid for it, saying she would “never be without it in future, as a few doses had given her great relief."

SIR:-I shall certainly place the GERMAN SYRUP and AUGUST FLOWER wherever I can, not for personal reasons alone, but because of their intrinsic value, of which I have for years been convinced.-

               D. LORRIAUX, Druggist, Ottawa, ill. 

 

POISONING BY BOSCHEE'S GERMAN SYRUP.

The following case may be of interest to the profession. A short time ago, I visited a patient at about 10 A. M., and while examining him, my attention was called to an infant three weeks old, who the mother said was dying. Upon hasty examination and inquiry, I was at a loss to account for its alarming condition; but being struck by its marked cyanotic appearance, slow respiration—three or four a minute—contracted pupils, responding sluggishly and feebly to light, and pulselessness, I asked the mother if she had given it anything. She replied that on the afternoon of the previous day she {*ave it three or four drops of Boschee's German Syrup for a "slight cold" it had had for a day or two. This statement of the mother at once threw a flood of light upon the case, as the symptoms were undoubtedly those of opium poisoning. The alarming symptoms came on about an hour after the administration of the syrup, and had continued ever since. The child had always enjoyed good health, excepting the "slight cold" already referred to. There was no discoverable pulmonary or bronchial lesion. Atropia and stimulants produced a slight but transient improvement in the symptoms and the child died in a few hours, about thirty after the administration of the syrup.— Druggists' Circular.

 

 

CALDERS DENTINE, PROVIDENCE,R.I.


 

  NICE LITTLE 1880'S DENTAL BOTTLE DUG SOME YEARS AGO,CORK ADDED.

Albert L. Calder was born in Providence, September 6, 1825. He died in this city May 24, 1899. He was the son of William and Eliza (Spencer) Calder. When seventeen years of age he entered the employ of Joseph Balch, the druggist, and remained with him for about seven years. After a few years spent in drug stores in Boston and Lowell he returned to Providence, and in company with his brother, George B. Calder, opened an apothecary's store on Westminster Street. This store was burned to the ground in 1853, whereupon Mr. Calder erected near the site of the old store a new building, which he continued to occupy until his retirement from the retail business in 1885. It is said that when he sold out he was the oldest merchant on Westminster Street. After his retirement from the retail field he gave his time to the manufacture of Calder's Dentine, an article which, like another Providence production, Perry Davis's Pain-Killer, is to be found in every apothecary's store in the country. Mr. Calder served for eight years in the Common Council of Providence. He represented the city in the Legislature in 1891-92. Always an active Republican, he was. especially prominent in city politics during the Civil War. He was connected as a director with many corporations, was a trustee of the Rhode Island Hospital and vice-president of the Industrial Trust Co. He was twice married, first to Martha Ann Howland, of Barre, Mass. Her four children, Mrs. R. A. Robertson, Mrs. John G. Aldrich, Dr. Augustus W. Calder and Charles A. Calder, are still living. In 1892 he married Mrs. Ellen O'Connor, of Washington, D. C., who survives him. He became a member of the Historical Society in 1891

 LARKIN CO.BUFFALO,N.Y.

      1880'S LARKIN SOAP CO. BUFFALO,NEW YORK 

The Larkin Soap Company was founded in Buffalo in 1875. Among the principals were John D. Larkin, Elbert Hubbard, and Darwin D. Martin. By the early years of the twentieth century, the company expanded beyond soap manufacturing into groceries, dry goods, china, and furniture. Larkin became a pioneering, national mail-order house with branch stores in Buffalo, New York City and Chicago. At the time it commissioned its headquarters, Larkin was prosperous and the high price for a well-designed, innovative building was not a barrier. The company, known for its generous corporate culture, also commissioned Wright to design row houses for its workers, which were never built   The Larkin Building was designed in 1904 by Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1906 for the Larkin Soap Company of Buffalo, New York, at 680 Seneca Street. It was demolished in 1950. The five story dark red brick building used pink tinted mortar and utilized steel frame construction. It was noted for many innovations, including air conditioning, stained glass windows, built-in desk furniture, and suspended toilet bowls (hung from the walls, not supported by the floor). Sculptor Richard Bock provided ornamentation for the building.[1] Exterior details were executed in red sandstone; the entrance doors, windows, and skylights were of glass. Floors, desktops, and cabinet tops were covered with magnesite for sound absorption. For floors, magnesite was mixed with excelsior and poured, and troweled like cement, over a layer of felt to impart it's resiliency. Magnesite was also used for sculptural decoration on the piers surrounding the light court and for panels and beams around the executive offices at the south end of the main floor. Frank Lloyd Wright designed much of the furniture. The interior walls were made of semi-vitreous, hard, cream colored brick. The building's approximate dimensions were 200 feet long by 134 feet wide. The light court was located in the center of the building, and was 76 feet tall. It provided plenty of natural light to all of the floors. In the light court, between the piers on the sides of the court, there appeared fourteen sets of three inspiration words each, such as: GENEROSITY ALTRUISM SACRIFICE, INTEGRITY LOYALTY FIDELITY, IMAGINATION JUDGEMENT INITIATIVE, INTELLIGENCE ENTHUSIASM CONTROL, CO-OPERATION ECONOMY INDUSTRY.

GERMAN MADE LYSOL WITH STOPPER
PRETTY SCARCE GERMAN IRREGULAR HEX LYSOL POISON WITH PORCELAIN STOPPER,I LUCKED INTO 20 YRS.AGO YOU DO NOT SEE THESE COME UP VERY OFTEN AND ALMOST NEVER WITH ANY OF THE STOPPER PARTS. I HAVE BOUGHT,TRADED AND SOLD ALOT OF POISON BOTTLES OVER THE YEARS BUT THIS ONE I ALWAYS KEEP.

Referring to a report from Germany, where a Mr. Fulde has cured foul brood by means of a new disinfectant, lysol. Dr. C. D. Miller asked in Gleanings, page88. "What's lysol? and will It work as well in the English language as in the German?" The editor remarks thereon: "I should be interested, also. In knowing whether the disease stayed away. Perhaps Mr. Uravenhorst will answer the question."Yes, I will answer the question according to the best Information I can get. I have not tried lysol, because I did not know of It before September of last year. The new disinfectant has been manufactured for a few years by Schiilke & Mayr, at Hamburg, Germany. They produced it from coaltar. It has a brown color, and smells like tar. In Germany It is to be had In every drugstore, and perhaps in America also. Mr. Fulde purchased a bottle of lysol for 2j£ cents, and therewith cured his bees, which were badly infected with foul brood. He took ten pounds of sugarsyrup, boiled and skimmed it, and mixed it up with 24 drops of lysol and 4 drops of carbolic acid. He gave a colony a soup-plate full of this food. After three days he found the sick larvae dry in their cells, and In a lapse of three weeks not a trace of foul brood was to be found In his colonies. They were sound, and did swarm. Later he has fed lysol in the same way, particularly In the spring, to protect his bees against foul brood. He never saw a trace of it again. That's all I know about lysol. I hope some of the German and American bee-keepers will try the new disinfectant. It would be a great benefit to bee-keeping if lysol should prove to be a remedy for such a rapidly spreading disease as foul brood. Then it would be a trifle for every one to cure the malady himself. However, I confess that I do not have such confidence in lysol as Mr. Fulde has. Experienced bee-keepers in Germany, and I myself, too, are of the oplpion that the disease will disappear, oftentimes, without any cure other than a good honey-flow, when good sound honey is coming in, and that most of the remedies tried in such cases did not cure foul brood at all. The good honey-flow only, did it, nothing more. Hundreds of remedies have been recommended, but, when tried, they would not work as was claimed. May be that, in one or the other case, the remedy was not used as 11 should have been; but I think most of the recommended remedies are worthless, and rest upon illusion. On account of the importance of the matter, it may not be out of the way to report concernIng a disinfectant that I have used nearly twenty years, with such results, that, for my part, I hold the foul brood question as fully solved. I have had to fight hard against foul brood, as I resided In Brunswick, and, later,, here in Wilsnack; but I have never lost one colony by It. I had to guard my apiaries against neighboring bees infected with foul brood, in apiaries only a thousand paces, or less than half a mile, distant. Well, it was a very bad position for myself; but I have fought it out. In a few cases, where the neighboring apiaries were lost by foul brood, I have found iu some of my hives slight traces of the disease. However, they disappeared swiftly by my treatment. I used, and have used till to-day, although I have not at present any apiaries near by that are Infected with foul brood, carbolic acid—not the refined article you get at the drugstore Iu the shape of white crystals, but black and unrefined carbolic acid, which Is intermingled with coal-tar, and mostly used as paint. Refined carbolic acid is too strong, and the sanative power of the tar Is absent In it. I am of the opinion that just the tar, in connection with the carbolic acid, has much to do In the cure of foul brood, as Dr. Preuss said. He was the first bee-keeper who studied foul brood.

PROTONUCLEIN & PEPSIKOLA MINTURES
I HAVE A COUPLE OF THESE TINY GROUND MOUTH PROTONUCLEIN BOTTLES WITH THEIR UNIQUE SHAPE AND THEY DATE TOO 1900,S RANGE.1+ INCHES IS ALL AND WITH THE ORIGINAL CAP A REAL NEAT BOTTLE.

 

THIS IS A SCARCE 1890,S BLOWN 1+ INCH TALL  PEPSIKOLA TABLETS BOTTLE. THIS IS NOT PEPSI COLA AND WAS EVENTUALLY SHUT DOWN FOR PATENT ISSUES I'M TOLD,A SCARCE AND VERY COLLECTABLE BOTTLE IN MINT CONDITION.

 

DATED 1882 EXCIDE BATTERY JAR                     THE ELECTRIC STORAGE BATTERY CO.

 

New Storage Battery Jar, Practically Unbreakable

The storage battery in the mind of the average layman is apt to mean a "black box of mystery" mounted on his automobile to start his motor and furnish current for his lights. He is very apt to regard the battery as being delicate in construction, whereas the storage battery actually is today playing a very important part in the most strenuous service. As an instance of this the mine locomotive may be cited.

This mine service is usually severe and the battery must be exceptionally rugged to withstand the bangs and bumps. The tracks as a rule are bad and frequent head-on collisions are not unusual. The battery has in this service, however, made a wonderful record. In the past there has been but one serious objection, the battery's jars would some times crack under an unusually severe jolt.

The Electric Storage Battery Co., manufacturers of the "Ironclad-Exide" battery, realizing this, has for some time been experimenting to develop an unbreakable jar. What is known as the "Giant" jar is the result.

The "Giant" jar of the "Ironclad-Exide" battery, is made of a semi-flexible compound, exceptionally tough and strong. Exhaustive tests have proved that these "Giant" jars will stand a pressure of 2,000 pounds at their weakest point, whereas the old type jar broke at less than 1,000 pounds; that the "Giant" jar will support at its weakest point the

[graphic][subsumed]
[graphic]

Two "Iron-Exlde" Giant Jart Supporting Eight Husky Men

weight of four husky men, whereas the old jar would not support the weight of one man; that an electrical test of 30.000 volts does not puncture the "Giant" jar.

Moreover thousands of these jars have in actual service demonstrated their ability to withstand the hardest and most severe service. The "Giant" jar is now the standard for the "Ironclad-Exide" battery that is so very extensively used for mine locomotives, industrial trucks and

 

 


 

                              

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